Tag Archives: World news

Here’s the main issue behind the Jamie Oliver jerk rice row- and it’s not cultural appropriation

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People object to a minted guy making money from an inauthentic food, while those who eat the real thing get diddly-squat

You can discover, even from a great distance, that some arguments have a hot, intractable core that won’t be easily cooled, in the same way that you can tell by watching a pub engage whether it is about a fraternal disloyalty or somebody spilling something. The fracas over the luminary chef Jamie Oliver’s punchy jerk rice- which led the Labour MP Dawn Butler to tweet:” Your schmuck rice is not OK. This appropriation from Jamaica needs to stop”- is just such a row.

Oliver followers thrust themselves awake. Which bit of his rice is wrong, again? That he would use flavouring that originated in another culture; that he would get the seasoning wrong; or that he would misapply it to the wrong ingredient, “jerk” being intended for meat , not rice? What do the liberals require? Where was Butler when he started using mostarda di frutta on pasta? Won’t someone must be considered the Italians?” And what about tea ?”, contributed the contrarians.” Is that culture appropriation? Now we’ve appropriated it, is anyone else drinking it suitable it back down us ?” The untrained observer, arriving from space, would assume we were a nation that furiously and irrationally adoration, or detested, Oliver, whereupon discussing him at all itself becomes an act of cultural appropriation. But that’s not really what’s going on.

If you never borrow anything, that is a creed of insularity and parochialism. Because this is an easy point to score, a lot of beings are coming in to bat for Oliver who wouldn’t start near his dork rice with a 10 -ft spoon, and never tasted his jollof rice either, with which he doubly insulted an entire continent in 2014, manufacturing it nothing like it was supposed to taste, and clumsily attributing it to Ghana when its ancestries are rivalry. It was like going in to a Greek restaurant and telling a Turkish coffee, except multiplied by 17 and offering to make it yourself, with cloves.

But what people are angry about isn’t the homely cross-pollination of one lusciou thing with another, but that a person who is already minted is making a load of coin out of a bastardised version of something, while the people who eat the authentic dish form diddly-squat from it. It is just another inequality story, exploding through the social surface like a hickey. We’ll mash it for a bit, it will hurt, some gunk will come out. The underlying predicaments will remain unchanged, until a fresh simmer explosions, maybe when Jeremy Paxman propels his own street-style label.

What is illuminating is that all this illustrates the place made a decade ago in the book The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Cultures Nearly Always Do Better that inequality is bad for everyone; it obligates everyone angrier, rich and good; everyone’s mental health slumps, whatever their class. Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, the book’s writers, were never enormous adventurers on why this should be, preferring not to obscure their clear epidemiological evidence with speculation. But you can understand on a bowel degree why it might adversely affect all of us. Oliver probably does not wake up thinking of himself as emblematic of a rigged plan. If all debate about equality is refracted through individuals, then nobody is culpable enough to stand for the injustice of privilege, and if you want to represent the underdog, you have to be so oppressed yourself that you are almost dead. Personal credentials become the beginning and end of a battle that cannot be acquired on that territory. A tranche of opinion will conclude that the debate is too monotonous to bother with, or, as Peter York formerly archly said:” I’m just waiting for Gardeners’ Question Time to start talking about the inequality between my wisteria and my hydrangeas .”

I don’t have the answer, by the way: but I know it won’t be resolved by rice, and it would help if the super-rich tried superhumanly hard not to be jerks.

Is Michael Gove barking up the right tree?

Michael Gove is not the go-to politician if your main issue is puppies- shortly after his stand against puppy” sanction collars”( remote-controlled collars that allow you to blast your bird-dog with an electric shock or, more commonly, cold breeze where reference is misbehaves ), he went back on the relevant recommendations of a injunction. Now, though, he has come out against puppy farms. He will find few people who won’t support him in this: nonetheless much you distrust him and hopelessnes of his Singapore-in-the-channel vision for Britain, you must despise more anyone who would malnourish a puppy for currency. If there is one thing besides Bake Off we could all sign up to, surely this would be it?

Gove, like Boris Johnson, has apparently turned to Facebook for intel on how to acquire himself seem leaderly, except his dog whistle is not Islamophobia but real hounds. There is a peculiar quality to the animal-rights activism on Facebook. You would think it would be fluffy because swine are, but it often intent up in a singular plaza, announcing for the death penalty for unscrupulous puppy-farm owners or age-old testament resurgence right, where people who leave bird-dogs in hot autoes are, themselves, locked in hot cars.

The great boon of pup-rights is that they can’t easily be aligned politically, so people who wouldn’t be happy with far-right overtones, or those of the left, can agree snugly into some righteous indignation that doesn’t involve blast their neighbours’ spaces. This is the happy place of the modern Tory moderate: all the intensity and zeal of communal rampage, but nothing of the unfortunate and ugly ethno-nationalism.

The only problem is that anger is not politically constructive: some spleen is inevitable, but simply as a side-dish. For generative social image, you may have to look somewhere other than social media.

No deal: how the euro has become the talk of British holidaymakers

” Imagine how inexpensive that would otherwise have been, before June 2016 …” This is the staple holiday conversation, repeated by every Brit in the eurozone, every seven hours, sometimes amended by the strange:” Well, that would still have been expensive, even when you got EUR1. 39 to the PS1″, and culminating in the regular explosion:” One to murderou one! We might as well have gone to Sweden and squander five quid on an apple .” Many things could change the climate, when autumn comes: the publication of the no-deal Armageddon scenarios may fetch MPs to their appreciations. But these escapades in Carrefour, get pointlessly mugged to no one’s benefit, will supply an interesting background dirge.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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They owned an island, now they are urban poor: the tragedy of Altamira

Construction of the Belo Monte dam has cast men, women and children who lived rich lives along the Xingu River to the outskirts of Altamira, Brazils most violent city. Here, to the sound of gunfire, they must live behind barred windows, and buy food with money theyve never had or needed before

They owned an island, now they are urban poor: the tragedy of Altamira

They owned an island, now they are urban poor: the tragedy of Altamira

Construction of the Belo Monte dam has cast men, women and children who lived rich lives along the Xingu River to the outskirts of Altamira, Brazil’s most violent city. Here, to the sound of gunfire, they must live behind barred windows, and buy food with money they’ve never had – or needed before

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Barbra Streisand exposes she cloned her puppy twice

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Singer and performer tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has divulged she successfully obliged two clones of her pet dog after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have different temperaments ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown eyes and her seriousness .”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she garmented them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their advent, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand adopted her and imparted her the call Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her performing career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she prevailed an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but told me that she never liked the film.

” I envisaged I was absolutely miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Barbra Streisand discloses she cloned her bird-dog twice

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Singer and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has divulged she successfully cleared two clones of her baby puppy after it died last year.

The singer and actor told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, announced Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown eyes and her seriousness .”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she garmented them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their advent, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was announced Funny Girl, but Streisand chose her and caused her the refer Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her play career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she won an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I anticipated I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Here’s the main issue behind the Jamie Oliver jerk rice row- and it’s not cultural appropriation

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

People object to a minted person making money from an inauthentic bowl, while those who eat the real thing get diddly-squat

You can hear, even from a great distance, that some statements have a hot, insoluble core that won’t be easily cooled, in the same way that you can tell by watching a tavern contend whether it is about a fraternal sellout or somebody spilling something. The fracas over the personality chef Jamie Oliver’s punchy jerk rice- which led to the loss the Labour MP Dawn Butler to tweet:” Your yank rice is not OK. This appropriation from Jamaica needs to stop”- is just such a row.

Oliver devotees pushed themselves awake. Which bit of his rice is wrong, again? That he would use spice that originated in another culture; that he would get the seasoning wrong; or that he would misapply it to the wrong part, “jerk” being intended for meat , not rice? What do the liberals crave? Where was Butler when he started exploiting mostarda di frutta on pasta? Won’t someone think of the Italians?” And what about tea ?”, added the contrarians.” Is that cultural appropriation? Now we’ve appropriated it, is anyone else drinking it suitable it back down us ?” The untrained commentator, arriving from space, would assume we were a nation that furiously and irrationally adored, or detested, Oliver, whereupon discussing him at all itself becomes an act of cultural appropriation. But that’s not really what’s going on.

If you never borrow anything, that is a creed of insularity and parochialism. Because this is an easy point to score, a lot of parties are coming in to bat for Oliver who wouldn’t get near his yank rice with a 10 -ft spoon, and never tasted his jollof rice either, with which he doubly reviled an whole continent in 2014, realise it nothing like it was supposed to taste, and clumsily attributing it to Ghana when its parentages are raced. It was like going in to a Greek restaurant and telling a Turkish coffee, except multiplied by 17 and offering to make it yourself, with cloves.

But what beings are angry about isn’t the homely cross-pollination of one deliciou thing with another, but that a person who is already minted is making a load of fund out of a bastardised version of something, while the people who eat the authentic food constitute diddly-squat from it. It is just another inequality story, exploding through the social scalp like a hickey. We’ll crush it for a bit, it will hurt, some gunk will come out. The underlying modes is unchanged, until a fresh steam starts, maybe when Jeremy Paxman launches his own street-style label.

What is illuminating is that all this illustrates the detail made a decade ago in the book The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Virtually Always Do Better that difference is bad for everyone; it acquires everyone angrier, rich and good; everyone’s mental health diminishes, whatever their class. Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, the book’s scribes, “ve never been” enormous plungers on why this should be, wishing not to blur their clear epidemiological sign with speculation. But you can understand on a gut degree why it might adversely affect all of us. Oliver probably does not wake up thinking of himself as emblematic of a rigged organisation. If all debate about equality is refracted through individuals, then nobody is culpable enough to stand for the sin of advantage, and if you want to represent the underdog, you have to be so subdued yourself that you are almost dead. Personal credentials become the beginning and end of a battle that cannot be triumphed on that territory. A tranche of ruling will conclude that the debate is too laborious to bother with, or, as Peter York once archly said:” I’m just waiting for Gardeners’ Question Time to start talking about the inequality between my wisteria and my hydrangeas .”

I don’t have the answer, by the way: but I know it won’t be resolved by rice, and it would be facilitated if the super-rich tried superhumanly hard not to be jerks.

Is Michael Gove barking up the privilege tree?

Michael Gove is not the go-to politician if your main issue is puppies- shortly thereafter his stand against puppy” penalty collars”( remote-controlled collars that allow you to blast your puppy with an electric shock or, more commonly, cold air when it misbehaves ), he went back on the idea of a outlaw. Now, though, he has come out against puppy farms. He will find few people who won’t support him in this: however much you distrust him and anguish of his Singapore-in-the-channel vision for Britain, you must despise more anyone who would malnourish a puppy for money. If there is one thing besides Bake Off we could all sign up to, surely this would be it?

Gove, like Boris Johnson, has apparently turned to Facebook for intel on how to oblige himself seem leaderly, except his bird-dog whistling is not Islamophobia but real dogs. There is a peculiar quality to the animal-rights activism on Facebook. You would think it would be fluffy because animals are, but it often discontinues up in a peculiar residence, calling for the death penalty for dishonest puppy-farm owneds or age-old evidence resurgence justice, where people who leave dogs in hot gondolas are, themselves, locked in hot cars.

The great boon of pup-rights is that they can’t easily be aligned politically, so people who wouldn’t be happy with far-right connotations, or those of the left, can colonize snugly into some righteous rage that doesn’t involve break their neighbours’ windows. This is the happy place of the modern Tory moderate: all the intensity and zeal of communal rage, but none of the unfortunate and ugly ethno-nationalism.

The only problem is that anger is not politically constructive: some spleen is inevitable, but exclusively as a side-dish. For generative social perception, you may have to look somewhere other than social media.

No deal: how the euro has become the talk of British holidaymakers

” Imagine how inexpensive that would otherwise have been, before June 2016 …” This is the staple holiday conversation, repeated by every Brit in the eurozone, every seven minutes, sometimes amended by the peculiar:” Well, that would still have been expensive, even when you got EUR1. 39 to the PS1″, and culminating in the regular blowup:” One to blood one! We might as well have gone to Sweden and exhaust five quid on an apple .” Many things could change the weather, when autumn comes: the publication of the no-deal Armageddon scenarios may accompany MPs to their feels. But these undertakings in Carrefour, getting pointlessly mugged to no one’s benefit, will supply an interesting background dirge.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her puppy twice

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Singer and performer tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has uncovered she successfully formed two clones of her baby dog after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown gazes and her seriousness .”

In the interrogation, Streisand said when the cloned pups arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their entrance, Streisand said she became smitten with another dog, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was announced Funny Girl, but Streisand chose her and dedicated her the refer Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her act career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she won an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I belief I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Offended by Koreans eating dog? I trust you’ve never had a bacon butty | Chas Newkey-Burden

Frightened animals being caged, killed and turned into food wed never dream of such evils in the western world, writes journalist and author Chas Newkey-Burden

Offended by Koreans eating dog? I trust you’ve never had a bacon butty

Frightened animals being caged, killed and turned into food – we’d never dream of such evils in the west … would we?

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Undocumented, vulnerable, scared: the women who pick your food for$ 3 an hour

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In the fields of south Texas Mexican women labor long hours in dangerous modes under the ever-present threat of deportation

On a rainy, pre-dawn Monday morning in the fields of the Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border in south Texas, little constellations of flashlights wink in the different regions of the light-green field. They are held by undocumented immigrants, principally from Mexico, and largely living in fear of arrest and deportation but wielding all the same to provide for their families. Their paws twist the relationship on bunches of parsley or hack stalks of kale until their palms blister. Most of Texas is still asleep.

Many of them are paid on a contract basis, by the box. A carton of cilantro will earn construction workers$ 3; experienced farmworkers say they can fill one within an hour, which entails a usual 5am to 6pm work day would pay them $39 total. The run can run from physically unpleasant and banal( cilantro, loot, beets) to outright agonizing and dangerous( watermelon, parsley, grapefruit ).

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard dark-green bunches that they reaped in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

The few women who work in the fields face even more afflictions. Specimen of workplace sexual harassment and assault are widespread and are both underreported and under-prosecuted. It is common for women to capitulate to a supervisor’s betterments because she can’t risk losing her job or expulsion. Most of these women are supporting progenies as well.

In the fields of south Texas, those women represent a diverse cross-section of lives upturned by drug-related and domestic violence in Mexico. Under new US immigration protocols, these are extraordinarily tense seasons for immigrants- getting caught by officials could represent being sent back or having your kids placed under a enclosure. And yet the women included in this piece refused to hide their faces or reform their names.

They want their floors told.

Janet, 36

Janet,
Janet, 36, left, and her father Edith, 55 constitute for a photo outside Janet’s house. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

” I contemplate I labour evenly a little faster as the three men ,” Janet Castro says, crouching over and slicing the beginnings from the greens of the cilantro collect. A 36 -year-old veteran of fieldwork( “shes been” picking grow since she was 17 ), Castro is able to hold a speech without stopping the swift movement of her spear. A bandanna covers her nose and mouth to keep the headache-inducing cilantro scent out; otherwise the headache last-places for hours after she’s left the field.

Parsley is worse:” There is a milk in the branches of the parsley that gets on us when we cut it ,” she clarifies. As a cause, one day in the fields snip parsley can necessitate two weeks of itchy, stinging skin that is rough to the touch.” We can’t wear gauntlets because the boss says a piece of the gauntlet could get into the product ,” she illustrates, and long sleeves was able to press the milk into the skin.

‘I’m access to it ,” she shrugs, in her stoic course, as she scratches her scaly arm.

Janet has worked with the same supervisor for nine years. She describes him as a good guy who has even lent her $200 when she needed it. Despite bending over for most of the day, she says she doesn’t suffer the same back pain that other farmworkers do.” I’m really fast at the onion, but there are some men who say I am taking their work. The response I have is that this work is for my children .”

Janet met her husband the first year she started working in the fields. Back at home, they have three children, each with developmental problems; one, the midriff daughter, has autism and needs a part-time caretaker. Her older son has suffered epileptic convulsions since he was a baby, and the youngest is starting to show developmental topics as well. Janet says her doctors imagine the source of her children’s troubles are the compounds used in the fields, but her undocumented status guided her to never search action at law. Plus, she didn’t want to lose her job.

Her solace is the Catholic church, and on her one day off- Sunday- she takes her family there. Afterwards they race residence, to avoid any potential run-ins with immigration authorities. She says she has heard rumors of immigration stingings at states parties and collects after religion, and though she says she does not live in fear, she still says she doesn’t like to go that risk.

She hopes that someday she might be able to call herself an American citizen.” I merely hope there is a way for us to get certificates, because some of us are really working here. Others are lazy and stay home, but I’m really working hard ,” she says before putting her youngest to bed, seven hours before she’ll need to arrive at the parsley battlefield the next morning.

Edith, 55

Edith,
Edith came to the US practically 20 years ago.’ I came to this country to give my family a better life. Work is very hard, but I don’t mind. We have to work .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Edith is Janet’s mom, though her outspoken manner opposes crisply with her daughter’s low-key, reticent behaviour. If Edith comes off as strong-headed, she says that her life has necessitated it.

Edith cultivated as a paramedic in Mexico, but she could barely make ends meet.” I lived in total privation in Mexico ,” she says, her gazes moistening.” My home was just a wood shack and when it rained we would get wet. I came here because this is a country of possibilities .”

Today she lives with her daughter Janet and her daughter’s lineage, but years ago their lives were turned upside down, shortly after Edith came across the Rio Grande River in the early 1990 s alone in an inner tube at night.

Four months after Edith arrived and learnt project as a housekeeper for a neighbourhood vocalist, she navigated back to Veracruz, Mexico, to draw her three teenage offsprings across national borders. Janet and her sister, both adolescents then, experienced production as housekeepers as well, but were getting attacked by people as they trod residence from their jobs. One period, Janet’s sister accepted a move dwelling and disappeared. Her brother, Edith’s son, spotted his sister after weeks of searching in an apartment building in another town. It is a fact that she and another girl had been being held there against their will and mistreated. Edith’s son went to the police to report the crime, and Edith says the abductors were jailed for a week, her son was also punished: he was deported.” The sleuth simply told me to call if my daughter got abducted again ,” Edith echoes with disgust,” and that’s when I decided to move towns “.

Starting over, Edith threw herself into work in the fields.” I don’t mind the hard work ,” she says,” I came to this country to fight .” Over her two decades of work in the fields, Edith has earned herself a reputation among the men as a tough chingona – a badass girl. Once, while working the watermelon fields where rattlesnakes are notorious, Edith expended her paramedic abilities to save the life of a worker who was bitten by a serpent:” I set my opening to it[ his leg] and sucked out the venom and spit it out .” Such bravery has turned her into a kind of mentor to other women working in the fields.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard light-green knots that they gathered in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

She also informally attorneys other female farmworkers against acquiescing to the pressure of men soliciting sex in exchange for better working conditions.” I always tell them,’ We have worked hard to be here , now don’t let yourself down .'” She says she still understands young women taken off by the supervisors to corners of the fields, but she has hope:” People know their rights a lot better now than they used to .”

Commonplace labor topics such as intimidation, refusal of collective bargaining claims, wage withholding or payable overtime work are also immense hurdles that they have few recourses to fight.

A report by Human Rights Watch notes that although US law entitles undocumented workers to workplace cares,” the US government’s interest in protecting unauthorized laborers from abuse conflicts with its interest in deporting them .” That report was written in 2015, but President Trump’s heightened drive for deportation and borderline close has only constructed things more impossible for undocumented farmworkers attempting to protect their proletariat rights.

That’s part of why Edith still considers giving up everything and returning with her family to Mexico.

” When you’re illegal here, it’s like you’re in prison. If you need assistance, there’s nowhere to go .”

Maria Rebecca, 23

María
Maria Rebecca, 23, and her daughter. She was eight when she started helping her father picking strawberries in Michoacan. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Maria Rebecca came to the US when she was pregnant with her second juvenile three years ago, leaving her older son with her parents back in Michoacan.

” My mommy spent her whole life working in the area[ in Mexico ], and the only reason she stopped was because one of the veins in her eye popped while she was working .”

Her sister and her daddy are still back in Michoacan working the fields, and it was her other sister who announced her to Texas, where she had already moved to.

” My sister knew that I desired working in the fields, and she “ve been told” I could make a lot more fund here .” Back in Mexico she would make about $30 a few weeks. Here, she could obligate $200 a week- if, that is, she was willing to take on the most dangerous types of work- gleaning in the orchards. She was: farm work is Maria Rebecca’s life.

” I started working in the fields when I was eight. I checked that the rest of the boys were buying lollipops after institution, but we didn’t have enough money for me to buy them, so I decided to work .”

She says that while still in elementary school, she quitted attending five days a week so that she could work a few days a week and give a little spending money. What maintained her in institution was the free lunch on those epoches; at home, banquets were more irregular, she says with a shrug, as she shakes on a bench beneath a pecan tree in her sister’s figurehead ground. Her daughter sits softly beside her, wide-eyed with her little hoof barely dangling off the bench.

Throughout middle school Maria Rebecca says she continued working in the fields, priding herself on reaching enough money to buy instant noodles for lunch. By ninth grade, she dropped out of school completely and turned to farm work full era, but she does not speak about it with much regret. While some teenagers feel pride by excelling in school or sports, Maria Rebecca felt dignity in excelling at farm work. She narrates her working experiences like a more privileged person might recount their travel escapades.” I remember running the strawberry fields and having to walk up the side of a mound barefoot because it was too muddy to wear boots. The owners kept the ocean loping to keep the strawberries fresh, but we would slip and tumble all the time ,” she says with a laugh.

Maria,
Maria reaps grapefruits in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Despite the harsh work conditions she suffered in Mexico, she says fieldwork in the US is even more demanding because her wage is not paid hourly- ie consistent irrespective of how hard she works- but instead by the box.” Here we are paid by weight, so you have to work very fast. Here it is a lot harder .”

The Rio Grande Valley is renowned for its winter citrus season, when small-town citrus carnivals boast luscious local oranges and grapefruit. Early one morning during this year’s harvest, Maria Rebecca is already up on a ladder, contacting precariously for each return, to drop down into her giant canvas bag.

The physicality of orchard work is astonishingly difficult and dangerous. She leans a ladder slippery with dew and torrent against a tree, where it catches- hopefully tightly- on the diverges. Then she makes her road up the 14 -foot ladder, all the way to the top, to the last rung. Along the style, she is stretching to reach grapefruit, and tugging at them to get them to exhaust and fall. Any that collision the floor can’t be used, so she collects them all in a purse that is slung crossbody and hanging on one side of her hip. The suitcase weighs anywhere between 60 to 80 lb when full of fruit. One missed step on the ladder, or a lean too far to the side, and she’ll fall.

That’s already happened to her twice this year. Once, her paw slipped off the ladder step during a rainstorm, yanking her poise backwards and communicating her to the ground, the crate arrive on top of her. On her style down, she threw the back of her front against the angle of a tractor trailer. She describes knowing concussion syndromes( although she says she has never heard the word “concussion” ). A doctor’s visit was out of the question.” Without articles, I just try to not effect a few problems ,” she clarifies, twisting her opening to the side and ogling down to brush dirt off her daughter’s jeans. She was also unaware of her legal rights in seeking compensation for her injury.

Still, Maria Rebecca is afraid that the work could one day hurt her poorly sufficient to made her children at risk. After her daylight in the orchard, she dotes on her three-year-old daughter, whose black mane she carefully combs back and secures with minuscule barrettes. She lives in her sister’s nice mobile home, and maintains a straighten and stable procedure for their own children( her sister sells Tupperware from the back of a gondola ).

” I can’t imagine not working in the fields ,” she says.” I ever want to keep working, because I never require a guy to be able to control me and ask me how I spend his money. But I reckon I am going to leave this work. I fell again last week. I consider I want to go to Mexico .”

Blanca, 36

Blanca,
Blanca, 36, says she is good at pedicures, but is not able to do that in the US because she is undocumented.’ It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not used to it .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Blanca first entered the US more than a decade ago by simply walking across one of the bridges that relate Mexico to the Rio Grande Valley, she says, a bit nervously, since things are different now.” Now to get here you have to pay …” she says, although she leaves unclear whether she intends compensating the coyotes who traffic parties across national borders or with your life, as many migrants do.

When she firstly came to the US, she found her labor options annoying.” I know how to do pedicures really well, I am really skilled at it actually. But I can’t do that kind of work here, because I don’t have articles .” So she went back to Mexico, taking their own families with her.

But life was not much easier in Tamaulipas state, especially after her husband left two years ago to look for better-paying work back in the US. He find it in the fields, and when we first match and sit in a gondola to speak, he kneels just out of earshot in the soil, pulling beets while keeping a distrustful see on her. She questioned her husband’s allow before agreeing to be interviewed.

Blanca says that during the time that he was gone, leaving her behind in Mexico to raise their five girls, she started to feel scared for her refuge.” We lives in a neat situate in Mexico, but I lives in a rancho with very few people around, so anytime a boy showed up at the house, I was frightened .” Plus, with a home full of boys- her five children range from 20 to three- she started to worry about their own future.” There’s a lot of crime, and I didn’t want my sons working for those robbers. I missed them working for good .” Five months back, she ultimately packed up the children to join him. She shuns the issue of how to they bridged this time.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers pick beets in the Rio Grande Valley. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Like her husband, Blanca has taken on fieldwork, even though she does not recall she is well-suited to it.” It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not used to it .” She still hasn’t experienced a summertime of working in the fields of south Texas, but she is already dreading the hot.” When we walk in the sunshine it is so bad. But too, when it rains it’s bad very, because your legs get wearied from stepping in the silt. And lifting the onions … it’s really heavy .” She tried working the citrus trees like Maria Rebecca but says she quit because it was too hard.

Still, she says she wouldn’t sell fieldwork for life back in Mexico.” I enjoy that here, the kids can go to a good school and that we can find work ,” she says.” I don’t think I will ever go back to Mexico- only if I am action .” She says that she still lives with a high degree of uncertainty:” I rent my home, so we could get kicked out ,” she interprets, as she gesticulates around the broken-down trailer home her children are chasing fly-covered puppies out front of.” It’s hard to live this method because you could go to work and only not come back because the immigration officials pictured up.

” Trump says he doesn’t want immigrants here, and I think it’s obvious he merely hates immigrants. But my question is, why don’t you want us if we work so hard ?”

Shannon Sims is also a member of the International Women’s Media Foundation and funding recipients of the Howard G Buffett Fund for Women Correspondent

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They owned an island , now they are urban poor: the tragedy of Altamira

Construction of the Belo Monte dam has cast gentlemen , women and children who lived rich lives along the Xingu River to the outskirts of Altamira, Brazils most violent city. Here, to the sound of gunfire, they must live behind prohibited openings, and buy food with money theyve never had or needed before

They owned an island , now they are urban poor: the tragedy of Altamira

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Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her pup twice

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Singer and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has discovered she successfully became two clones of her pet hound after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown gazes and her seriousness .”

In the interrogation, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their entrance, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand adopted her and made her the epithet Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her performance career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she triumphed an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I fantasized I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

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