Tag Archives: UK news

Here’s the main issue behind the Jamie Oliver jerk rice row- and it’s not cultural appropriation

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People object to a minted person making money from an inauthentic bowl, while those who eat the real thing get diddly-squat

You can hear, even from a great distance, that some statements have a hot, insoluble core that won’t be easily cooled, in the same way that you can tell by watching a tavern contend whether it is about a fraternal sellout or somebody spilling something. The fracas over the personality chef Jamie Oliver’s punchy jerk rice- which led to the loss the Labour MP Dawn Butler to tweet:” Your yank rice is not OK. This appropriation from Jamaica needs to stop”- is just such a row.

Oliver devotees pushed themselves awake. Which bit of his rice is wrong, again? That he would use spice that originated in another culture; that he would get the seasoning wrong; or that he would misapply it to the wrong part, “jerk” being intended for meat , not rice? What do the liberals crave? Where was Butler when he started exploiting mostarda di frutta on pasta? Won’t someone think of the Italians?” And what about tea ?”, added the contrarians.” Is that cultural appropriation? Now we’ve appropriated it, is anyone else drinking it suitable it back down us ?” The untrained commentator, arriving from space, would assume we were a nation that furiously and irrationally adored, or detested, Oliver, whereupon discussing him at all itself becomes an act of cultural appropriation. But that’s not really what’s going on.

If you never borrow anything, that is a creed of insularity and parochialism. Because this is an easy point to score, a lot of parties are coming in to bat for Oliver who wouldn’t get near his yank rice with a 10 -ft spoon, and never tasted his jollof rice either, with which he doubly reviled an whole continent in 2014, realise it nothing like it was supposed to taste, and clumsily attributing it to Ghana when its parentages are raced. It was like going in to a Greek restaurant and telling a Turkish coffee, except multiplied by 17 and offering to make it yourself, with cloves.

But what beings are angry about isn’t the homely cross-pollination of one deliciou thing with another, but that a person who is already minted is making a load of fund out of a bastardised version of something, while the people who eat the authentic food constitute diddly-squat from it. It is just another inequality story, exploding through the social scalp like a hickey. We’ll crush it for a bit, it will hurt, some gunk will come out. The underlying modes is unchanged, until a fresh steam starts, maybe when Jeremy Paxman launches his own street-style label.

What is illuminating is that all this illustrates the detail made a decade ago in the book The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Virtually Always Do Better that difference is bad for everyone; it acquires everyone angrier, rich and good; everyone’s mental health diminishes, whatever their class. Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, the book’s scribes, “ve never been” enormous plungers on why this should be, wishing not to blur their clear epidemiological sign with speculation. But you can understand on a gut degree why it might adversely affect all of us. Oliver probably does not wake up thinking of himself as emblematic of a rigged organisation. If all debate about equality is refracted through individuals, then nobody is culpable enough to stand for the sin of advantage, and if you want to represent the underdog, you have to be so subdued yourself that you are almost dead. Personal credentials become the beginning and end of a battle that cannot be triumphed on that territory. A tranche of ruling will conclude that the debate is too laborious to bother with, or, as Peter York once archly said:” I’m just waiting for Gardeners’ Question Time to start talking about the inequality between my wisteria and my hydrangeas .”

I don’t have the answer, by the way: but I know it won’t be resolved by rice, and it would be facilitated if the super-rich tried superhumanly hard not to be jerks.

Is Michael Gove barking up the privilege tree?

Michael Gove is not the go-to politician if your main issue is puppies- shortly thereafter his stand against puppy” penalty collars”( remote-controlled collars that allow you to blast your puppy with an electric shock or, more commonly, cold air when it misbehaves ), he went back on the idea of a outlaw. Now, though, he has come out against puppy farms. He will find few people who won’t support him in this: however much you distrust him and anguish of his Singapore-in-the-channel vision for Britain, you must despise more anyone who would malnourish a puppy for money. If there is one thing besides Bake Off we could all sign up to, surely this would be it?

Gove, like Boris Johnson, has apparently turned to Facebook for intel on how to oblige himself seem leaderly, except his bird-dog whistling is not Islamophobia but real dogs. There is a peculiar quality to the animal-rights activism on Facebook. You would think it would be fluffy because animals are, but it often discontinues up in a peculiar residence, calling for the death penalty for dishonest puppy-farm owneds or age-old evidence resurgence justice, where people who leave dogs in hot gondolas are, themselves, locked in hot cars.

The great boon of pup-rights is that they can’t easily be aligned politically, so people who wouldn’t be happy with far-right connotations, or those of the left, can colonize snugly into some righteous rage that doesn’t involve break their neighbours’ windows. This is the happy place of the modern Tory moderate: all the intensity and zeal of communal rage, but none of the unfortunate and ugly ethno-nationalism.

The only problem is that anger is not politically constructive: some spleen is inevitable, but exclusively as a side-dish. For generative social perception, you may have to look somewhere other than social media.

No deal: how the euro has become the talk of British holidaymakers

” Imagine how inexpensive that would otherwise have been, before June 2016 …” This is the staple holiday conversation, repeated by every Brit in the eurozone, every seven minutes, sometimes amended by the peculiar:” Well, that would still have been expensive, even when you got EUR1. 39 to the PS1″, and culminating in the regular blowup:” One to blood one! We might as well have gone to Sweden and exhaust five quid on an apple .” Many things could change the weather, when autumn comes: the publication of the no-deal Armageddon scenarios may accompany MPs to their feels. But these undertakings in Carrefour, getting pointlessly mugged to no one’s benefit, will supply an interesting background dirge.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Fatal Cornwall attack triggers call to reform dangerous puppy laws

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Legislation is failing say activists after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a bird-dog at a caravan common in Cornwall has replaced concern over legislation that campaigners say fails to protect the public from fierce attacks.

On Sunday, police identified the dead son as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was is available in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, policemen said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a censored spawned under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on skepticism of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has since been released from detention while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening traumata after a puppy attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general hospital and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which they say fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and proscriptions four breeds of pups- the cavity officer terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs advised rectors that casualties were suffering” catastrophic traumata” with a sharp rise in reported attempts across the UK.

The environment, food and rural affairs select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the reproduce proscription have not been able to stanch the rising tide of traumata and deaths from dog onrushes. Children and adults are suffering horrific harms, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The public must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has revealed an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for hound burns between 2005 and 2017, emerge from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes home secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly placed accuse on pup reproductions rather than viewing baby owneds responsible.

” These sickening happen have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while healthy, well-behaved dogs are often put down .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of hound bite occurrences are a result of irresponsible actions of proprietors who have either not taken the time and trouble to develop their puppy accurately or have learnt them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of bird-dogs involved in attacks over the past 15 months is attributable to one of the four banned breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Fatal Cornwall attack activates call to reform dangerous dog principles

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Legislation is failing say activists after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a hound at a caravan common in Cornwall has renewed concern over legislative initiatives that campaigners say fails to protect the public from brutal attacks.

On Sunday, police identified the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was found in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, policemen said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a censored engendered under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on mistrust of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has recently been exhausted from detention while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening traumata after a bird-dog attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general hospital and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which “theyre saying” fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and bans four breeds of bird-dogs- the crater polouse terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs alarmed administrators that victims were suffering” cataclysmic traumata” with a sharp rise in reported criticizes across the UK.

The environment, meat and urban liaisons select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chairperson of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the engender injunction have not been able to stanch the rising tide of traumata and deaths from dog assaults. Children and adults are suffering horrific harms, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The populace must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has discovered an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for puppy burns between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes medium secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly situated blamed on puppy engenders rather than accommodating pet owners responsible.

” These awful occurrence have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while health, well-behaved puppies are often putting in place .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of pup bite incidents is part of irresponsible any act of owneds who have either not taken the time and trouble to improve their dog accurately or have developed them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of hounds involved in attacks over the past 15 months is attributable to one of the four banned breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack sparks call to reform hazardous puppy statutes

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Legislation is failing say campaigners after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a puppy at a caravan ballpark in Cornwall has reincarnated concern over legislative initiatives that activists say fails to protect the public from nasty attacks.

On Sunday, police reputation the dead son as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was found in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, men said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a banned engendered under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on thought of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has recently been secreted from custody while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening injuries after a pup attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general infirmary and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which they say fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and bans four produces of pups- the pit polouse terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs cautioned rectors that victims were suffering” cataclysmic hurts” with a sharp rise in reported onrushes across the UK.

The environment, food and urban affairs select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the reproduction restriction have not been able to stemmed the rising tide of traumata and deaths from dog criticizes. Children and adults are suffering horrific traumata, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The world must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has revealed an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for hound pierces between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the shadow surrounding secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly situated accuse on dog reproduces rather than harbouring baby proprietors responsible.

” These frightful occurrence have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while health, well-behaved dogs are often put down .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of bird-dog bite incidents is part of irresponsible any act of proprietors “whos had” either not taken the time and trouble to qualify their puppy accurately or have improved them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of puppies involved in attacks over the past 15 months is attributable to one of the four censored breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack activates call to reform dangerous hound constitutions

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Legislation is failing say campaigners after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a puppy at a caravan ballpark in Cornwall has replaced concern over legislative initiatives that activists say fails to protect the public from vicious attacks.

On Sunday, police mentioned the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He is located within a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, officers said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a banned breed under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on idea of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has since been exhausted from imprisonment while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening traumata after a puppy attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general infirmary and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which “theyre saying” fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and censors four raises of puppies- the quarry officer terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs counselled ministers that martyrs were suffering” disastrous harms” with a sharp rise in reported attacks across the UK.

The environment, food and rural things select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chairman of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the spawn proscription have not been able to stemmed the rising tide of hurts and deaths from dog strikes. Children and adults are suffering horrific injuries, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The populace must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has uncovered an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for bird-dog pierces between 2005 and 2017, emerge from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly targeted accuse on dog reproduces rather than deeming domesticated owneds responsible.

” These nasty happen have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while health, well-behaved hounds are often putting in place .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of hound bite incidents is the product of irresponsible actions of owners “whos had” either not taken the time and trouble to improve their hound accurately or have instructed them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of dogs involved in attacks over the past 15 months are integral to one of the four censored breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack provokes call to reform dangerous pup statutes

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Legislation is failing say campaigners after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a puppy at a caravan park in Cornwall has restored concern over legislation that campaigners say fails to protect the public from wicked attacks.

On Sunday, police mentioned the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was found in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, men said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a censored engendered under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on hunch of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has recently been secreted from custody while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening harms after a puppy attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general hospital and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which “theyre saying” fails to protect children and adults. The legislation adopted in 1991 and bans four raises of puppies- the crater pig terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs forewarned officials that casualties were suffering” cataclysmic injuries” with a sharp rise in reported criticizes across the UK.

The environment, nutrient and urban occasions select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the make restriction have not been able to stanch the rising tide of harms and deaths from dog onslaughts. Children and adults are suffering horrific harms, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The populace must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has divulged an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for puppy burns between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly targeted accuse on dog multiplies rather than harbouring baby owners responsible.

” These horrendous incident have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while healthy, well-behaved hounds are often putting in place .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of puppy bite incidents are a result of irresponsible actions of owners “whos had” either not taken the time and trouble to improve their bird-dog correctly or have civilized them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of puppies involved in attacks over the past 15 months are integral to one of the four banned breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack provokes call to reform dangerous bird-dog principles

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Legislation is failing say activists after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a bird-dog at a caravan ballpark in Cornwall has refurbished concern over legislative initiatives that campaigners say fails to protect the public from nasty attacks.

On Sunday, police referred the dead son as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He is located within a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, patrolmen said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a banned spawned under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on idea of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has since been liberated from detention while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening injuries after a puppy attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general infirmary and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which “theyre saying” fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and forbiddings four reproduces of hounds- the quarry cop terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs alerted diplomats that preys were suffering” cataclysmic injuries” with a sharp rise in reported strikes across the UK.

The environment, food and urban occasions select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chairman of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the spawn banning have not been able to stemmed the rising tide of injuries and deaths from dog onslaughts. Children and adults are suffering horrific harms, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The world must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has revealed an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for puppy gnaws between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly residence blamed on hound engenders rather than accommodating domesticated owners responsible.

” These awful happen have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while healthy, well-behaved hounds are often putting in place .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of hound bite happens is the product of irresponsible any act of proprietors who have either not taken the time and trouble to improve their bird-dog properly or have trained them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of dogs involved in attacks over the past 15 months are integral to one of the four banned breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack provokes call to reform hazardous hound rules

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Legislation is failing say activists after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a pup at a caravan ballpark in Cornwall has renewed concern over legislation that activists say fails to protect the public from inhuman attacks.

On Sunday, police appointed the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He is located within a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, detectives said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a banned engendered under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on impression of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has recently been exhausted from custody while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening hurts after a puppy attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general hospital and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which they say fails to protect children and adults. The legislation adopted in 1991 and proscriptions four produces of hounds- the crater bull terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs informed pastors that victims were suffering” disastrous hurts” with a sharp rise in reported attacks across the UK.

The environment, nutrient and rural affairs select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the make prohibition have not stemmed the rising tide of harms and deaths from dog onslaughts. Children and adults are suffering horrific injuries, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The populace must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has divulged an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for hound bites between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the shadow environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly residence blamed on dog engenders rather than hampering baby owners responsible.

” These sickening incident have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while health, well-behaved hounds are often putting in place .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of bird-dog bite incidents are a result of irresponsible any act of proprietors who have either not taken the time and trouble to develop their puppy properly or have trained them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of dogs involved in attacks over the past 15 months belonged to one of the four censored breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack provokes call to reform hazardous puppy laws

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Legislation is failing say campaigners after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a puppy at a caravan park in Cornwall has refreshed concern over legislation that campaigners say fails to protect the public from ferocious attacks.

On Sunday, police reputation the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was found in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, policemen said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a banned engendered under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on mistrust of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has recently been liberated from custody while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening harms after a pup attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general hospital and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which “theyre saying” fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and prohibitions four reproductions of hounds- the quarry polouse terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs alerted pastors that victims were suffering” catastrophic harms” with a sharp rise in reported attempts across the UK.

The environment, food and rural occasions select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the make proscribe have not stemmed the rising tide of harms and deaths from dog onrushes. Children and adults are suffering horrific injuries, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The public must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has exposed an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for hound bites between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly placed blame on puppy raises rather than maintaining domesticated owneds responsible.

” These horrific incident have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while healthy, well-behaved dogs are often put down .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of puppy bite incidents are a result of irresponsible actions of owners “whos had” either not taken the time and trouble to study their puppy correctly or have learnt them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of pups involved in attacks over the past 15 months are integral to one of the four banned breeds.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Fatal Cornwall attack activates call to reform dangerous puppy principles

/ by / Tags:

Legislation is failing say campaigners after death of Frankie Macritchie, 9, in Looe

The death of a nine-year old boy killed by a bird-dog at a caravan ballpark in Cornwall has regenerated concern over legislation that activists say fails to protect the public from hateful attacks.

On Sunday, police referred the dead boy as Frankie Macritchie from Plymouth. He was found in a caravan at Tencreek holiday park in Looe after he was attacked on Saturday by a “bulldog-type breed”, police said.

He was alone with the animal in the caravan while his family were in an adjacent unit, patrolmen said.

The dog, which is not believed to be a censored spawned under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act, has since been transferred to kennels in Cornwall.

A 28 -year-old woman was arrested on mistrust of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control but has since been liberated from custody while police continue investigations.

Last Thursday, a six-week-old baby suffered life-threatening hurts after a bird-dog attack.

The boy from Hawick in the Scottish Borders was taken to Borders general infirmary and was later transferred by air ambulance to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow.

He remains in critical condition, and his aunt has taken the dog to the vet to be put down.

MPs have raised serious concerns over the Dangerous Dogs Act, which they say fails to protect children and adults. The legislation was introduced in 1991 and forbiddings four spawns of dogs- the crater pig terrier, Japanese tosa, dogo Argentino and fila Brasileiro.

In October last year, MPs alerted rectors that victims were suffering” disastrous traumata” with a sharp rise in reported attempts across the UK.

The environment, nutrient and urban things select committee called for a full-scale review into dog laws amid concerns the legislation failed to protect the public, and said breed-specific legislation was misguided.

Tory MP Neil Parish, the chair of the committee, said:” Existing laws and the make disallow have not stanch the rising tide of injuries and deaths from dog attempts. Children and adults are suffering horrific injuries, many of them avoidable. This is unacceptable.

” The world must be properly protected, and we are therefore calling for a full-scale review of existing dog control strategies .”

Data from the NHS has disclosed an 81% increase in the number of people taken to hospital for puppy bites between 2005 and 2017, rising from 4,110 to 7,461.

After the Cornwall attack the darknes environment secretary, Sue Hayman, said the act unfairly situated accuse on hound reproductions rather than impounding baby proprietors responsible.

” These sickening occurrence have to be a wake-up call to the government ,” she said.” The Dangerous Dogs Act, with its narrow focus on breed, is not stopping attacks- while health, well-behaved bird-dogs are often put down .”

The Kennel Club said:” The majority of bird-dog bite incidents is the product of irresponsible any act of owneds who have either not taken the time and trouble to train their pup correctly or have qualified them to behave aggressively .”

A freedom of information request by the Sunday Times found that less than a third of bird-dogs involved in attacks over the past 15 months are integral to one of the four censored breeds.

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