Tag Archives: US news

‘ She’s on fire ‘: Elizabeth Warren on the rise- but has work to do to win black voters

Biden guides among African Americans but Warren has gained ground with ambitious programme intentions and hours-long selfie lines

Linda Edwards is the family authority on all matters of politics. Every election year, she watches the word, studies the candidates, attends campaign incidents and yields a verdict.

A year before the 2020 election, the 68 -year-old retired pharmacist from Charlotte has her study cut out: 19 Democrats vying to be the Democratic presidential nominee. Yet with five months left before voting beginning in the primary hasten, Edwards says she is ready to make an endorsement.

” Elizabeth Warren is the absolute greatest ,” Edwards said of the Massachusetts senator after waiting for more than an hour to take a selfie with her at a recent safarus occurrence in Rock Hill, South Carolina.” I always had her at the top of the list but she is the No 1 now. I absolutely support her .”

Since entering the race nine a few months ago, Warren has steadily gained sand with ambitious policy proposals, a decision to swear-off high-dollar fundraising episodes and her hours-long selfie boundaries. But if she is to prevail the nomination, it will probably be with the help of African American voters such as Edwards, part of an increasingly strong and decisive constituency in the Democratic party.

A spate of recent polls show Warren edging past Joe Biden in the first two early-voting nations of Iowa and New Hampshire, dwelling to predominantly white electorates. But in South Carolina, where African American voters make up an estimated 60% of Democratic primary voters, Biden still experiences a wide lead.

In South Carolina, known as the Palmetto State, which holds the” firstly in the south” primary on 29 February next year, Biden conducts Warren by 21 extents, are consistent with a CNN poll secreted the coming week. Although they draw the same share of support from grey primary voters in the nation, 45% of black Democrats back Biden compared to precisely 4% who favor Warren.

” I don’t know how anyone can become the Democratic nominee- or the next president of the United States, for that matter- without strong, across-the-board support from African American voters ,” said Antjuan Seawright, a Democratic strategist in South Carolina, who is not aligned with a candidate.” South Carolina is the first exam of that support .”

The event at Clinton College in Rock Hill on Saturday spotlit the challenge for Warren as she works to introduce herself to African Americans in the state.

Despite the unbearable heat and humidity, roughly 1,400 attended her outdoor rally, and hundreds remained afterward for selfies. Yet the crowd that blanketed the campus of this historically black college was overwhelmingly white.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth Warren addresses the crowd at the occasion at Clinton College in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Photograph: Meg Kinnard/ Associated Press

Biden outlined a smaller, but most diverse, crowd when he visited the college earlier this year.

Biden’s reign in the nation residuals on his deep ties to colors political leaders and his busines as Barack Obama’s vice-president, which have constructed him popular among older, more conservative black voters.

” We trust him ,” said Steve Love, a local councilman in neighboring York, who endorsed Biden.” Obama is not got going to elect a vice-president who doesn’t have our back .”

Love met Warren before her rally and offered “point-blank” advice.

” If you are intended to clear increases in our community, you are really going to have to come into local communities and sit down and talk to us ,” he told her.

Warren says she has plans to do exactly that.

” What I’m doing is showing up and trying to talk to beings on the reasons why I’m in this fight, about what’s broken, about how to fix it and how we’re building a grassroots movement to get it done ,” Warren told reporters after the revival.” It’s not just one plan. It’s everywhere .”

Woven into her raft of police proposals are specific prescriptions to address ethnic injustice. Her proposal to forgive most student lend indebtednes and obligate college tuition-free attempts to reduce the racial resource gap that disproportionately headache pitch-black students. The recommendation would also invest $50 m in historically pitch-black colleges and universities( HBCUs ), such as Clinton.

Her affordable casing plan specifically aims to redress decades of discriminatory housing practices and redlining in places such as the Mississippi Delta, where “shes gone” early in her safarus to highlight the initiative.

She was one of the first campaigners to endorse congressional legislation that would create a commission to study reparations for the offsprings of slaves. And at a recent forum on LGBTQ issues in Iowa last week, Warren began her observes by speak their lists of 18 black transgender wives killed this year.” It is time for a president of the United States of America to say their mentions ,” she said.

” Black tribes have a very unique experience that requires policies that pinpoint that experience ,” said Maurice Mitchell, the national director of the Working Families party, a progressive political organization that endorsed Warren.

” The candidates who aren’t afraid to talk about race and class at the same time, those are the candidates that are going to compel black people to not just show up at the referendums ,” he continued,” but to becomes involved, to volunteer, to engage and to build a movement with them .”

A
A female listens to Democratic presidential campaigner Elizabeth Warren at an contest in New Hampshire. Photograph: Cheryl Senter/ Associated Press

Black voters, and black women in particular, are the most loyal Democratic voting bloc. In 2016, African Americans comprised almost a quarter, 24%, of Democratic primary voters- a share that is expected to rise in 2020.

There are signs Warren’s efforts are paying off, especially among African American women.

A Quinnipiac poll showed that her foundation among black voters nationally clambered over the summer from 4% in July to 19% in September as Biden’s support slipped from 53 % in July to 40% in September.

At several presidential forums concentrates on voters of colour and in private meetings with activists and pitch-black leads this year, Warren has left her audiences affected, said Aimee Allison, founder of She the People, political advocacy group focused on women of color that hosted an contest with 2020 candidates in Houston earlier this year.

” She is campaigning immediately to women of color ,” she said.” And at the same time, she is attracting white progressives. That has the potential to be a potent coalition .”

Cliff Albright, cofounder of Black Voters Matter, said fresh scrutiny of Biden’s record and his recent observes on race- from comments about working with segregationists to a discordant reply to a debate question about reparations- are starting to chip away at his support, especially among younger color voters.

” The more that black people hear from Elizabeth Warren, the more they are intrigued by her ,” Albright said.” The opposite happens with Joe Biden .”

But public opinion surveys and interrogations with voters hint Biden’s plea is perhaps more durable than numerous expect.

Melissa Rouse, 46 and Tracey Easter, 44, cousins from Charlotte who sat in folding chairs under the shade of a tree as they waited for Warren to speak, said they have not yet settled on a candidate, but Warren was at the top of their list.

That wasn’t the case for many of their older relatives, who they said are firmly committed to Biden.

” My mommy is 76 and she enjoys, affections, charities Joe Biden ,” Rouse said.” They feel like they are aware of him .”

Both said they fantasized Biden would be the strongest candidate against Trump. Nevertheless, they came to be persuaded by Warren.

” When beings have an opportunity to be in her attendance and hear her letter, they ever leave affected ,” said Wendy Brawley, a South Carolina position representative who has endorsed Warren.” Now I’m starting to hear,’ This is a person who I not only like and reinforce, but who can actually triumph .'”

Before leaving Rock Hill, Warren made a final stop for dinner at Gourmet Soul Kitchen. As cooks raced to prepare an order of deep-fried prawn and shush puppies, Warren ran the area, establishing herself to staff and diners, all of whom were black.

Deborah Cousar, a 60 -year-old retired nursing deputy “whos been” rushed to the restaurant with her grandchildren upon hearing of the senator’s see, beamed as Warren told her 11 -year-old granddaughter that she was loping for chairperson because ” that’s what girls do.

Though their meeting was brief, it left an impression on Cousar. While she intends to hear out the other candidates, especially as the primary hasten for South Carolina intensifies, Cousar indicated by the” vibrant female” from Massachusetts will be hard to beat.

” She’s on fire ,” Cousar said.” If she only retains on doing what she’s doing, I think she’s going to persuade them pretty good .”

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Red-hot hounds, high tea and nap defendants: LA’s royalists prepare for the royal wedding

The royalists of Los Angeles, where Meghan Markle was born and heightened, are as invested in the marry as any British monarchist

There is a hot dog mentioned in honor of the big-hearted daytime. There are cot documents on fascinators, Windsor Castle and how to fold napkins. There are last-minute preparations for slumber defendants with bunting, scones, cucumber sandwiches and gin and tonic slush puppies.

The royalists of Los Angeles must be waiting for Meghan Markle’s marriage to Prince Harry on Saturday.

It will happen 5,000 miles and eight age zones away, but these Californians feel as invested as any British monarchist.

The wedding, after all, feels in some respects like a Hollywood production.

The bride is a born and multiplied Angeleno who grew up around film sets and determined success on screen before falling for a sovereign, yielding a modern, biracial sequel to Grace Kelly’s move to Monaco more than half a century ago.

Hollywood continues royal glamour with date dramas, Disney princesses and, quite recently, Netflix’s The Crown. The fame website TMZ, headquartered near the Pacific Ocean, contributes the media pack with imperial scoops, rumor and delicacies , not least the story over whether Markle’s father, who lives 150 miles down the coast in Mexico, will stroll his daughter down the aisle.

For all its English pomp many here feel the opening ceremony in St George’s chapel could carry a” cleared in LA” sticker.

” They say she’s their princess, that it’s history in the making ,” said Dympna Madeley, manager of Ye Olde King’s Head, a British-themed gift shop in Santa Monica which has repeatedly sold out of Harry and Meghan illustrations, goblets, sweaters and other merchandise.

The frenzy outstrips the fuss for Prince William’s wedding to Kate Middleton in 2011, said Madeley.” There’s much more interest now. We’ve had to reorder inventory five times. We didn’t realise how many beings would be pulled into it .”

Shoppers included Redgie De Guzman, 35, a bookseller, who loaded up on union jack garnishes for an all-night party at a friend’s mansion which will culminate when Markle says” I do” shortly before dawn neighbourhood occasion.” We’ll watch it live. Go big-hearted or go home ,” said De Guzman.” The next marry is likely to be, what, Prince George in 20 years ?”

Redgie
Redgie De Guzman stocks rise on wed memorabilia for a viewing party in Los Angeles. Photograph: Rory Carroll for the Guardian

The only wedding fever dissenter when the Guardian visited the store was Paul Bailey, 50, a British expat who was stocking up on Toffee Crisps.” I don’t feel it has anything to do with “peoples lives” .”

Americans were far more excited than LA’s British transplants, said Madeley, the manager.” We think it’s because Markle is American and mixed-race. They don’t care if we tell them she’ll be a duchess , not a princess .”

Lisa Powers, who finagled a neighbouring British-themed pub, said tickets for its bridal considers sold out days ago.” It’s insane. A totally different buzz compared to William and Kate .”

At least three cinemas in LA will host screenings.

Pink’s Hot dog, a fast-food landmark, will offer a “Royal Dog”- two hot dogs and two bacon slices in a bun filled with mustard, cheese, onions, pickle relish and chili, wrapped in a packet congratulating Markle and Prince Harry.

Echoes of Markle’s past life in LA lend frisson to the celebrations.

The Cat& Fiddle, a Hollywood pub and restaurant, will host a” royal slumber party” with fascinators, pyjamas, quiz trivia, sausage wheels and scones- and recollections about the bride, who called about seven years ago with her then spouse, Trevor Engelson, said co-owner Ashley Gardner.” He had a party for one of our reciprocal friends .”

The Rose Tree Cottage, an English tea chamber in the suburb of Pasadena, channelled Pygmalion when Markle called last year apparently for etiquette tips-off, with proprietor Edmund Fry, a British expat, in the role of Professor Higgins. Angelenos have followed in her aftermath.” We’re morass, totally morass ,” an employee said on Wednesday.

Edmund
Edmund Fry pass guests in a toast to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during afternoon tea at the Rose Tree Cottage in Pasadena, surrounded by cardboard cutouts of the royal family. Photograph: Robyn Beck/ AFP/ Getty Images

American fictions with royalty don’t ever cease well. Passion for Wallis Simpsoncost Edward VIII his throne and landed them in exile. Grace Kelly chafed at a lost acting career and been killed in a car accident.

Former coaches predicted Markle will adapt to the scrutiny, pressures and restrictions of monarchy.

” As a student she was very bright, very intelligent, extremely committed ,” said Maria Pollia, who taught Markle theology at Immaculate Heart high school in the 1990 s.

” I don’t think she has any fairytale dreams about the living standards. I consider she’ll know that it comes with some somewhat drastic varies. She is her own person but is very respectful of tradition. I don’t think she’ll be standing on tables trying to remake the royal family, that’s just not her .”

Prince Harry and Markle will focus on humanitarian campaigns, predicted Christine Knudsen, who taught Markle spirituality and literature.” We’re sure that after they get settled she and Harry will continue showing great heart and great shame .”

The school, a private college near Hollywood, celebrated their alumnus earlier the coming week at a party with dancing, lemonade, biscuits and a corgi.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Undocumented, vulnerable, scared: the women who pick your meat for$ 3 an hour

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In the fields of south Texas Mexican maidens toil long hours in dangerous states under the ever-present threat of deportation

On a rainy, pre-dawn Monday morning in areas falling within the scope of the Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border in south Texas, little constellations of flashlights gleam across the light-green plain. They are held by undocumented immigrants, principally from Mexico, and primarily living in fear of arrest and deportation but cultivating all the same to provide for their families. Their digits twist the tie on knots of parsley or hack stalks of kale until their palms blister. Most of Texas is still asleep.

Many of them are paid on a contract basis, by the box. A box of cilantro will make a worker$ 3; experienced farmworkers say they can fill one within an hour, which makes a usual 5am to 6pm work day would earn them $39 total. The duty can go from physically awkward and banal( cilantro, loot, beets) to outright pain and dangerous( watermelon, parsley, grapefruit ).

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard common knots that they reaped in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

The few women who work in the fields face even more hardships. Specimen of workplace sexual harassment and abuse are raging and are both underreported and under-prosecuted. It is common for women to capitulate to a supervisor’s betterments because she can’t risk losing her job or expulsion. Most of these women are supporting children as well.

In the fields of south Texas, those women represent a diverse cross-section of lives upturned by drug-related and domestic violence in Mexico. Under brand-new US immigration protocols, these are extraordinarily tense meters for immigrants- getting caught by officials could necessitate being sent back or having your boys incorporated in a enclosure. And hitherto the women included in this piece refused to hide their faces or conversion their names.

They want their narratives told.

Janet, 36

Janet,
Janet, 36, left, and her father Edith, 55 constitute for a photograph outside Janet’s house. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

” I anticipate I run evenly as fast as the men ,” Janet Castro says, deflecting over and slicing the springs from the greens of the cilantro gather. A 36 -year-old veteran of fieldwork( “shes been” picking grow since she was 17 ), Castro is able to hold a speech without stopping the swift movement of her bayonet. A bandanna treats her nose and mouth to keep the headache-inducing cilantro smell out; otherwise the headache last-places for hours after she’s left the field.

Parsley is worse:” There is a milk in the stanches of the parsley that gets on us when we cut it ,” she illustrates. As a cause, one day in the fields cutting parsley can intend two weeks of itchy, stinging skin that is rough to the touch.” We can’t wear gloves because the boss says a piece of the gauntlet could get into the product ,” she explains, and long sleeves was able to press the milk into the skin.

‘I’m be applicable to it ,” she shrugs, in her stoic road, as she scratches her scaly arm.

Janet has worked with the same supervisor for nine years. She describes him as a good guy who has even lent her $200 when she needed it. Despite bending over for most of the day, she says she doesn’t suffer the same back pain that other farmworkers do.” I’m really fast at the onion, but there are some men who say I am taking their work. The response I have is that this work is for my kids .”

Janet met her husband the first time she started working in the fields. Back at home, they have three children, each with developmental problems; one, the midriff daughter, has autism and needs a part-time caretaker. Her older son has suffered epileptic seizures since he was a baby, and the youngest is starting to show developmental topics as well. Janet says her doctors accept the resources of her children’s problems are the compounds used in the fields, but her undocumented status conducted her to never endeavour legal action. Plus, she didn’t want to lose her job.

Her solace is the Catholic church, and on her one day off- Sunday- she takes her family there. Subsequentlies they hasten home, to avoid any potential run-ins with immigration authorities. She says she has heard rumors of immigration stings at parties and throngs after faith, and although she says she does not live in fear, she still says she doesn’t like to take that risk.

She hopes that someday she might be able to call herself an American citizen.” I exactly hope there is a way for us to get documents, because some of us are truly work it. Others are lazy and stay home, but I’m really working hard ,” she says before putting her youngest to bed, seven hours before she’ll need to arrive at the parsley domain the next morning.

Edith, 55

Edith,
Edith came to the US nearly 20 years ago.’ I came to this country to give my family a better life. Work is very hard, but I don’t mind. We have to work .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Edith is Janet’s mom, though her outspoken manner differentiates sharply with her daughter’s low-key, reticent manner. If Edith comes off as strong-headed, she says that her life has demanded it.

Edith ran as a paramedic in Mexico, but she could barely make ends meet.” I lived in total poverty in Mexico ,” she says, her sees dampening.” My home was just a wood shanty and where reference is rained we would get wet. I came here because this is a country of possibilities .”

Today she lives with her daughter Janet and her daughter’s pedigree, but years ago their lives were turned upside down, shortly after Edith came across the Rio Grande River in the early 1990 s alone in an inner tube at night.

Four months after Edith arrived and experienced operate as a housekeeper for a local singer, she voyaged back to Veracruz, Mexico, to make her three teenage children across the border. Janet and her sister, both girls then, noted task as housekeepers as well, but were getting beset by mortals as they sauntered dwelling from their jobs. One day, Janet’s sister countenanced a trip home and disappeared. Her brother, Edith’s son, observed his sister after weeks of searching in an apartment building in another town. It is a fact that she and another girl had been being held there against their will and abused. Edith’s son went to the police to report the crime, and Edith says the abductors were jailed for a week, her son was also penalise: he was evicted.” The researcher simply told me to call if my daughter got abducted again ,” Edith recalls with disgust,” and that’s when I decided to move towns “.

Starting over, Edith shed herself into work in the fields.” I don’t mind the hard work ,” she says,” I came to this country to fight .” Over her two decades of work in the fields, Edith has earned herself a honour among the men as a tough chingona – a badass woman. Once, who used to work the watermelon fields where rattlesnakes are notorious, Edith use her paramedic sciences to save the life of a worker who was bitten by a snake:” I employed my lip to it[ his leg] and sucked out the venom and spit it out .” Such bravery has turned her into a kind of mentor to other women working in the fields.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard light-green bunches that they gleaned in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

She also informally admonishes other female farmworkers against capitulating to the pressure of men soliciting sex in exchange for better working conditions.” I ever tell them,’ We have worked hard to be here , now don’t let yourself down .'” She says she still ascertains young women taken off by the supervisors to recess of the fields, but she has hope:” People know their rights a lot better now than they used to .”

Commonplace labor questions such as intimidation, refusal of collective labour agreements privileges, wage denying or payable overtime work are also extraordinary obstructions that they have few recourses to fight.

A report by Human Rights Watch notes that although US law entitles undocumented employees to workplace protections,” the US government’s interest in protecting illegal craftsmen from abuse conflicts with its interest in deporting them .” That report was written in 2015, but President Trump’s heightened drive for deportation and margin closure has only drawn things more hopeless for undocumented farmworkers attempting to protect their labor rights.

That’s part of why Edith still considers giving up everything and returning with her family to Mexico.

” When you’re illegal here, it’s like you’re in prison. If you need help, there’s nowhere to go .”

Maria Rebecca, 23

María
Maria Rebecca, 23, and her daughter. She was eight when she started facilitating her father picking strawberries in Michoacan. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Maria Rebecca came to the US when she was pregnant with her second child three years ago, leaving her older son with her mothers back in Michoacan.

” My mummy expended her whole life working in the fields[ in Mexico ], and the only reason she stopped was because one of the veins in her gaze popped while she was working .”

Her sister and her daddy are still back in Michoacan working the fields, and it was her other sister who announced her to Texas, where she had already moved to.

” My sister is well aware that I cherished working in the area, and she was just telling me I could make a lot more coin here .” Back in Mexico she would make about $30 a week. Here, she could acquire $200 a week- if, that is, she was willing to take on the most dangerous types of work- gathering in the orchards. She was: farm work is Maria Rebecca’s life.

” I started working in the fields when I was eight. I appreciated that the rest of the girls were buying lollipops after school, but we didn’t have enough coin for me to buy them, so I decided to work .”

She says that while still in elementary school, she discontinued attending five days a week so that she could work a few periods a few weeks and deserve a little spending money. What prevented her in academy was the free lunch on those epoches; at home, dinners were more irregular, she says with a shrug, as she swingings on a bench beneath a pecan tree in her sister’s figurehead garden. Her daughter sits softly beside her, wide-eyed with her little hoof just dangling off the bench.

Throughout middle school Maria Rebecca says she continued working in the fields, priding herself on manufacturing enough coin to buy instant noodles for lunch. By ninth grade, she removed out of school completely and turned to farm work full era, but she does not speak about it with much sadnes. While some teenagers feel pride by excelling in institution or athletics, Maria Rebecca felt pride in excelling at farm duty. She narrates her working experiences like a more privileged person might recount their travel escapades.” I remember toiling the strawberry fields and having to walk up the two sides of a mound barefoot because it was too muddy to wear boots. The owners remained the liquid extending to keep the strawberries fresh, but we would slip and drop all the time ,” she says with a laugh.

Maria,
Maria collects grapefruits in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Despite the harsh work conditions she tolerated in Mexico, she says fieldwork in the US is even more demanding because her wage is not paid hourly- ie consistent regardless of how hard she works- but rather by the box.” Here we are paid by weight, so you have to work very fast. Here it is a lot harder .”

The Rio Grande Valley is famous for its wintertime citrus season, when small-town citrus carnivals peculiarity delicious neighbourhood oranges and grapefruit. Early one morning during this year’s collect, Maria Rebecca is already up on a ladder, reaching precariously for each fruit, to drop down into her giant canvas bag.

The physicality of orchard work is astonishingly difficult and dangerous. She bends a ladder slick with dew and rainwater against a tree, where it catches- hopefully tightly- on the forks. Then she makes her style up the 14 -foot ladder, all the way to the top, to the last rung. Along the space, she is stretching to reach grapefruit, and tugging at them to get them to liberate and sink. Any that strike the sand can’t be used, so she obtains them all in a luggage that is slung crossbody and hanging on one side of her hip. The suitcase weighs anywhere between 60 to 80 lb when full of fruit. One missed step on the ladder, or a lean too far to the side, and she’ll fall.

That’s already happened to her twice this year. Once, her paw slipped off the ladder stair during a rainstorm, yanking her match backwards and moving her to the ground, the container disembark on top of her. On her route down, she slammed the back of her leader against the corner of a tractor trailer. She describes knowledge concussion syndromes( though she says she has never heard the word “concussion” ). A doctor’s visit was out of the question.” Without articles, I merely is seeking to not justification current problems ,” she excuses, twisting her mouth to the side and examining down to brush dirt off her daughter’s jeans. She was also unaware of her legal rights in seeking compensation for her injury.

Still, Maria Rebecca is afraid that the work could one day hurt her severely sufficient to introduced her children at risk. After her era in the orchard, she dotes on her three-year-old daughter, whose pitch-black mane she carefully combs back and ensuring with minuscule barrettes. She lives in her sister’s nice mobile home, and maintains a tidy and stable number for their own children( her sister sells Tupperware from the back of a auto ).

” I can’t imagine not working in the fields ,” she says.” I always want to keep working, because I never crave a male to be able to control me and ask students how I spent his fund. But I guess I am going to leave this work. I fell again last week. I believe I want to go to Mexico .”

Blanca, 36

Blanca,
Blanca, 36, says she is good at pedicures, but is not eligible to do that in the US because she is undocumented.’ It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not used to it .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Blanca first entered the US more than a decade ago by simply treading across one of the bridges that connect Mexico to the Rio Grande Valley, she says, a bit nervously, since things are different now.” Now to get here you have to pay …” she says, though she leaves unclear whether she makes paying the coyotes who traffic parties across the border or with their own lives, as many migrants do.

When she first came to the US, she found her labor options frustrating.” I know how to do pedicures really well, I are certainly skilled at it actually. But I can’t do that kind of used to work, because I don’t have newspapers .” So she went back to Mexico, taking her family with her.

But life was not much easier in Tamaulipas state, especially after her husband left two years ago to look for better-paying work back in the US. He felt it in the fields, and where reference is first fulfill and sit in a auto to speak, he kneels just out of earshot in the clay, plucking beets while keeping a distrustful see on her. She expected her husband’s allow before agreeing to be interviewed.

Blanca says that during the time that he was gone, leaving her behind in Mexico to raise their five teenagers, she started to feel scared for her safe.” We lived in a nice target in Mexico, but I lived in a rancho with very few people around, so anytime a follower depicted up at the chamber of representatives, I was feared .” Plus, with a residence full of adolescents- her five children range from 20 to three- she started to worry about their future.” There’s a lot of crime, and I didn’t want my sons working for those hoods. I required them working for good .” Five a few months ago, she eventually packed up the children to join him. She shuns the question of how they spanned this time.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers pick beets in the Rio Grande Valley. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Like her husband, Blanca has taken on fieldwork, even though she does not speculate she is well-suited to it.” It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not be applicable to it .” She still hasn’t knowledge a summertime of working in the fields of south Texas, but she is already dreading the hot.” When we walk in the sunlight it is so bad. But likewise, where reference is rains it’s bad extremely, because your legs get wearied from strolling in the silt. And lifting the onions … it’s really heavy .” She tried working the citrus trees like Maria Rebecca but says she quit because it was too hard.

Still, she says she wouldn’t sell fieldwork for life back in Mexico.” I enjoy that here, the kids can go to a good academy and that we can find work ,” she says.” I don’t think I will ever go back to Mexico- only if I am thrust .” She says that she still lives with a high degree of uncertainty:” I lease my home, so we could get knocked out ,” she clarifies, as she gestures around the broken-down trailer home her children are chasing fly-covered puppies out front of.” It’s hard to live this way because you could go to work and simply not come back because the immigration officials demo up.

” Trump says he doesn’t want immigrants here, and I think it’s obvious he precisely detests immigrants. But my question is, why don’t you want us if “were working” so difficult ?”

Shannon Sims is a fellow of the International Women’s Media Foundation and a recipient of the Howard G Buffett Fund for Women Correspondent

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Undocumented, vulnerable, scared: the women who pick your food for$ 3 an hour

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In the fields of south Texas Mexican women make long hours in dangerous healths under the ever-present threat of deportation

On a rainy, pre-dawn Monday morning in the fields of the Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border in south Texas, little constellations of flashlights wink across the dark-green plain. They are held by undocumented immigrants, predominantly from Mexico, and principally living in fear of arrest and expulsion but acting all the same to provide for their families. Their thumbs twist the affiliation on knots of parsley or hack stalks of kale until their palms blister. Most of Texas is still asleep.

Many of them are paid on a contract basis, by the box. A carton of cilantro will earn a worker$ 3; suffered farmworkers say they can fill one within an hour, which necessitates a usual 5am to 6pm work day would deserve them $39 total. The handiwork can run from physically unpleasant and everyday( cilantro, loot, beets) to outright unpleasant and dangerous( watermelon, parsley, grapefruit ).

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard green knots that they collected in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

The few women who work in the fields face even more adversities. Specimen of workplace sexual harassment and crime are rampant and are both underreported and under-prosecuted. It is common for women to relent to a supervisor’s improvements because she can’t risk losing her job or eviction. Most of these women are supporting children as well.

In the fields of south Texas, those women represent a diverse cross-section of lives upturned by drug-related and domestic violence in Mexico. Under brand-new US immigration protocols, these are extraordinarily tense periods for immigrants- being caught by officials could intend being was sent out or having your boys placed in a cage. And hitherto the women included in this piece refused to hide their faces or modify their names.

They want their narratives told.

Janet, 36

Janet,
Janet, 36, left, and her father Edith, 55 constitute for a photograph outside Janet’s house. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

” I envisage I wield evenly as fast as the three men ,” Janet Castro says, deflecting over and slicing the beginnings from the greens of the cilantro gather. A 36 -year-old veteran of fieldwork( “shes been” picking make since she was 17 ), Castro is able to hold a conference without stopping the swift movement of her knife. A bandanna plows her snout and mouth to keep the headache-inducing cilantro smell out; otherwise the headache lasts for hours after she’s left the field.

Parsley is worse:” There is a milk in the stems of the parsley that gets on us when we cut it ,” she justifies. As a make, one day in the fields cutting parsley can entail two weeks of itchy, stinging skin that is rough to the touch.” We can’t wear gloves because the boss says a piece of the glove could get into the product ,” she justifies, and long sleeves was able to press the milk into the skin.

‘I’m be applicable to it ,” she shrugs, in her stoic space, as she scratches her scaly arm.

Janet has worked with the same supervisor for nine years. She describes him as a good guy who has even lent her $200 when she requires it. Despite bending over for most of the day, she says she doesn’t suffer the same back pain that other farmworkers do.” I’m really fast at the onion, but there are some men who say I am taking their work. The response I have is that this work is for my boys .”

Janet met her husband the first time she started working in the fields. Back at home, they have three children, each with developmental problems; one, the centre daughter, has autism and needs a part-time caretaker. Her older son has suffered epileptic convulsions since he was a baby, and the youngest is starting to show developmental issues as well. Janet says her doctors feel the resources of her children’s questions are the substances used in the fields, but her undocumented status contributed her to never try legal action. Plus, she didn’t want to lose her job.

Her solace is the Catholic church, and on her one day off- Sunday- she takes her family there. Subsequentlies they rush residence, to avoid any potential run-ins with immigration authorities. She says she has heard rumors of immigration bites at states parties and meets after church, and although she says she does not live in fear, she still says she doesn’t like to go that risk.

She hopes that someday she might be able to call herself an American citizen.” I merely hope there is a way for us to get reports, because some of us are really working here. Others are lazy and stay home, but I’m really working hard ,” she says before putting her youngest to bed, seven hours before she’ll need to arrive at the parsley realm the next morning.

Edith, 55

Edith,
Edith came to the US virtually 20 years ago.’ I came to this country to give my family a better life. Work is very hard, but I don’t mind. We have to work .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Edith is Janet’s mom, though her outspoken manner distinguishes sharply with her daughter’s low-key, reticent demeanor. If Edith comes off as strong-headed, she says that her life has demanded it.

Edith operated as a paramedic in Mexico, but she could scarcely make ends meet.” I lived in total privation in Mexico ,” she says, her seeings soaking.” My home was just a lumber shanty and when it rained we would get wet. I came here because this is a country of possibilities .”

Today she lives with her daughter Janet and her daughter’s house, but years ago their lives were turned upside down, shortly after Edith came across the Rio Grande River in the early 1990 s alone in an inner tube at night.

Four months after Edith arrived and known effort as a housekeeper for a local vocalist, she travelled back to Veracruz, Mexico, to wreak her three teenage children across the border. Janet and her sister, both girls then, found toil as housekeepers as well, but were getting provoked by males as they marched residence from their jobs. One daytime, Janet’s sister countenanced a ride dwelling and disappeared. Her brother, Edith’s son, detected his sister after weeks of searching in an apartment building in another town. It is a fact that she and another girl had been being held there against their will and mistreated. Edith’s son went to the police to report the crime, and Edith says the abductors were jailed for a week, her son was also penalized: he was evicted.” The investigate only told me to call if my daughter got abducted again ,” Edith recollects with disgust,” and that’s when I decided to move towns “.

Starting over, Edith threw herself into work in the fields.” I don’t mind the hard work ,” she says,” I came to this country to fight .” Over her two decades of work in the fields, Edith has earned herself a honour among the men as a tough chingona – a badass wife. Once, while working the watermelon fields where rattlesnakes are notorious, Edith employed her paramedic abilities to save the life of a worker who was bitten by a serpent:” I put my opening to it[ his leg] and sucked out the toxin and spit it out .” Such mettle has turned her into a kind of mentor to other women working in the fields.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers hand over the collard light-green clusters that they reaped in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

She also informally lawyers other female farmworkers against relenting to the pressure of men soliciting sex in exchange for better working conditions.” I always tell them,’ We have worked hard to be here , now don’t let yourself down .'” She says she still determines young women taken off by the supervisors to angles of the fields, but she has hope:” People know their rights a lot better now than they used to .”

Commonplace labor problems such as intimidation, refusal of collective labour agreements privileges, compensation denying or unpaid overtime work are also enormous overcomes that they have few recourses to fight.

A report by Human Rights Watch notes that although US law entitles undocumented proletarians to workplace defences,” the US government’s interest in protecting illegal craftsmen from corruption conflicts with its interest in deporting them .” That report was written in 2015, but President Trump’s increased drive for deportation and border closure had just been formed things more hopeless for undocumented farmworkers attempting to protect their labor rights.

That’s part of why Edith still considers giving up everything and returning with her family to Mexico.

” When you’re illegal here, it’s like you’re in prison. If you need assistance, there’s nowhere to go .”

Maria Rebecca, 23

María
Maria Rebecca, 23, and her daughter. She was eight when she started facilitating her father picking strawberries in Michoacan. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Maria Rebecca came to the US when she was pregnant with her second child three years ago, leaving her older son with her mothers back in Michoacan.

” My mom expended her whole life working in the area[ in Mexico ], and the only reason she stopped was because one of the veins in her attention popped while she was working .”

Her sister and her pa are still back in Michoacan working the fields, and it was her other sister who called her to Texas, where she had already moved to.

” My sister knew that I adored working in the area, and she was just telling me I could make a lot more money here .” Back in Mexico she would make about $30 a week. Here, she could become $200 a few weeks- if, that is, she was willing to take on the most dangerous types of work- harvesting in the orchards. She was: farm work is Maria Rebecca’s life.

” I started working in the fields when I was eight years old. I envisioned that the rest of the girls were buying lollipops after institution, but we didn’t have enough fund for me to buy them, so I decided to work .”

She says that while still in elementary school, she quitted attending five days a few weeks so that she could work a few daytimes a few weeks and deserve a little spending money. What deterred her in institution was the free lunch on those dates; at home, snacks were more irregular, she says with a shrug, as she jives on a bench beneath a pecan tree in her sister’s figurehead ground. Her daughter sits softly beside her, wide-eyed with her little hoof just dangling off the bench.

Throughout middle school Maria Rebecca says she continued working in the fields, priding herself on stirring enough fund to buy instant noodles for lunch. By ninth grade, she put out of school completely and turned to farm work full season, but she does not speak about it with much dejection. While some teenagers feel pride by excelling in academy or sports, Maria Rebecca felt dignity in excelling at farm occupation. She recounts her working experiences like a more privileged person might recount their travel undertakings.” I remember cultivating the strawberry fields and having to walk up the two sides of a hill barefoot because it was too muddy to wear boots. The proprietors remained the ocean loping to keep the strawberries fresh, but we would slip and fall all the time ,” she says with a laugh.

Maria,
Maria gleans grapefruits in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Despite the harsh work conditions she tolerated in Mexico, she says fieldwork in the US is even more demanding because her compensation is not paid hourly- ie consistent regardless of how hard she works- but preferably by the box.” Here we are paid by weight, so you have to work very fast. Here it is a lot harder .”

The Rio Grande Valley is famous for its wintertime citrus season, when small-town citrus galas feature delicious local oranges and grapefruit. Early one morning during this year’s glean, Maria Rebecca is already up on a ladder, contacting precariously for each fruit, to drop down into her giant canvas bag.

The physicality of orchard work is astonishingly difficult and dangerous. She reclines a ladder slick with dew and rainwater against a tree, where it catches- hopefully tightly- on the branches. Then she makes her practice up the 14 -foot ladder, all the way to the top, to the last rung. Along the behavior, she is stretching to reach grapefruit, and tugging at them to get them to release and sink. Any that ten-strike the soil can’t be used, so she collects them all in a pocket that is slung crossbody and hanging on one side of her hip. The purse weighs anywhere between 60 to 80 lb when full of return. One missed step on the ladder, or a lean too far to the side, and she’ll fall.

That’s already happened to her twice this year. Once, her hoof slipped off the ladder gradation during a rainstorm, yanking her match downwards and sending her to the ground, the handbag platform on top of her. On her route down, she slammed the back of her president against the reces of a tractor trailer. She describes knowing concussion disorders( though she says she has never heard the word “concussion” ). A doctor’s visit was out of the question.” Without papers, I simply try to not induce current problems ,” she illustrates, twisting her mouth to the side and seeming down to brush dirt off her daughter’s jeans. She was also unaware of her legal rights in seeking compensation for her injury.

Still, Maria Rebecca is afraid that the work could one day hurt her naughtily sufficient to threw her children at risk. After her era in the orchard, she dotes on her three-year-old daughter, whose pitch-black mane she carefully combs back and secures with tiny barrettes. She lives in her sister’s nice mobile home, and maintains a straighten and stable number for her child( her sister sells Tupperware from the back of a gondola ).

” I can’t imagine not working in the fields ,” she says.” I always want to keep working, because I never miss a mortal to be able to control me and ask students how I spent his coin. But I repute I am going to leave this work. I descended again last week. I recollect I want to go to Mexico .”

Blanca, 36

Blanca,
Blanca, 36, says she is good at pedicures, but is not eligible to do that in the US because she is undocumented.’ It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not be applicable to it .’ Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Blanca first entered the US more than a decade ago by simply going across one of the bridges that relate Mexico to the Rio Grande Valley, she says, a bit nervously, since things are different now.” Now to get here you have to pay …” she says, although she leaves unsure whether she symbolizes the coyotes who traffic beings across the border or paying with their own lives, as many migrants do.

When she first came to the US, she found her effort options forestalling.” I have been able to do pedicures really well, I are certainly skilled at it actually. But I can’t do that kind of work here, because I don’t have articles .” So she went back to Mexico, taking her family with her.

But life was not much easier in Tamaulipas state, especially after her husband left two years ago to look for better-paying work back in the US. He obtained it in the fields, and where reference is first gratify and be engaged in a vehicle to speak, he kneels just out of earshot in the dirt, plucking beets while keeping a wary gaze on her. She requested her husband’s allow before agreeing to be interviewed.

Blanca says that during the time that he was gone, leaving her behind in Mexico to raise their five girls, she started to feel scared for her security.” We lives in a neat target in Mexico, but I lived in a rancho with very few people around, so anytime a person depicted up at the house, I was feared .” Plus, with a home full of adolescents- her five children range from 20 to three- she started to worry about their future.” There’s a lot of crime, and I didn’t want my sons working for those goons. I wanted them working for good .” Five a few months ago, she lastly packed up the children to join him. She avoids the issue of how they spanned this time.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers picking beets in the Rio Grande Valley. Photograph: Veronica G Cardenas/ The Guardian

Like her husband, Blanca has taken on fieldwork, even though she does not make she is well-suited to it.” It’s harder for women to work the fields. Some can, but I’m just not used to it .” She still hasn’t experienced a summertime of working in the fields of south Texas, but she is already dreading the heat.” When we walk in the sunbathe it is so bad. But too, where reference is rains it’s bad too, because your legs get wearied from marching in the silt. And lifting the onions … it’s really heavy .” She tried working the citrus trees like Maria Rebecca but says she quit because it was too hard.

Still, she says she wouldn’t sell fieldwork for life back in Mexico.” I affection that here, the boys can go to a good academy and that we can find work ,” she says.” I don’t think I will ever go back to Mexico- only if I am coerced .” She says that she still lives with a high degree of uncertainty:” I rent my home, so we could get knocked out ,” she clarifies, as she gestures around the broken-down trailer home her children are chasing fly-covered puppies out front of.” It’s hard to live this practice because you could go to work and merely not come back because the immigration officials pictured up.

” Trump says he doesn’t want immigrants here, and I think it’s obvious he only hates immigrants. But my question is, why don’t you want us if we work so difficult ?”

Shannon Sims is a fellow of the International Women’s Media Foundation and funding recipients of the Howard G Buffett Fund for Women Journalists

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Colombian vet accused of ‘cruel’ surgery to turn puppies into drug mules

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Andres Lopez Elorez faces US court for implanting pups with heroin after being expelled from Spain

A veterinarian is accused of implanting liquid heroin in puppies to turn them into drug mules for a Colombian trafficking ring.

Colombian-born Andres Lopez Elorez appeared in a US federal courtroom in Brooklyn on Tuesday after being extradited from Spain, where he was arrested in 2015.

Lopez Elorez, 38, who also goes by the surname Lopez Elorza, fled in 2005 when approvals arrested about two dozen believed traffickers in Colombia.

His arrest was part of a 12 -year Drug Enforcement Administration investigation. If convicted on conspiracy accusations, he gambles spending at least 10 years and potentially life behind bars.

Authorities allege that between September 2004 and January 2005 Elorez was a member of a Colombian ring smuggling heroin into the US utilizing many techniques, including human and dog couriers.

It is believed the dogs were communicated on commercial-grade flights to New York, where the stimulants were cut out of them. Investigates belief the puppies would have died in the process, but it was unknown how many were involved.

” As alleged in the indictment, Elorez is not only a drug trafficker, he likewise betrayed a veterinarian’s pledge to prevent animal woe where reference is applied his surgical knowledge in a atrociou scheme to smuggle heroin in the abdomens of puppies ,” US lawyer Richard Donoghue said.” Puppies are man’s most special friend and, as the defendant is about to learn, we are drug dealers’ worst adversary .”

Ten puppies search for and during a 2005 attacked on a farm in Colombia, DEA officials said. Five culminated up running away, three died from infection and two were adopted, including information that became a drug-sniffing dog for Colombian police, officials said.

” Over experience, medication organisations’ unquenchable thirst for profit makes them to do impossible crimes like employing innocent puppies for drug hiding ,” the chief of the DEA’s New York discord, James Hunt, said.

Associated Press and Agence France-Presse contributed to this report .

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Red-hot puppies, high tea and nap parties: LA’s royalists prepare for the royal uniting

The royalists of Los Angeles, where Meghan Markle was born and elevated, are as invested in the wedding as any British monarchist

There is a hot dog called in honor of the big daylight. There are cot greenbacks on fascinators, Windsor Castle and how to fold cloths. There are last-minute preparations for slumber defendants with bunting, scones, cucumber sandwiches and gin and tonic slush puppies.

The royalists of Los Angeles are ready for Meghan Markle’s marriage to Prince Harry on Saturday.

It will happen 5,000 miles and eight duration zones away, but these Californians feel as invested as any British monarchist.

The wedding, after all, feels in some respects like a Hollywood production.

The bride is a born and bred Angeleno who grew up around film sets and discovered success on screen before falling for a monarch, opening a modern, biracial sequel to Grace Kelly’s move to Monaco more than half a century ago.

Hollywood continues imperial mystique with season dramas, Disney ladies and, quite recently, Netflix’s The Crown. The personality website TMZ, headquartered near the Pacific Ocean, produces the media pack with imperial scoops, chitchat and tidbits , not least the tale over whether Markle’s father, who lives 150 miles down the coast in Mexico, will move his daughter down the aisle.

For all its English solemnity many here feel the ceremony in St George’s chapel could carry a” manufactured in LA” sticker.

” They say she’s their princess, that it’s history in the making ,” said Dympna Madeley, administrator of Ye Olde King’s Head, a British-themed gift shop in Santa Monica which has repeatedly sold out of Harry and Meghan layers, beakers, sweaters and other merchandise.

The frenzy outruns the fuss for Prince William’s wedding to Kate Middleton in 2011, said Madeley.” There’s much more interest now. We’ve had to reorder stock five times. We didn’t realise how many people would be drew into it .”

Shoppers included Redgie De Guzman, 35, a bookseller, who loaded up on union jack decorations for an all-night party at a friend’s live which will culminate when Markle says” I do” shortly before dawn local period.” We’ll watch it live. Go large-hearted or go home ,” said De Guzman.” The next wed will be, what, Prince George in 20 times ?”

Redgie
Redgie De Guzman stocks up on wedding memorabilia for a viewing party in Los Angeles. Photograph: Rory Carroll for the Guardian

The only wedding fever dissenter when the Guardian saw the storage was Paul Bailey, 50, a British expat who was stocking up on Toffee Crisps.” I don’t feel it has anything to do with my life .”

Americans were far more excited than LA’s British transplants, said Madeley, the manager.” We think it’s because Markle is American and mixed-race. They don’t care if we tell them she’ll be a duchess , not a princess .”

Lisa Powers, who coped a neighbouring British-themed pub, said tickets for its bridal views sold out days ago.” It’s insane. A totally different buzz compared to William and Kate .”

At least three cinemas in LA will host screenings.

Pink’s Hot dog, a fast-food landmark, will volunteer a “Royal Dog”- two hot dogs and two bacon slices in a bun filled with mustard, cheese, onions, pickle bask and chili, wrapped in a packet praising Markle and Prince Harry.

Echoes of Markle’s past life in LA contribute frisson to the celebrations.

The Cat& Fiddle, a Hollywood pub and restaurant, offered to host a” royal slumber party” with fascinators, pyjamas, quiz trivia, sausage rolls and scones- and recollections about the bride, who visited about seven years ago with her then partner, Trevor Engelson, said co-owner Ashley Gardner.” He had a party for one of our reciprocal friends .”

The Rose Tree Cottage, an English tea room in the outskirt of Pasadena, channelled Pygmalion when Markle called last year apparently for etiquette tips-off, with proprietor Edmund Fry, a British expat, in the role of Professor Higgins. Angelenos have followed in her aftermath.” We’re morass, totally submerge ,” an employee said on Wednesday.

Edmund
Edmund Fry leadings guests in a toast to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during afternoon tea at the Rose Tree Cottage in Pasadena, surrounded by cardboard cutouts of the royal family. Photograph: Robyn Beck/ AFP/ Getty Images

American romances with royalty don’t ever resolve well. Passion for Wallis Simpsoncost Edward VIII his throne and property them in exile. Grace Kelly irked at a lost acting career and been killed in a car accident.

Former schoolteachers predicted Markle will adapt to the scrutiny, influences and limitations of monarchy.

” As a student she was very bright, highly intelligent, very participated ,” said Maria Pollia, who taught Markle theology at Immaculate Heart high school in the 1990 s.

” I don’t think she has any fairytale dreams about the life. I see she’ll know that it comes with some moderately drastic changes. She is her own being but is very respectful of tradition. I don’t think she’ll be standing on counters trying to remake the royal family, that’s just not her .”

Prince Harry and Markle will focus on humanitarian programmes, prophesied Christine Knudsen, who taught Markle spirituality and literature.” We’re sure that after they get settled she and Harry will continue showing great heart and enormous conscience .”

The school, a private college near Hollywood, celebrated their alumnus earlier this week at “states parties ” with dancing, lemonade, biscuits and a corgi.

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Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her dog twice

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Singer and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has revealed she successfully made two clones of her pet dog after it died last year.

The singer and actor told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14-year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

“They have different personalities,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet. “I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown eyes and her seriousness.”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their arrival, Streisand said she became smitten with another dog, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand adopted her and gave her the name Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her acting career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she won an Oscar, with Hello Dolly!, but said she never liked the film.

“I thought I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it,” she told Variety. “I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical.”

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‘So brilliant, so smart’: Trump assembles his equal in hero dog wounded in Isis attacked

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Belgian Malinois, who was injured in attacked on Abu Bakr al-Baghdadis compound, praised by president as the eventual at combat-ready and drug-sniffing

Donald Trump defeated his apparent dislike of hounds on Monday for an appearance in the White House Rose Garden with Conan, the Belgian Malinois which participated in the special forces raid in Syria that resulted in the death of Isis leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

According to the chairman of the joint chiefs, Conan was ” slightly wounded” when Baghdadi killed himself with an explosive in his Syrian compound. On Monday, initiating” probably the world’s most famous pup”, Trump said he had given Conan a plaque and called the canine commando” so bright, so smart-alecky “.

According to the White House pool report, Trump likewise” repeatedly praised Conan’s accomplishment and described the Belgian Malinois raise as the’ eventual’ at fighting and drug-sniffing”, but did not” directly answer a question … of determining whether he would adopt Conan “.

The president predicted Conan would not retire yet, as the dog was in ” prime time “. Trump also alerted reporters- a favourite target for menaces and defamation- that Conan was trained to attack parties if they opened their mouths.

Vice-President Mike Pence said Trumpalso met some of the special forces patrolmen involved in the Baghdadi raid. Their identities will remain secret, per common practice regarding such gangs as Delta Force, the US army unit involved.

If Conan does return to active duty, the military may need to choose a pseudonym. Almost a month before the affair at the White House, Trump blew the dog’s cover on Twitter.

Trump’s praise for Conan has aroused widespread mention, generated his dres of addressing the issue of puppies in pejorative fashion.

Conan
Conan at the White House on Monday. Photograph: Tom Brenner/ Reuters

The president’s claims about what he heard of Baghdadi’s” wail, screaming, and crying” may have been questioned, but Trump insisted that the Isis leader” died like a bird-dog “. He likewise announced Baghdadi and other Isis illustrations” very frightened puppies “.

He has regularly claimed to have fuelled people” like a hound “, notoriously saying of former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman:” Good work by General Kelly for instantly shooting that pup !” He has also alleged political contender Mitt Romney of choking” like a dog” and said Ted Cruz” lies like a pup “.

The trait was visible before Trump guided for chairman. In April 2015, he called author and network mogul Arianna Huffington” a dog who wrongfully mentions on me “.

He has also compared himself to a bird-dog. In the infamous” Grab’ em by the pussy” tape exhausted shortly before the 2016 poll, Trump could be heard to describe an futile attempt to seduce a married woman.

” I moved closer her like a bitch ,” he said.

Back in the Rose Garden, Conan seemed unmoved by all the fuss despite, as the pool report pointed out, the fact that there is a familiar handler who” participated in the Baghdadi raid and cannot appear publicly “.

Then came stunning report. Though” the president used male pronouns to identify the dog during the earlier event”, the pool report said,” a White House official substantiated … on background that Conan the dog is female “.

” Your pooler repudiates the earlier statement that Conan was a very good boy ,” the report read.” Conan is apparently a very good girl. Good daughter Conan .”

And a couple of hours later another, hopefully final, construction. The White House was underlined that Conan was, after all, a male. This inspired more jokes on Twitter and the reserve report to note that” Conan is a good boy again” and then settle for: “Conan is a good dog.”

Kathryn Watson (@ kathrynw5)

And there’s the updated pool note: pic.twitter.com/ Q5RNihJp6X

November 25, 2019

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‘ She’s on fire ‘: Elizabeth Warren on the rise- but has work to do to win black voters

Biden precedes among African Americans but Warren has gained ground with ambitious program programs and hours-long selfie lines

Linda Edwards is the family authority on all matters of politics. Every election year, she watches the bulletin, studies the candidates, attends campaign affairs and yields a verdict.

A year before the 2020 poll, the 68 -year-old retired pharmacist from Charlotte has her act cut out: 19 Democrats vying to be the Democratic presidential campaigner. Yet with five months left before voting begins in the primary race, Edwards says she is ready to make an endorsement.

” Elizabeth Warren is the absolute greatest ,” Edwards said of the Massachusetts senator after waiting for more than an hour to take a selfie with her at a recent campaign happening in Rock Hill, South Carolina.” I always had her at the top of the list but she is the No 1 now. I altogether subscribe her .”

Since entering the hasten nine several months ago, Warren has steadily gained dirt with ambitious policy proposals, a decision to swear-off high-dollar fundraising contests and her hours-long selfie wrinkles. But if she is to acquire the nomination, it will likely be with the help of African American voters such as Edwards, part of an increasingly powerful and decisive constituency in the Democratic party.

A spate of recent polls show Warren edging past Joe Biden in the first two early-voting nations of Iowa and New Hampshire, dwelling to primarily white electorates. But in South Carolina, where African American voters make up an estimated 60% of Democratic primary voters, Biden still enjoys a wide lead.

In South Carolina, known as the Palmetto State, which holds the” firstly in the south” primary on 29 February next year, Biden induces Warren by 21 parts, according to a CNN poll released the coming week. Although they draw the same share of support from white-hot primary voters in the district, 45% of black Democrat back Biden compared to exactly 4% who favor Warren.

” I don’t know how anyone can become the Democratic campaigner- or the next president of the United Country, for that are important- without strong, across-the-board support from African American voters ,” said Antjuan Seawright, a Democratic strategist in South Carolina, who is not aligned with a candidate.” South Carolina is the firstly experiment of that they are consistent with .”

The event at Clinton College in Rock Hill on Saturday foreground the challenge for Warren as she works to introduce herself to African Americans in the state.

Despite the unbearable heat and humidity, nearly 1,400 attended her outdoor rally, and hundreds remained afterward for selfies. Yet the crowd that blanketed the campus of this historically black college was overwhelmingly white.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth Warren addresses the crowd at the contest at Clinton College in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Photograph: Meg Kinnard/ Associated Press

Biden sucked a smaller, but more diverse, mobbed when he visited the college earlier this year.

Biden’s reign in the government rests on his deep ties to black political leaders and his service as Barack Obama’s vice-president, which have realized him favourite among older, more conservative black voters.

” We trust him ,” said Steve Love, a local councilman in neighboring York, who endorsed Biden.” Obama is not got going to elect a vice-president who doesn’t have our back .”

Love met Warren before her revival and offered “point-blank” advice.

” If you want to obligate additions in our community, you are really going to have to come into our community and sit down and talk to us ,” he told her.

Warren says she has plans to do only that.

” What I’m doing is showing up and trying to talk to parties about why I’m in this fight, about what’s broken, about how to fix it and how we’re building a grassroots movement to get it done ,” Warren told reporters after the revival.” It’s not just one program. It’s everywhere .”

Woven into her raft of police proposals are specific prescriptions to address ethnic sin. Her proposal to forgive most student loan debt and see college tuition-free attempts to reduce the ethnic wealth spread that disproportionately burdens black students. The overture would also invest $50 m in historically black colleges and universities( HBCUs ), such as Clinton.

Her cheap housing program specific aims to redress decades of discriminatory room practices and redlining in places such as the Mississippi Delta, where she went early in her campaign to highlight the initiative.

She was one of the first campaigners to endorse congressional legislation that would create a commission to study reparations for the offsprings of slaves. And at a recent forum on LGBTQ issues in Iowa last week, Warren began her remarks by say their lists of 18 black transgender women killed this year.” It is time for a president of the United Commonwealth of America to say their mentions ,” she said.

” Black tribes have a very unique experience that requires public policies that pinpoint that experience ,” said Maurice Mitchell, the national director of the Working Families party, a progressive political organization that endorsed Warren.

” The candidates who aren’t afraid to talk about hasten and class at the same time, those are the candidates that are going to compel black people to not just show up at the canvas ,” he continued,” but to get involved, to voluntary, to engage and to build a movement with them .”

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A lady listen to Democratic presidential campaigner Elizabeth Warren at an occasion in New Hampshire. Photograph: Cheryl Senter/ Associated Press

Black voters, and black women in particular, are the most loyal Democratic voting bloc. In 2016, African Americans comprised nearly a quarter, 24%, of Democratic primary voters- a share that is expected to rise in 2020.

There are signs Warren’s exertions are paying off, especially among African American women.

A Quinnipiac poll showed that her subsistence among pitch-black voters nationally clambered during the summer from 4% in July to 19% in September as Biden’s support slipped from 53 % in July to 40% in September.

At various presidential gatherings focused on voters of colour and in private meetings with activists and pitch-black chairmen this year, Warren has left her audiences amazed, said Aimee Allison, founder of She the People, political advocacy group focused on women of color that hosted an incident with 2020 nominees in Houston earlier this year.

” She is campaigning directly to women of color ,” she said.” And at the same time, she is attracting white progressives. That has the potential to be a potent coalition .”

Cliff Albright, cofounder of Black Voters Matter, said fresh scrutiny of Biden’s record and his recent observes on race- from remarks about are concerned with segregationists to a discordant reply to a debate question about reparations- are starting to chip away at his support, especially among younger color voters.

” The more that black people hear from Elizabeth Warren, the more they are intrigued by her ,” Albright said.” The opposite is happening in Joe Biden .”

But public opinion surveys and interviews with voters recommend Biden’s entreaty may be more durable than many expect.

Melissa Rouse, 46 and Tracey Easter, 44, cousins from Charlotte who sat in folding chairs under the shade of a tree as they waited for Warren to speak, said they have not yet settled on a candidate, but Warren was at the top of their list.

That wasn’t the case for many of their older relatives, who they said are firmly committed to Biden.

” My mummy is 76 and she affection, desires, ardours Joe Biden ,” Rouse said.” They feel like they are aware him .”

Both said they anticipated Biden would be the strongest candidate against Trump. Nevertheless, they came to be persuaded by Warren.

” When people have an opportunity to be in her attendance and hear her word, they ever leave affected ,” said Wendy Brawley, a South Carolina regime representative who has endorsed Warren.” Now I’m starting to hear,’ This is a person who I not only like and approval, but who can actually acquire .'”

Before leaving Rock Hill, Warren made a final stop for dinner at Gourmet Soul Kitchen. As cooks hastened to prepare an order of deep-fried prawn and muffle puppies, Warren worked the room, initiating herself to staff and diners, all of whom were black.

Deborah Cousar, a 60 -year-old retired wet-nurse deputy “whos been” rushed to the restaurant with her grandchildren upon hearing of the senator’s call, beamed as Warren told her 11 -year-old granddaughter that she was operating for president because ” that’s what girls do.

Though their encounter was brief, it left any suggestions on Cousar. While she intends to hear out the other candidates, especially as the primary hasten for South Carolina intensifies, Cousar indicated by the” vibrant dame” from Massachusetts will be hard to beat.

” She’s on fire ,” Cousar said.” If she simply preserves on doing what she’s doing, I think she’s going to persuade them pretty good .”

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Hot pups, high tea and doze defendants: LA’s royalists is fully prepared to the royal uniting

The royalists of Los Angeles, where Meghan Markle was born and elevated, are as invested in the wed as any British monarchist

There is a hot dog named in honour of the big daytime. There are still crib mentions on fascinators, Windsor Castle and how to fold napkins. There are last-minute preparations for slumber parties with bunting, scones, cucumber sandwiches and gin and tonic slush puppies.

The royalists of Los Angeles are ready for Meghan Markle’s marriage to Prince Harry on Saturday.

It will happen 5,000 miles and eight hour areas away, but these Californians feel as invested as any British monarchist.

The wedding, after all, feels in some respects like a Hollywood production.

The bride is a born and spawned Angeleno who grew up around film sets and discovered success on screen before falling for a lord, yielding a modern, biracial sequel to Grace Kelly’s move to Monaco more than half a century ago.

Hollywood perpetuates royal mystique with date dramas, Disney princess and, quite recently, Netflix’s The Crown. The luminary website TMZ, headquartered near the Pacific Ocean, extends the media pack with imperial scoops, gab and delicacies , not least the tale over whether Markle’s father, who lives 150 miles down the coast in Mexico, will amble his daughter down the aisle.

For all its English magnificence numerous here feel the opening ceremony in St George’s chapel could carry a” become in LA” sticker.

” They say she’s their princess, that it’s history in the making ,” said Dympna Madeley, manager of Ye Olde King’s Head, a British-themed gift shop in Santa Monica which has repeatedly sold out of Harry and Meghan sheets, beakers, sweaters and other merchandise.

The frenzy outruns the fuss for Prince William’s wedding to Kate Middleton in 2011, said Madeley.” There’s much more interest now. We’ve had to reorder stock five times. We didn’t realise how many parties “wouldve been” plucked into it .”

Shoppers included Redgie De Guzman, 35, a bookseller, who loaded up on union jack medals for an all-night party at a friend’s residence which will culminate when Markle says” I do” shortly before dawn local duration.” We’ll watch it live. Go large-scale or go home ,” said De Guzman.” The next wedding is likely to be, what, Prince George in 20 years ?”

Redgie
Redgie De Guzman stocks up on wedding memorabilia for a viewing party in Los Angeles. Photograph: Rory Carroll for the Guardian

The only wedding fever dissenter when the Guardian saw the storage was Paul Bailey, 50, a British expat who was stocking up on Toffee Crisps.” I don’t feel it has anything to do with “peoples lives” .”

Americans were far more excited than LA’s British grafts, said Madeley, the manager.” We think it’s because Markle is American and mixed-race. They don’t care if we tell them she’ll be a duchess , not a princess .”

Lisa Powers, who controlled a neighbouring British-themed pub, said tickets for its marry viewings sold out weeks ago.” It’s insane. A totally different buzz compared to William and Kate .”

At least three cinemas in LA will host screenings.

Pink’s Hot dog, a fast-food landmark, will give a “Royal Dog”- two hot dog and two bacon slices in a bun filled with mustard, cheese, onions, pickle relish and chili, wrapped in a packet praising Markle and Prince Harry.

Echoes of Markle’s past life in LA include frisson to the celebrations.

The Cat& Fiddle, a Hollywood pub and restaurant, offered to host a” imperial slumber party” with fascinators, pyjamas, quiz trivia, sausage buns and scones- and remembers about the bride, who seen about seven years ago with her then spouse, Trevor Engelson, said co-owner Ashley Gardner.” He had a party for one of our reciprocal friends .”

The Rose Tree Cottage, an English tea area in the outskirt of Pasadena, channelled Pygmalion when Markle saw last year reportedly for etiquette gratuities, with proprietor Edmund Fry, a British expat, in the role of Professor Higgins. Angelenos have followed in her aftermath.” We’re swamped, entirely drenched ,” an employee said on Wednesday.

Edmund
Edmund Fry leadings guests in a toast to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during afternoon tea at the Rose Tree Cottage in Pasadena, surrounded by cardboard cutouts of the royal family. Photograph: Robyn Beck/ AFP/ Getty Images

American intrigues with royalty don’t ever terminate well. Passion for Wallis Simpsoncost Edward VIII his throne and landed them in exile. Grace Kelly irked at a lost acting career and died in a car accident.

Former educators prophesied Markle will adapt to the scrutiny, distress and restrictions of monarchy.

” As a student she was very bright, very intelligent, exceedingly committed ,” said Maria Pollia, who taught Markle theology at Immaculate Heart high school in the 1990 s.

” I don’t think she has any fairytale dreams about the living standards. I consider she’ll know that it comes with some somewhat drastic alters. She is her own being but is very respectful of tradition. I don’t think she’ll be standing on tables trying to remake the royal family, that’s just not her .”

Prince Harry and Markle will focus on humanitarian campaigns, predicted Christine Knudsen, who taught Markle spirituality and literature.” We’re sure that after they get settled she and Harry will continue showing great heart and enormous conscience .”

The school, a private college near Hollywood, celebrated their alumnus earlier the coming week at “states parties ” with dancing, lemonade, biscuits and a corgi.

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