Tag Archives: Science fiction

Hugo gifts receive off rightwing demonstrates to celebrate diverse authors

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Another attempt by the Sad and Rabid Puppies radicals to hijack the science fiction award goes to the dogs, as authors and claims not in their campaign take top prizes

The wins of the 2016 Hugo awards have been announced, with this years selections signalling a resounding defeat for the so-called Puppies campaigns to derail the revered annual honouring of science fiction literature and drama.

The winners were announced on Saturday evening at MidAmeriCon II, the World Science Fiction Convention comprised this year in Kansas City.

As in previous years, there had been attempts by two separate radicals, the Sad Puppies and the Rabid Puppies, to activity the honors in favour of their well-liked slates of tasks. Both groups claimed that science fiction had now become dominated by a liberal, left-wing bias.

The Hugos are voted on by those who purchase an attending or substantiating membership to either the present or previous Worldcon events. Eligible voters can tick the No Award box if they dont shared with any of the shortlisted pieces, a tool which has been used to block out Puppies recommendations previously. In 2015, five No Awards please give, including for the prestigious best novella and best short story categories; an extraordinary amount, as No Award had only been presented as many times in the entire history of the award, which began in 1953.

In contrast, this year there were only two No Awards, in the smallest best related effort and best fan-cast categories.

Best novel went to NK Jemisins The Fifth Season, a richly-detailed storey of a planet experiencing a periodic and catastrophic season of apocalyptic climate change. Jemisin has already been clashed with Rabid Puppies co-ordinator Theodore Beale, who was expelled from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America after he publicly called the black generator an developed but naive savage.

The highly-acclaimed Binti by Nnedi Okorafor scooped best novella. The fib of officers of the first member of the Himba community on Earth to be accepted into a prestigious intergalactic university, Binti too won the Nebula gift for the same category earlier this year.

And best novelette was increased to Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfanq, a Chinese science fiction narration which, carried by Ken Liu, appeared in Uncanny Magazine.

The best short story, best editor long form, best writer short model, and best professional master awards all went to women nominees respectively Naomi Kritzer for her portion Cat Pictures Please, Ellen Datlow, Sheila E Gilbert and Abigail Larson.

In other categories, Neil Gaimans return to the character that established his identify earned him the best graphic narration apportion, along with artist JH Williams III, for Sandman: Prelude, while Oscar-nominated film The Martian and Marvel TV show Jessica Jones prevailed for the most wonderful spectacular presentations.

While simply two No Awards please give this year, the Hugo award organisers now face the decision of whether to change how the nomination method currently labor. With people able to buy subsidizing bodies to Worldcons even if they have no purpose of attending to ensure they have a say in what ultimately goes on the ballot, the Hugos remain democratic, if vulnerable to internet campaigns.

The 2016 Hugo award winners

Best novel: The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin( Orbit)

Best novella: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor( Tor.com)

Best novelette: Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, carried Ken Liu( Uncanny Magazine, Jan-Feb 2015)

Best short story: Cat Pictures Please by Naomi Kritzer( Clarkesworld, January 2015)

Best related labour: No Award

Best graphic narrative: The Sandman: Prelude to be prepared by Neil Gaiman, artistry by J.H. Williams III( Vertigo)

Best drastic lecture( long form ): The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, to be determined by Ridley Scott( Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20 th Century Fox)

Best drastic appearance( short form ): Jessica Jones: AKA Smile written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer( Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)

Best editor – short way: Ellen Datlow

Best editor – long form: Sheila E. Gilbert

Best professional master: Abigail Larson

Best semiprozine: Uncanny Magazine revised by Lynne M. Thomas& Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign& Steven Schapansky

Best fanzine: File 770 edited by Mike Glyer

Best fancast: No Award

Best fan writer: Mike Glyer

Best fan artist: Steve Stiles

The John W. Campbell Award for the most wonderful brand-new professional science fiction or fantasy writer of 2014 or 2015, sponsored by Dell Magazines( not a Hugo Award ): Andy Weir

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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‘ So different types of strange ‘: how Nnedi Okorafor is changing the face of sci-fi

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With a Marvel comic under her loop and a fiction being adapted for TV by HBO, the Nigerian-American columnist is flying the flag for black, female geeks

As the science fiction novelist Nnedi Okorafor takes to the stage at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, she challenges stereotypes before she has said a word. The 43 -year-old writer who won the 2016 Hugo award( the Oscars of the sci-fi nature) for best novella doesn’t look like much of a geek. Yes, she wears oversized glasses, but Okorafor’s specs are classy, royal-blue Cat-Eyes , not sinewy aviators. And, crucially, she happens to be a black woman.

The Nigerian-American’s success has been applauded as a win by their home communities that have all along applauded her on from the margins. So when she tweeted on 11 August that she was working on her first assignment with the comic publisher Marvel, devotees were stimulated. (” A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian female. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive ,” wrote one fan on Twitter) And with a tale, Who Fears Death, to be adapted for TV by HBO( George RR Martin is its manager make) Okorafor is about to go from the lonely geek reference-point for young African ladies to everybody’s favourite brand-new sci-fi writer.

Nnedi
Nnedi Okorafor … don’t announce her a geek. Photograph: Beth Gwinn/ Must Credit: Beth Gwinn/ Writer Pictures

Okorafor is not the only black girl overpowering a itinerary in the sometimes hostile and isolating world-wide of science fiction. NK Jemisin, who won the Hugo award for best novel two years in a row, was called an” educated but ignorant brute” by the US far-right activist Theodore Beale, who has long railed against the increasingly diverse sci-fi parish. Octavia E Butler, probably the best known black female sci-fi writer, has said that she found herself alienated from the characters in the books she read. Okorafor admits to not having spoken much sci-fi grown up, but, like Butler, struggled to identify with supporters when she did.” It just seemed like a very infertile, white-hot male world ,” she says.” I would migrate towards personas who were alien, or swine .”

Today, though, marginalised pitch-black girls and young women with a love for manga, gaming, or robotics, can find each other online. Facebook communities include Black Girl Nerds– which has 126,000 adherents- and its outgrowth, Black Girl Geeks, which has more than 38,000 adherents on Twitter. Black female geeks are also being celebrated on screen: the movie Hidden People– about the African American mathematicians who played a vital role in the opening hasten- was one of the biggest movies at the box office in 2016.

Venomverse
Venomverse( A Blessing in Disguise) by Marvel. Photograph: Tana Ford/ Marvel

Asked how she feels about being called a geek, Okorafor gets animated, but then, as she did on the TED stage, she eludes apprehensions:” For a very long time, I refused to call myself a geek or a nerd because I was also an athlete ,” she says.” I was always the first kid picked for crews .” She remembers gladly for several minutes about playing dodgeball and semi-pro tennis, and jokes about her prodigious upper-body persuasivenes:” My mum used to shed the javelin. I’ve got her arms. I can do one-handed pull-ups ,” she says with a indicate of pride.

Raised in the southern suburbs of Chicago, where she and her sisters would be called calls and chased by skinheads, Okorafor grew up feeling like an intruder. She has, nonetheless, turned that perspective to her advantage, seeing personas and prepares who crisply differ from their mainstream show; Who Fears Death, for example, is set in a post-apocalyptic Sudan and mixtures fantasy with magical realism.

Although she may have been too sporting in her boy to fit the geek mould, Okorafor now discovers solace in the variety within the geek parish. At San Diego Comic-Con this year with her daughter, she marvelled at the display of parties in cosplay dress.” We were like:’ This is awesome. Everyone is just being exactly what we .’ I like the diversification- there are so many different types of strange .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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‘ So many different types of strange ‘: how Nnedi Okorafor is changing the face of sci-fi

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

With a Marvel comic under her belt and a fiction being adapted for Tv by HBO, the Nigerian-American writer is flying the flag for black, female geeks

As the science fiction novelist Nnedi Okorafor takes to the stage at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, she challenges stereotypes before she has said a word. The 43 -year-old writer who won the 2016 Hugo award( the Oscars of the sci-fi world) for best novella doesn’t look like much of a geek. Yes, she wears oversized glass, but Okorafor’s specs are trendy, royal-blue Cat-Eyes , not skinny aviators. And, crucially, she happens to be a pitch-black woman.

The Nigerian-American’s success has been applauded as a succes by their home communities that has long applauded her on from the margins. So when she tweeted on 11 August that she was working on her first projection with the comic publisher Marvel, fans were thrilled. (” A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian lady. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive ,” wrote one devotee on Twitter) And with a fiction, Who Fears Death, to be adapted for Tv by HBO( George RR Martin is its manager farmer) Okorafor is about to go from the solitary geek reference-point for young African ladies to everybody’s favourite new sci-fi writer.

Nnedi
Nnedi Okorafor … don’t announce her a geek. Picture: Beth Gwinn/ Must Credit: Beth Gwinn/ Writer Pictures

Okorafor is not the only pitch-black dame overpowering a route in the sometimes unfriendly and isolating macrocosm of science fiction. NK Jemisin, who won the Hugo award for best novel two years in a row, was called an” educated but naive brute” by the US far-right activist Theodore Beale, who has long railed against the increasingly diverse sci-fi parish. Octavia E Butler, possibly the most wonderful known black female sci-fi writer, has said that she found herself alienated from the specific characteristics in the books she spoke. Okorafor acknowledges to not having read much sci-fi growing up, but, like Butler, struggled to identify with exponents when she did.” It just seemed like a very infertile, grey male world-wide ,” she says.” I would move towards reputations who were alien, or swine .”

Today, though, marginalised pitch-black girls and young women with a affection for manga, gaming, or robotics, can find each other online. Facebook communities include Black Girl Nerds– which has 126,000 followers- and its offshoot, Black Girl Geeks, which has more than 38,000 followers on Twitter. Black female geeks are also being celebrated on screen: the movie Hidden Representations– about the African American mathematicians who played a crucial role in the seat race- was one of the biggest cinemas at the box office in 2016.

Venomverse
Venomverse( A Blessing in Disguise) by Marvel. Photo: Tana Ford/ Marvel

Asked how she feels about being called a geek, Okorafor gets animated, but then, as she did on the TED stage, she eludes beliefs:” For a long time, I refused to call myself a geek or a nerd because I was also an athlete ,” she says.” I was always the first kid picked for squads .” She reminisces merrily for several minutes about playing dodgeball and semi-pro tennis, and jokes about her phenomenal upper-body forte:” My mum been applied to throw the javelin. I’ve got her limbs. I can do one-handed pull-ups ,” she says with a hint of pride.

Raised in the southern suburbiums of Chicago, where she and her sisters would be called figures and chased by skinheads, Okorafor grew up feeling like an outsider. She has, nonetheless, turned that view to her advantage, envisaging attributes and arranges who sharply differentiate from their mainstream show; Who Fears Death, for example, is set in a post-apocalyptic Sudan and mixes fantasy with magical realism.

Although she may have been too athletic in her boy to fit the geek mould, Okorafor now spots comfort in the variety within the geek community. At San Diego Comic-Con this year with her daughter, she marvelled at the array of people in cosplay dress.” We were like:’ This is awesome. Everyone is just being what they are .’ I like the diversity- there are so many different types of strange .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Hugo apportions consider off rightwing protests to celebrate diverse columnists

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

Another attempt by the Sad and Rabid Puppies radicals to hijack the science fiction award goes to the dogs, as writers and designations not in their safarus take top prizes

The winners of the 2016 Hugo awards have been announced, with this years options signalling a reverberating demolish for the so-called Puppies campaigns to thwart the revered annual honouring of science fiction literature and drama.

The wins were announced on Saturday evening at MidAmeriCon II, the World Science Fiction Convention deemed this year in Kansas City.

As in previous years, there had been attempts by two separate groups, the Sad Puppy and the Rabid Puppies, to tournament the awards in favour of their preferred slates of acts. Both groups claimed that science fiction has already become dominated by a radical, left-wing bias.

The Hugos are voted on by those who purchase an attending or subscribing membership to either the present or previous Worldcon occasions. Eligible voters can click the No Award box if they dont agree with any of the shortlisted acts, a implement which has been used to block out Puppies recommendations previously. In 2015, five No Awards were given, including for the prestigious best novella and better short story categories; an extraordinary numeral, as No Award had only been presented as many times in the entire record of the loot, which began in 1953.

In contrast, this year there were only two No Accolades, in the smaller best related employment and best fan-cast categories.

Best novel went to NK Jemisins The Fifth Season, a richly-detailed fib of a planet experiencing a regular and catastrophic season of apocalyptic climate change. Jemisin has already been clashed with Rabid Puppies co-ordinator Theodore Beale, who was removed from the Science fiction and Fantasy Writers of America after he publicly called the pitch-black scribe an trained but naive savage.

The highly-acclaimed Binti by Nnedi Okorafor scooped good novella. The fable of officers of the first member of the Himba community on Earth to be accepted into a prestigious intergalactic university, Binti likewise won the Nebula awarding for the same category earlier this year.

And better novelette was given to Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfanq, a Chinese science fiction fib which, carried by Ken Liu, appeared in Uncanny Magazine.

The best short story, better editor long form, good writer short form, and good professional master awards all went to women nominees respectively Naomi Kritzer for her fragment Cat Pictures Please, Ellen Datlow, Sheila E Gilbert and Abigail Larson.

In other categories, Neil Gaimans return to the character that became his call deserved him the best graphic floor awarding, together with artist JH Williams III, for Sandman: Overture, while Oscar-nominated movie The Martian and Marvel TV show Jessica Jones acquired for the best stunning presentations.

While simply two No Awards please give this year, the Hugo award organisers now face the decision of whether to change how the nomination system currently drives. With people able to buy subscribing bodies to Worldcons even if they have no aim of attending to ensure they have a say in what ultimately get on the ballot, the Hugos remain democratic, if vulnerable to internet campaigns.

The 2016 Hugo award winners

Best novel: The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin( Orbit)

Best novella: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor( Tor.com)

Best novelette: Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, translated Ken Liu( Uncanny Magazine, Jan-Feb 2015)

Best short story: Cat Pictures Please by Naomi Kritzer( Clarkesworld, January 2015)

Best related toil: No Award

Best graphic fib: The Sandman: Prelude written by Neil Gaiman, artwork by J.H. Williams III( Vertigo)

Best spectacular introduction( long form ): The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, directed by Ridley Scott( Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20 th Century Fox)

Best dramatic performance( short flesh ): Jessica Jones: AKA Smile written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer( Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)

Best editor – short figure: Ellen Datlow

Best editor – long form: Sheila E. Gilbert

Best professional artist: Abigail Larson

Best semiprozine: Uncanny Magazine edited by Lynne M. Thomas& Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign& Steven Schapansky

Best fanzine: File 770 edited by Mike Glyer

Best fancast: No Award

Best fan writer: Mike Glyer

Best fan artist: Steve Stiles

The John W. Campbell Award for best available new professional science fiction or fantasy columnist of 2014 or 2015, sponsored by Dell Magazines( not a Hugo Award ): Andy Weir

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Hugo gives meet off rightwing declarations to celebrate diverse columnists

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

Another attempt by the Sad and Rabid Puppies radicals to hijack the science fiction award goes to the dogs, as columnists and designations not in their campaign take top prizes

The wins of the 2016 Hugo awards have been announced, with this years selections signalling a resounding win for the so-called Puppies campaigns to thwart the revered annual honouring of science fiction literature and drama.

The wins were announced on Saturday evening at MidAmeriCon II, the World Science Fiction Convention braced this year in Kansas City.

As in previous years, there had been attempts by two sift radicals, the Sad Puppies and the Rabid Puppies, to activity the bestows in favour of their preferred slates of wields. Both groups claimed that science fiction has become dominated by a liberal, left-wing bias.

The Hugos are voted on by those who purchase an attending or corroborating membership to either the present or previous Worldcon happens. Eligible voters can tick the No Award box if they dont agreed to accept any of the shortlisted employments, a tool which has been used to block out Puppies recommendations previously. In 2015, five No Awards were given, including for the prestigious best novella and best short story categories; an extraordinary digit, as No Award had only been presented as many times in the entire biography of the medal, which started on 1953.

In contrast, this year there were only two No Gifts, in the small best related toil and better fan-cast categories.

Best novel went to NK Jemisins The Fifth Season, a richly-detailed story of a planet experiencing a periodic and cataclysmic season of apocalyptic climate change. Jemisin has already been clashed with Rabid Puppies co-ordinator Theodore Beale, who was removed from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America after he publicly called the black writer an educated but ignorant savage.

The highly-acclaimed Binti by Nnedi Okorafor scooped excellent novella. The anecdote of a member of the first member of the Himba community on Earth to be accepted into a prestigious intergalactic university, Binti likewise won the Nebula bestow for the same category earlier this year.

And excellent novelette was given to Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfanq, a Chinese science fiction narration which, translated by Ken Liu, appeared in Uncanny Magazine.

The excellent short story, excellent writer long form, good writer short species, and best professional creator awards all went to women campaigners respectively Naomi Kritzer for her portion Cat Pictures Please, Ellen Datlow, Sheila E Gilbert and Abigail Larson.

In other categories, Neil Gaimans return to the character that constructed his appoint payed him the best graphic fib bestow, along with creator JH Williams III, for Sandman: Overture, while Oscar-nominated movie The Martian and Marvel TV show Jessica Jones won for the best spectacular presentations.

While only two No Awards were given this year, the Hugo award organisers now face the decision of whether to change how the nomination structure currently wreaks. With people able to buy substantiating bodies to Worldcons even if they have no purpose of attending to ensure they have a say in what eventually gets on the ballot, the Hugos persist democratic, if vulnerable to internet campaigns.

The 2016 Hugo award winners

Best novel: The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin( Orbit)

Best novella: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor( Tor.com)

Best novelette: Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, carried Ken Liu( Uncanny Magazine, Jan-Feb 2015)

Best short story: Cat Pictures Please by Naomi Kritzer( Clarkesworld, January 2015)

Best related occupation: No Award

Best graphic narration: The Sandman: Prelude written by Neil Gaiman, prowes by J.H. Williams III( Vertigo)

Best spectacular representation( long form ): The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, directed by Ridley Scott( Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20 th Century Fox)

Best dramatic representation( short model ): Jessica Jones: AKA Smile written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer( Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)

Best editor – short pattern: Ellen Datlow

Best editor – long form: Sheila E. Gilbert

Best professional master: Abigail Larson

Best semiprozine: Uncanny Magazine revised by Lynne M. Thomas& Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign& Steven Schapansky

Best fanzine: Register 770 revised by Mike Glyer

Best fancast: No Award

Best fan writer: Mike Glyer

Best fan artist: Steve Stiles

The John W. Campbell Award for the best brand-new professional science fiction or fantasy scribe of 2014 or 2015, sponsored by Dell Magazines( not a Hugo Award ): Andy Weir

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

The good SF and fantasy journals of 2016

In a year in which new and important express from all over the world drew themselves listen, Adam Roberts reflects on SFs ever-expanding universe

In 2016, SF and fantasy led global. It wasnt a question of success both genres have been globally successful for many years but of provenance. This was its first year in which western audiences began to wake up to the excellence and diversity of genre expressions from around the world.

Take, for example, the Hugo, the categories most prestigious award. Over the last couple of years this pillage was more or less hijacked by the Sad and Rabid Puppies radicals opposed to the most progressive and liberal iterations of SF. In 2016 these indignant activists attested much less destructive. This times Hugo wins were not only enormous volumes, the latter are pointers for the direction in which the genre as a whole is moving. Best novel went to NK Jemisins The Fifth Season( Orbit ), a fib of an earthquake-afflicted and squandered world-wide that parts as a potent fable of ecological breakdown while at the same time reconfiguring fantasy in more ethnically and sexually diverse counselings. Better novella was Nnedi Okorafors African-flavoured space opera Binti( Tor ), while better novelette was Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, restated by Ken Liu.

Hao is the first Chinese woman to triumph a Hugo, and while SF has been a big deal in China for some years, in 2016 it began properly to filter into western consciousness. Deaths End( Head of Zeus ), the final magnitude of Liu Cixins Remembrance of Earths Past trilogy, was released in English( the first magnitude, The Three-Body Problem, won last years better novel Hugo ), again translated by Ken Liu. Liu Cixins trilogy is SF in the grand style, a galaxy-spanning, ideas-rich narration of invasion and crusade between humanity and the foreigner Trisolarians. There is an energy, a rawness, to a lot of Chinese SF, a sense of excitement in the possibilities of the genre itself. The more China becomes a high-tech global ability, the more we will see its writers and creators turn to SF as the literature best fitted to exploring technological and social change.

Of course, the central barricade to a properly world SF remains the anglophone biases of culture and fandom, which afford an advantage to novelists who work in English. Lavie Tidhars Central Station( Tachyon ), a sprawling carol to the beauty and mess of cultural diversity set in a future spaceport Tel Aviv, is one example: Israeli-born Tidhar lives in London and writes in English. Malaysian-born writer Zen Cho too lives in London and writes in English: her elegantly described Regency fantasy Sorcerer to the Crown( Pan) acquired this years British Fantasy award. But translation is on the rise, very, often attracting on crowdsourced or kickstarted funds to raise novelists to new audiences. Meanwhile, in Iraq+ 100: Legends from a Century After the Invasion, Comma press commissioned 10 homegrown writers to suspect what their own countries might look like in its first year 2103, with fascinating results.

Galaxy-spanning Galaxy-spanning Deaths End, the final publication of Liu Cixins Remembrance of Earths Past trilogy, draws alien intrusion. Photo: Alamy

Another reason why 2016 felt fresh is because it looked the emergence of important new voices. South African writer Nick Woods potent debut Azanian Bridges( NewCon) applies althistory to get for the purposes of the scalp of apartheid. Ada Palmers firstly novel, Too Like the Lightning( Tor ), is written with real panache, mincing together 18 th-century manners and 25 th-century interplanetary undertaking. Becky Assembly followed up the huge success of her self-published first tale with an evenly good second, the clever and touching A Shut and Common Orbit( Hodder& Stoughton ). And Yoon Ha Lees Ninefox Gambit( Solaris) recasts Korean legend in a densely interpreted high-tech future universe to be organized by dockets, in effect computer programs that specifies the specific characteristics of reality.

While Yoon Ha Lees worldbuilding is intricate, some of the years excellent works took quite simple ideas and developed them in direct and powerful ways. Christopher Priests The Gradual( Gollancz ), set in a immense archipelago, develops a straightforward-enough science-fictional form of experience region differences into an exceptional musing on expedition, ageing and loss, while Nina Allans beautifully written The Race( Titan) makes four characters and two different versions of Britain into a heart-wrenching story about the difficulties of human connection.

In an abnormally varied time for SF and fantasy, this may be a very close we have to a unifying topic: translation as a way of talking about the obstacles preventing, and possibilities of, truer communication. Its no coincidence that the alien-encounter movie Arrival turned out to be one of the best movies of its first year. It was based on a short story by Ted Chiang, a scribe long worshipped in the genre, though little known outside it. Chiangs story takes as its hero a linguistics expert and translator. Her strivings to connect are a metaphor for something far bigger in SF and imagination, and in the wider world.

Adam Roberts The Thing Itself issued by Gollancz. Save at least 30% on this years commentators selections when you buy at the Guardian Bookshop. Visit bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. Support the Guardian and its journalism with every volume you buy this Christmas.* Free UK p& p for online orderings over 10. Minimum 1.99 p& p were applied to telephone orders.

Best book registers of 2016

Best myth Best crime and thrillers Best science fiction and fantasy

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‘ So many different types of strange ‘: how Nnedi Okorafor is changing the look of sci-fi

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

With a Marvel comic under her loop and a novel being adapted for Tv by HBO, the Nigerian-American scribe is flying the flag for black, female geeks

As the science fiction novelist Nnedi Okorafor takes to the stage at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, she defies stereotypes before she has said a word. The 43 -year-old writer who won the 2016 Hugo award( the Oscars of the sci-fi macrocosm) for excellent novella doesn’t look like much of a geek. Yes, she wears oversized glasses, but Okorafor’s specs are trendy, royal-blue Cat-Eyes , not sinewy aviators. And, crucially, she happens to be a black woman.

The Nigerian-American’s success has been applauded as a succes by their home communities that has long encouraged her on from the margins. So when she tweeted on 11 August that she was working on her firstly programme with the comic publisher Marvel, love were stimulated. (” A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian wife. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive ,” wrote one fan on Twitter) And with a romance, Who Fears Death, to be adapted for TV by HBO( George RR Martin is its manager creator) Okorafor is about to go from the solitary geek reference-point for young African women to everybody’s favourite new sci-fi writer.

Nnedi
Nnedi Okorafor … don’t announce her a geek. Picture: Beth Gwinn/ Must Credit: Beth Gwinn/ Writer Pictures

Okorafor is not the only black girl beating a direction in the sometimes hostile and isolating nature of science fiction. NK Jemisin, who won the Hugo award for excellent novel two years in a row, was called an” educated but naive beast” by the US far-right activist Theodore Beale, who has long railed against the increasingly diverse sci-fi community. Octavia E Butler, perhaps best available known black girl sci-fi writer, has said that she found herself alienated from the characters in the books she read. Okorafor admits to not having spoken much sci-fi growing up, but, like Butler, struggled to identify with supporters when she did.” It just seemed like a very sterile, white-hot male macrocosm ,” she says.” I would migrate towards reputations “whos” alien, or animals .”

Today, though, marginalised pitch-black girls and young women with a cherish for manga, gaming, or robotics, can find each other online. Facebook communities include Black Girl Nerds– which has 126,000 partisans- and its outgrowth, Black Girl Geeks, which has more than 38,000 adherents on Twitter. Black female geeks are also being celebrated on screen: the movie Hidden Chassis– about the African American mathematicians who played a vital role in the opening race- was one of the biggest movies at the box office in 2016.

Venomverse
Venomverse( A Blessing in Disguise) by Marvel. Photo: Tana Ford/ Marvel

Asked how she feels about being called a geek, Okorafor gets animated, but then, as she did on the TED stage, she flouts apprehensions:” For a very long time, I refused to call myself a geek or a nerd because I was also an athlete ,” she pronounces.” I was always the first teenager picked for squads .” She remembers gladly for several minutes about playing dodgeball and semi-pro tennis, and parodies about her phenomenal upper-body persuasivenes:” My mum used to shed the javelin. I’ve got her arms. I can do one-handed pull-ups ,” she mentions with a suggestion of pride.

Raised in the southern suburbiums of Chicago, where she and her sisters would be called figures and chased by skinheads, Okorafor grew up appearing like an interloper. She has, nonetheless, passed that view to her advantage, seeing references and locates who sharply contrast from their mainstream picture; Who Fears Death, for example, is set in a post-apocalyptic Sudan and mixes fantasy with mystical realism.

Although she may have been too sporting in her youth to fit the geek mould, Okorafor now meets convenience in the variety within the geek parish. At San Diego Comic-Con this year with her daughter, she marvelled at the display of parties in cosplay garbs.” We were like:’ This is awesome. Everyone is just being exactly what we .’ I like the diversity- there are so many different types of strange .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Hugo apportions meet off rightwing demonstrations to celebrate diverse authors

Another attempt by the Sad and Rabid Puppies radicals to hijack the science fiction award goes to the dogs, as columnists and deeds not in their safarus take top prizes

The winners of the 2016 Hugo awards have been announced, with this years selections signalling a reverberating win for the so-called Puppies campaigns to derail the venerable annual honouring of science fiction literature and drama.

The winners were announced on Saturday evening at MidAmeriCon II, the World Science Fiction Convention deemed this year in Kansas City.

As in previous years, there had been attempts by two separate groups, the Sad Puppies and the Rabid Puppies, to game the gives in favour of their preferred slates of employments. Both radicals claimed that science fiction has already become dominated by a radical, left-wing bias.

The Hugos are voted on by those who purchase an attending or supporting membership to either the current or previous Worldcon contests. Eligible voters can click the No Award box if they dont agree with any of the shortlisted handiworks, a implement which has been used to block out Puppies recommendations previously. In 2015, five No Awards were given, including for the prestigious best novella and good short story categories; an unprecedented count, as No Award had only been presented as many times in the entire record of the loot, which began in 1953.

In contrast, this year there were only two No Apportions, in the smallest best related toil and good fan-cast categories.

Best novel went to NK Jemisins The Fifth Season, a richly-detailed storey of a planet experiencing a regular and catastrophic season of apocalyptic climate change issues. Jemisin have already been clashed with Rabid Puppies co-ordinator Theodore Beale, who was removed from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America after he publicly called the pitch-black generator an improved but naive savage.

The highly-acclaimed Binti by Nnedi Okorafor scooped excellent novella. The narration of a member of the first member of the Himba community on Earth to be accepted into a prestigious intergalactic university, Binti too won the Nebula bestow for the same category earlier this year.

And better novelette was transferred to Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfanq, a Chinese science fiction narration which, restated by Ken Liu, appeared in Uncanny Magazine.

The better short story, best editor long form, good writer short flesh, and best professional master awards all went to women nominees respectively Naomi Kritzer for her patch Cat Pictures Please, Ellen Datlow, Sheila E Gilbert and Abigail Larson.

In other categories, Neil Gaimans return to the character that realise his appoint deserved him the best graphic legend give, along with master JH Williams III, for Sandman: Overture, while Oscar-nominated cinema The Martian and Marvel TV show Jessica Jones triumphed for the best stunning presentations.

While simply two No Awards “ve been given” this year, the Hugo award organisers now face the decision of whether to change how the nomination organisation currently toils. With beings able to buy subsidizing memberships to Worldcons even if they have no intention of attending to ensure they have a say in what ultimately goes on the ballot, the Hugos continue democratic, if vulnerable to internet campaigns.

The 2016 Hugo award winners

Best novel: The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin( Orbit)

Best novella: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor( Tor.com)

Best novelette: Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, carried Ken Liu( Uncanny Magazine, Jan-Feb 2015)

Best short story: Cat Pictures Please by Naomi Kritzer( Clarkesworld, January 2015)

Best related effort: No Award

Best graphic story: The Sandman: Overture writes to Neil Gaiman, artwork by J.H. Williams III( Vertigo)

Best dramatic demonstration( long form ): The Martian screenplay by Drew Goddard, directed by Ridley Scott( Scott Free Productions; Kinberg Genre; TSG Entertainment; 20 th Century Fox)

Best drastic presentation( short model ): Jessica Jones: AKA Smile written by Scott Reynolds, Melissa Rosenberg, and Jamie King, directed by Michael Rymer( Marvel Television; ABC Studios; Tall Girls Productions; Netflix)

Best editor – short structure: Ellen Datlow

Best editor – long form: Sheila E. Gilbert

Best professional artist: Abigail Larson

Best semiprozine: Uncanny Magazine edited by Lynne M. Thomas& Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, and Erika Ensign& Steven Schapansky

Best fanzine: File 770 revised by Mike Glyer

Best fancast: No Award

Best fan writer: Mike Glyer

Best fan artist: Steve Stiles

The John W. Campbell Award for the best new professional science fiction or fantasy writer of 2014 or 2015, sponsored by Dell Magazines( not a Hugo Award ): Andy Weir

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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‘ So different types of strange ‘: how Nnedi Okorafor is changing the face of sci-fi

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With a Marvel comic under her loop and a romance being adapted for TV by HBO, the Nigerian-American novelist is flying the flag for pitch-black, female geeks

As the science fiction novelist Nnedi Okorafor takes to the stage at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, she challenges stereotypes before she has said a word. The 43 -year-old writer who won the 2016 Hugo award( the Oscars of the sci-fi nature) for better novella doesn’t look like often of a geek. Yes, she wears oversized glass, but Okorafor’s specs are swank, royal-blue Cat-Eyes , not skinny aviators. And, crucially, she happens to be a pitch-black woman.

The Nigerian-American’s success has been applauded as a win by a community that have all along encouraged her on from the margins. So when she tweeted on 11 August that she was working on her first campaign with the comic publisher Marvel, devotees were stimulated. (” A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian female. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive ,” wrote one love on Twitter) And with a fiction, Who Fears Death, to be adapted for TV by HBO( George RR Martin is its executive producer) Okorafor is about to go from the solitary geek reference-point for young African women to everybody’s favourite brand-new sci-fi writer.

Nnedi
Nnedi Okorafor … don’t announce her a geek. Picture: Beth Gwinn/ Must Credit: Beth Gwinn/ Writer Pictures

Okorafor is not the only black lady beating a track in the sometimes unfriendly and isolating macrocosm of science fiction. NK Jemisin, who won the Hugo award for better novel two years in a row, was called an” educated but naive heathen” by the US far-right activist Theodore Beale, who has long railed against the increasingly diverse sci-fi community. Octavia E Butler, maybe the best known pitch-black female sci-fi writer, has said that she found herself alienated from the characters in the books she read. Okorafor admits to not having read much sci-fi growing up, but, like Butler, struggled to identify with supporters when she did.” It just seemed like a exceedingly infertile, white male macrocosm ,” she adds.” I would move towards attributes who were alien, or animals .”

Today, though, marginalised pitch-black girls and young women with a enjoy for manga, gaming, or robotics, can find one another online. Facebook communities include Black Girl Nerds– which has 126,000 admirers- and its offshoot, Black Girl Geeks, which has more than 38,000 followers on Twitter. Black female geeks are also being celebrated on screen: the film Hidden Illustrations– about the African American mathematicians who played a vital role in the space race- was one of the biggest cinemas at the box office in 2016.

Venomverse
Venomverse( A Blessing in Disguise) by Marvel. Photo: Tana Ford/ Marvel

Asked how she feels about being called a geek, Okorafor gets animated, but then, as she did on the TED stage, she refuses expectancies:” For a very long time, I refused to call myself a geek or a nerd because I was also an athlete ,” she supposes.” I was always the first minor picked for units .” She reminisces merrily for several minutes about playing dodgeball and semi-pro tennis, and parodies about her phenomenal upper-body strength:” My mum are applied to hurl the javelin. I’ve got her arms. I can do one-handed pull-ups ,” she responds with a intimate of pride.

Raised in the southern outskirts of Chicago, where she and her sisters would be called appoints and chased by skinheads, Okorafor grew up appearing like an outsider. She has, however, moved that perspective to her advantage, seeing personas and determines who aggressively distinguish from their mainstream portrait; Who Fears Death, for example, is set in a post-apocalyptic Sudan and mixtures fantasy with magical realism.

Although she may have been too sporting in her youth to fit the geek mould, Okorafor now detects consolation in the variety within the geek parish. At San Diego Comic-Con this year with her daughter, she marvelled at the display of people in cosplay outfits.” We were like:’ This is awesome. Everyone is just being what they are .’ I like the diversification- there are so many different types of strange .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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‘ So many different types of strange ‘: how Nnedi Okorafor is changing the face of sci-fi

/ by / Tags: , , , ,

With a Marvel comic under her region and a novel being adapted for TV by HBO, the Nigerian-American scribe is flying the flag for pitch-black, female geeks

As the science fiction novelist Nnedi Okorafor takes to the stage at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, she challenges stereotypes before she has said a word. The 43 -year-old writer who won the 2016 Hugo award( the Oscars of the sci-fi world-wide) for best novella doesn’t look like much of a geek. Yes, she wears oversized glasses, but Okorafor’s specs are stylish, royal-blue Cat-Eyes , not wiry aviators. And, crucially, she happens to be a pitch-black woman.

The Nigerian-American’s success has been applauded as a succes by their home communities that have all along applauded her on from the margins. So when she tweeted on 11 August that she was working on her first projection with the comic publisher Marvel, followers were stimulated. (” A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian female. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive ,” wrote one love on Twitter) And with a fiction, Who Fears Death, to be adapted for TV by HBO( George RR Martin is its manager creator) Okorafor is about to go from the solitary geek reference-point for young African females to everybody’s favourite new sci-fi writer.

Nnedi
Nnedi Okorafor … don’t announce her a geek. Photo: Beth Gwinn/ Must Credit: Beth Gwinn/ Writer Pictures

Okorafor is not the only black maiden pulsating a course in the sometimes hostile and isolating world-wide of science fiction. NK Jemisin, who won the Hugo award for good novel two years in a row, was called an” educated but naive heathen” by the US far-right activist Theodore Beale, who has long railed against the increasingly diverse sci-fi community. Octavia E Butler, maybe the best known pitch-black girl sci-fi writer, has said that she found herself alienated from the specific characteristics in the books she read. Okorafor declares to not having spoken much sci-fi growing up, but, like Butler, struggled to identify with supporters when she did.” It just seemed like a exceedingly sterile, grey male world-wide ,” she pronounces.” I would migrate towards reputations “whos” alien, or swine .”

Today, though, marginalised black girls and young women with a love for manga, gaming, or robotics, can find one another online. Facebook communities include Black Girl Nerds– which has 126,000 followers- and its outgrowth, Black Girl Geeks, which has more than 38,000 followers on Twitter. Black female geeks are also being celebrated on screen: the cinema Hidden Fleshes– about the African American mathematicians who played a vital role in the space race- was one of the biggest movies at the box office in 2016.

Venomverse
Venomverse( A Blessing in Disguise) by Marvel. Photograph: Tana Ford/ Marvel

Asked how she feels about being called a geek, Okorafor gets animated, but then, as she did on the TED stage, she defies expectations:” For a long time, I refused to call myself a geek or a nerd because I was also an athlete ,” she speaks.” I was always the first boy picked for crews .” She remembers merrily for several minutes about playing dodgeball and semi-pro tennis, and jokes about her phenomenal upper-body fortitude:” My mum used to throw the javelin. I’ve got her arms. I can do one-handed pull-ups ,” she enunciates with a suggestion of pride.

Raised in the southern neighbourhoods of Chicago, where she and her sisters would be called figures and chased by skinheads, Okorafor grew up feeling like an intruder. She has, nonetheless, diverted that position to her advantage, foreseeing references and prepares who crisply distinguish from their mainstream depicting; Who Fears Death, for example, is set in a post-apocalyptic Sudan and combinations fantasy with supernatural realism.

Although she may have been too athletic in her boy to fit the geek mould, Okorafor now observes comfort in the variety within the geek community. At San Diego Comic-Con this year with her daughter, she marvelled at the array of parties in cosplay garbs.” We were like:’ This is awesome. Everyone is just being what they are .’ I like the diversity- there are so many different types of strange .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE