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‘Mmmm, it was electrifying !’ Natalia Osipova on see her perfect spouse

As the explosively strong dancer induces the leap into film, she talks about feeling murderous and bruised by her recent toil and how adoration her dogs promotions her perform

Natalia Osipova was standing in a queue at Moscow airport recently, waiting for her flight back to London, when she overheard a woman mention her appoint.” She was talking about the evidence ,” says Osipova, who had just finished performing The Mother, a contemporary dance drama.” The female said,’ She could have danced another classical ballet. Why is she spending her age on this ?'” Osipova rustles.” I felt fairly vulnerable. Why am I not understood ?”

Some of her fans might not be ready to accompany the Russian ballerina on her odyssey into experimental dance, but Osipova is an artist who relies her inclinations: from her 2001 decision to walk out of one of the world’s most prestigious ballet fellowships, the Bolshoi, in favour of a second-tier institution, the Mikhailovsky Theatre, to launching a similarity profession in contemporary dance while still one of the top classical ballerinas.

Now a principal with the Royal Ballet, and boasting a nonstop freelance planned on the side, Osipova is a powerful dancer of explosive jumps and drastic ferocity. Her passion and self-belief give the title to Force of Nature Natalia, a new film by head Gerry Fox that follows Osipova as she rehearses for three substantiates: La Bayadere at the Royal Ballet; The Mother, Arthur Pita’s dark retelling of the Hans Christian Andersen story; and a new duet created with dancer and Osipova’s fiance Jason Kittelberger, more of whom later.

Osipova
Osipova with Vadim Muntagirov in La Bayadere. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/ The Guardian

We meet at her flat in Little Venice, London- smart modern decoration and the feel of someone who’s not home much- where we are joined by an translator and two over-excited pups. Osipova, 33, is very straightforward , not starry or effusive- unlike when she gets on stage, when she’ll propel herself towards drastic extremes. The Mother, a two-hander based on the bleak tale of a woman desperately trying to save her dying baby, often leaves Osipova blooded and bruised from its physical floorwork and emotionally measured to reach the heart of the character.

” I’m not a mother myself hitherto ,” she says,” so I was anxious that it wouldn’t be a realistic characterization because I don’t know what it’s like .” It’s same to how you feel about your bird-dogs, I tell her, but ages a hundred.” It’s funny you obligate that analogy ,” she chuckles,” because when we got them, they were just puppies, two months old. And in a way, my feeling about them fed into the part .”

We talk about how uncommon it is in dance to depict something other than nostalgic enjoy.” Traditionally in ballet ,” she says,” you are expressing love for a man and there are very few exceptions. In my occupation, I can only think of Kenneth MacMillan’s Anastasia .”( Premiered in 1967, Anastasia is about a woman who claimed to be the daughter of tsar Nicholas II .)” In contemporary ,” Osipova contributes,” it’s different. Sometimes we speak just about physiology, sexuality …” She pauses and chuckles.” But the men are always there somewhere !”

Bleak
Bleak narrative … Osipova in The Mother at Gorky Moscow Art theatre. Photograph: Mikhail Metzel/ Tass

Of course, two people, two figures connecting, is something dance can express well. But Osipova is as interested in explain the realities of relationships as well as the fairytale ideals. Last-place year, in her self-curated programme Pure Dance, she and Kittelberger acted Roy Assaf’s Six Years Later, a likenes of a tired and tetchy relationship, in which, the noted New York Times critic Siobhan Burke, Kittelberger developed as an equal to the charismatic Osipova on stage.

Dancing with Kittelberger was a revelation for Osipova.” It was so, so different to dancing with a classical dancer ,” she says.” It was like a real person, certainly touching me, and it was like,’ Mmmm !'” Her bright eyes expanded with mischief at the retention.” It was electrifying. He actually showed me a different way of experiencing dance .”

Gerry Fox, who filmed the couple dancing in the studio, talks about their” erotic strain, two people committing their all through their bodies and being so free with each other “. Osipova has danced with numerous notable collaborators, including former lovers Ivan Vasiliev and Sergei Polunin, but this was different.” So different ,” she says. The movie sees them “workin on” a brand-new creation, I’m Fine, about the ups and downs of a relationship.” The title comes from me personally, when I’m irked or indignant- saying’ I’m fine !’ when it’s clear I’m not .” Kittelberger formed the steps (” That’s not my strong point “) and Osipova was dramaturg.” I’m more sensitive to the story ,” she says.” I’m strong on version. That’s the offering I have .”

Kittelberger caters Osipova with essential support off stagecoach as well as on.” If I’m in an intensive assignment, I become more needy ,” she says.” I need more solace, and if I don’t get it I become indignant. I need a lot of attention, especially from boys- perhaps because my dad had such a comforting, astounding vigor. Jason really gets it and gives me everything I need.

‘It
‘ It was like a real person, actually stroking me’ … Natalia Osipova and Jason Kittelberger in Six Years Later. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/ The Guardian

” He does identify a bit of the child in me, in a good way. I’m very aware of my own superpower. Physically and emotionally, I’m a really strong person, in arts and in life. But there are times when you want to totally impart it away and be helpless, and he’s somebody who can allow me to do that .”

As well as exploring her escapades in contemporary dance, Fox’s documentary discusses one of Osipova’s most feted classical characters: Giselle, the beautiful young peasant daughter who descends for a hypocritical nobleman. “Giselle,” Osipova tells the camera at one point, “it’s me.” What did she intend?” It’s the most natural part for me ,” she says.” The second play is so close to me, as if I have it somewhere in my DNA .”

Osipova is not the ghostly spirit of a wronged woman, as Giselle becomes in act two, but her entire physicality modifies as she represents the capacity- a more evocative, chilling and unhuman Giselle than any I’ve seen.” When I started dancing it, I was 19 or 20, and I was doing it in a extremely non-traditional way. My coaches would be telling me off, but I had such an inner certainty that it was impossible to knock it out of me .” Where does that confidence come from?” From my late connection to the part- and my peaceful certainty that this is how it should be .”

When Osipova began her career at the Bolshoi, the head was Alexei Ratmansky,” who dedicated quite a lot of democracy “. But when he was supplanted by Sergei Filin, Osipova observed herself unhappy in Moscow, her possibilities limited. She’s material now at the Royal Ballet, a company with a healthier culture than most she has suffered.” The first time I came I was surprised there was no intrigue or conflict, and people were nice to each other ,” she says.” It’s my fifth season now and I’ve had not a single conflict. Sometimes people say I just don’t get enough of the language to know !” She chuckles.” But in other corporations, you can sense it, when people are resentful, or don’t want you to be there, or they’re talking behind your back. I can’t work like that .”

Does something about the nature of ballet corporations engender a dysfunctional atmosphere? Filin was the victim of an acid attack orchestrated by a disgruntled dancer, and New York City Ballet has been rocked by accusations of harassment and misuse.” It all depends on who is leading, and what they encourage and what they cut off ,” says Osipova.” I can think of two the circumstances in which[ Royal Ballet director] Kevin O’Hare said,’ This is not happening ‘, otherwise something distressing might have started .”

Watch the trailer for Force of Nature Natalia on Vimeo

The pressure, the egoes, the ferocity of a dancer’s life have certainly been blamed for more than one artistic outburst. Osipova’s ex, Polunin, is an example of this, with his recentmacho and fat-shaming tirades online. The contentious dancer had this to say about male dancers:” Females now trying to take on the man role because you don’t f— them and because you are an embarrassment .” He also wrote:” Let’s slap fatty people .”

Osipova has gone on record saying Polunin is a good guy who should be judged merely on his dancing. Why does she think he is so frequently self-destructive?” No one but him can answer your question ,” she says.” He’s clearly gifted, and I really said that he hoped that he nourishes it rather than subverts it .”

Osipova seems able to harness all the drama and drive for her dancing and thinks she has another five years of performing at her pinnacle.” At the moment, I feel very mature and capable, emotionally and physically ,” she says.” Contemporary dance is seeing my person feel and move differently. It’s a really good time for me now .”

* The Mother is at Queen Elizabeth Hall, London, 20 -2 2 June. Force of Nature Natalia is out now and will be broadcast on Sky Arts on 18 June.

This article contains affiliate relates, which means we may earn a small commission if a reader clicks through and makes a purchase. All our journalism is independent and is in no way influenced by any advertiser or commercial-grade initiative. By clicking on an affiliate associate, you accept that third-party cookies will be set. More information.

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The final frontier: how female administrators burst into sci-fi

It was seen as a job for the boys. Thats reforming thanks to the likes of Ava DuVernay, Patty Jenkins and Claire Denis being given opportunities to oversee big-budget productions

Critical reactions to Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time may have been mixed, but there’s no denying it is a cinema landmark. DuVernay is not just the first maiden of colour to steer a $100 m( PS72m) movie, but a member of a exceedingly exclusive team- female administrators of big-budget science fiction.

It is sobering to be recognised that Kathryn Bigelow’s $42 m sci-fi noir Strange Days was exhausted almost a quarter of a hundred years ago. It was a resounding bust, which no doubt persuaded studios that maidens should not be allowed to direct the category at all. Since then, we have also had Cloud Atlas and Jupiter Ascending from the Wachowskis. But one can’t help wondering if, back in 1999, Warner Bros would have entrusted The Matrix’s $60 m budget to got a couple of relative unknowns if they had been called Lilly and Lana, instead of Larry and Andy.

The next high-profile sci-fi film directed by a woman will be Claire Denis’ first English-language cinema, High Life, starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche on a spaceship. But Denis is French, and a 2014 examination found that nearly a quarter of France’s film directors were female, compared against single anatomies for the US. Sci-fi movies inevitably ask large-hearted funds, and Hollywood is notoriously reluctant to admit girlfriends into a boys’ playground where Colin Trevorrow, Josh Trank, Gareth Edwards and Jordan Vogt-Roberts were all given blockbusters to send after a single indie slam, whereas Patty Jenkins had to wait 14 years between Monster and Wonder Woman.

Robert
Robert Pattinson in Claire Denis’ High Life. Photograph: PR Company Handout

But sci-fi is still intensely protected masculine region. The text “science” doesn’t help, adjudicating by men’s rights shift support for James Damore, the Google engineer fired for claiming the gender imbalance in the science and technology sectors was a result of biological differences. Or for the Sad Puppies movement agitating for a return to pre-diversity science fiction. Or never-ending Gamergate nonsense, or whingeing about Star Wars being sullied by women or people of colour. Sci-fi is a cultural Custer’s Last Stand for fanaticism. Sometimes it’s just easier to cave in and call it speculative fiction.

Yet it is clear that blockbusters such as Passengers and Jurassic World could have benefited from more female input, if exclusively to be underlined that dames don’t usually fall in love with creepy-crawly stalkers or go on safari in spike heel. It’s not that we need more kick-ass sci-fi heroines so much as a wider perspective on technological and ethical issues in the imagined future.

In the 200 th commemoration of the publication of one of science fiction’s cornerstone texts, written by a woman, it is dispiriting to reflect that no female head has ever been allowed anywhere near any of the dozens of screen modifications of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

But the way forward for would-be female sci-fi film-makers is surely honing their craft in the low-budget sector, following in the paces of outliers. For speciman, there is Lizzie Borden, whose 1983 faux-documentary Born in Flames images a dystopic New York in which women mobilise against a post-revolutionary socialist US government( a sci-fi idea in itself ). Or- in terminated comparison- Susan Seidelman, whose sci-fi romcom Making Mr Right( 1987) starrings John Malkovich as goofy android enjoy interest.

More recent girl sci-fi directors have floundered on a crucial failure to engage the audience, and a lack of the narrative focus seen in low-budget male-directed cinemas such as Predestination, Coherence or Time Lapse. The opinions are there, but the aircraft needs work.

Jennifer Phang’s Advantageous, in which a single mom experiences an experimental procedure to represent herself search younger and more ethnically ambiguous, fails to merge intriguing thoughts into a dramatically fulfilling whole. Ana Lily Amirpour’s The Bad Batch begins in sensational form as the protagonist loses a couple of extremities to cannibals, but the floor runs out of gas. Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest stars Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood as sisters holed up in an isolated house during a technological breakdown, but Rozema prefers monotonous sisterhood cliches over her story’s sci-fi themes.

Angela
Angela Bassett in Kathryn Bigelow’s Strange Days. Photograph: Allstar/ Cinetext/ 20 CENTURY FOX

A more promising use of that mainstay preparing of low-budget sci-fi, the post-apocalyptic huis clos [ no departure ], is Stephanie Joalland’s writing-directing introduction The Quiet Hour, a British/ Irish co-production in which siblings are circumvented by foreigners and human predators in a remote farmhouse. Joalland says the micro-budget pressured her to keep the science fiction elements in the background, and it is true the results are maybe a little too low-key for modern delicacies, but she is keen to explore the genre further.” My next movie, Ice, deals with neuroscience and will pave the way for my more ambitious project, The Seedling, which is set in the future and deals with global warming and biotechnologies ,” she says.

” I don’t onu myself with too many concerns with regard to gender dynamics, to be honest .” But Joalland is optimistic about a future in which female chairmen are” making studio movies and superseding, and thus creating a compound effect of inspiring a younger generation of female sci-fi writers and administrators “. So get to it, female sci-fi film-makers- the future is yours for the taking.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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‘Mmmm, it was electrifying !’ Natalia Osipova on discover her perfect marriage

As the explosively potent dancer obliges the leap into movie, she talks about feeling blooded and bruised by her recent labour and how adoration her bird-dogs helps her perform

Natalia Osipova was standing in a queue at Moscow airport recently, waiting for her flight back to London, when she overheard a woman mention her name.” She was talking about the present ,” says Osipova, who had just finished performing The Mother, a contemporary dance drama.” The dame said,’ She could have danced another classical ballet. Why is she spending her hour on this ?'” Osipova rustles.” I felt quite susceptible. Why am I not understood ?”

Some of her fans might not be ready to accompany the Russian ballerina on her journey into experimental dance, but Osipova is an artist who trusts her impulses: from her 2001 decision to walk out of one of the world’s most prestigious ballet fellowships, the Bolshoi, in favour of a second-tier institution, the Mikhailovsky Theatre, to launching a parallel career in contemporary dance while continuing to one of the top classical ballerinas.

Now a principal with the Royal Ballet, and boasting a nonstop freelance schedule on the side, Osipova is a potent dancer of explosive jumps and spectacular vigour. Her passion and self-belief give the title to Force of Nature Natalia, a brand-new documentary by head Gerry Fox that follows Osipova as she rehearses for three testifies: La Bayadere at the Royal Ballet; The Mother, Arthur Pita’s dark retelling of the Hans Christian Andersen story; and a new duet created with dancer and Osipova’s fiance Jason Kittelberger, more of whom later.

Osipova
Osipova with Vadim Muntagirov in La Bayadere. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/ The Guardian

We meet at her flat in Little Venice, London- smart-alecky modern decor and the feel of someone who’s not home much- where we are joined by an interpreter and two over-excited bird-dogs. Osipova, 33, is very straightforward , not starry or effusive- unlike when she gets on stagecoach, when she’ll propel herself towards spectacular extremes. The Mother, a two-hander based on the desolate fib of a woman urgently trying to save her dying baby, often leaves Osipova bloody-minded and bruised from its physical floorwork and emotionally researched to reach the heart of the character.

” I’m not a mother myself yet ,” she says,” so I was anxious that it wouldn’t be a realistic portrayal because I don’t know what it’s like .” It’s similar to how you feel about your pups, I tell her, but epoches a hundred.” It’s funny you reach that comparing ,” she giggles,” because when we got them, they were just puppies, 2 month old-fashioned. And in a way, my feeling about them fed into the part .”

We talk about how uncommon it is in dance to illustrate something other than romantic enjoy.” Traditionally in ballet ,” she says,” you are expressing enjoyed for a man and there are very few exceptions. In my career, I can only think of Kenneth MacMillan’s Anastasia .”( Premiered in 1967, Anastasia is about a woman who claimed to be the daughter of tsar Nicholas II .)” In contemporary ,” Osipova contributes,” it’s different. Sometimes we speak just about physiology, virility …” She pauses and laughs.” But the men are always there somewhere !”

Bleak
Bleak narrative … Osipova in The Mother at Gorky Moscow Art theatre. Photograph: Mikhail Metzel/ Tass

Of course, two parties, two organizations connecting, is something dance can express well. But Osipova is as interested in describe the realities of relationships as well as the fairytale standards. Last time, in her self-curated curriculum Pure Dance, she and Kittelberger play-act Roy Assaf’s Six Years Later, a painting of a tired and tetchy rapport, in which, the noted New York Times critic Siobhan Burke, Kittelberger developed as an equal to the charismatic Osipova on stage.

Dancing with Kittelberger was a revelation for Osipova.” It was so, so very different to dancing with a classical dancer ,” she says.” It was like a real person, really stroking me, and it was like,’ Mmmm !'” Her bright gazes expanded with mischief at the memory.” It was electrifying. He genuinely showed me a different way of knowing dance .”

Gerry Fox, who filmed the couple dancing in the studio, talks about their” sensual strain, two people paying their all through their bodies and being so free with each other “. Osipova has danced with many conspicuous marriages, including former boyfriends Ivan Vasiliev and Sergei Polunin, but this was different.” So different ,” she says. The movie identifies them “workin on” a brand-new formation, I’m Fine, about the ups and downs of a relationship.” The claim comes from me personally, when I’m harassed or furious- saying’ I’m fine !’ when it’s clear I’m not .” Kittelberger developed the steps (” That’s not my strong point “) and Osipova was dramaturg.” I’m more sensitive to the story ,” she says.” I’m strong on reading. That’s the talent I have .”

Kittelberger affords Osipova with essential support off stage as well as on.” If I’m in an intensive campaign, I become more needy ,” she says.” I need more convenience, and if I don’t get it I become indignant. I need a lot of attention, especially from soldiers- maybe because my father had such a comforting, stunning power. Jason actually gets it and gives me everything I need.

‘It
‘ It was like a real person, truly stroking me’ … Natalia Osipova and Jason Kittelberger in Six Years Later. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/ The Guardian

” He does appreciate a bit of the child in me, in a good way. I’m extremely aware of my own ability. Physically and emotionally, I’m a really strong person, in arts and in life. But there are times when you want to totally cause it away and be helpless, and he’s somebody who can allow me to do that .”

As well as exploring her adventures in contemporary dance, Fox’s documentary discusses one of Osipova’s most feted classical capacities: Giselle, the beautiful young boor girl who drops for a hypocritical nobleman. “Giselle,” Osipova tells the camera at one point, “it’s me.” What did she entail?” It’s the most natural part for me ,” she says.” The second routine is so close to me, as if I have it somewhere in my DNA .”

Osipova is not the ghostly tone of a wronged lady, as Giselle becomes in act two, but her entire physicality modifies as she embodies the persona- a more colors, chilling and unhuman Giselle than any I’ve seen.” When I started dancing it, I was 19 or 20, and I was doing it in a exceedingly non-traditional way. My coaches would be telling me off, but I had such an inner certainty that it was not feasible to knock it out of me .” Where does that confidence comes here?” From my deep connection to the part- and my peaceful certainty that this is how it is right to .”

When Osipova began her occupation at the Bolshoi, the head was Alexei Ratmansky,” who handed quite a lot of freedom “. But when he was attained by Sergei Filin, Osipova knew herself unhappy in Moscow, her openings limited. She’s material now at the Royal Ballet, a company with a healthier culture than most she has experienced.” The first time I came I was astounded there was no intrigue or conflict, and people were nice to each other ,” she says.” It’s my fifth season now and I’ve had not a single conflict. Sometimes people say I merely don’t get enough of the language to know !” She chuckles.” But in other companionships, you can sense it, when we are envious, or don’t want you to be there, or they’re talking behind your back. I can’t work like that .”

Does something about the specific features of ballet corporations provoke a dysfunctional flavor? Filin was the victim of an acid onslaught orchestrated by a disgruntled dancer, and New York City Ballet has been rocked by accusations of harassment and mistreat.” It all depends on who is leading, and what the fuck is encourage and what they cut off ,” says Osipova.” I can think of two the circumstances in which[ Royal Ballet administrator] Kevin O’Hare said,’ This is not happening ‘, otherwise something distasteful might have started .”

Watch the trailer for Force of Nature Natalia on Vimeo

The pressure, the self-love, the severity of a dancer’s life have certainly been blamed for more than one artistic outburst. Osipova’s ex, Polunin, is a case in point, with his recentmacho and fat-shaming tirades online. The controversial dancer had this to say about male dancers:” Girls now trying to take on the man role because you don’t f— them and because you are an embarrassment .” He likewise wrote:” Let’s slap fatty beings .”

Osipova has gone on record saying Polunin is a good guy who should be judged exclusively on his dancing. Why does she think he is so frequently self-destructive?” No one but him can answer your question ,” she says.” He’s clearly knack, and I genuinely said that he hoped that he nurtures it rather than erodes it .”

Osipova seems able to harness all the drama and drive for her dancing and thinks she has another five years of performing at her pinnacle.” At the moment, I feel very mature and capable, emotionally and physically ,” she says.” Contemporary dance is stimulating my body feel and move differently. It’s a really good time for me now .”

* The Mother is at Queen Elizabeth Hall, London, 20 -2 2 June. Force of Nature Natalia is out now and will be broadcast on Sky Arts on 18 June.

Such articles contains affiliate attaches, which means we may earn a small commission if a reader clicks through and makes a purchase. All our journalism is independent and is in no way influenced by any advertiser or commercial-grade initiative. By clicking on an affiliate link, you accept that third-party cookies will be established. More information.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Barbra Streisand exposes she cloned her puppy twice

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Singer and performer tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has divulged she successfully obliged two clones of her pet dog after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have different temperaments ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown eyes and her seriousness .”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she garmented them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their advent, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand adopted her and imparted her the call Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her performing career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she prevailed an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but told me that she never liked the film.

” I envisaged I was absolutely miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

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Barbra Streisand discloses she cloned her bird-dog twice

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Singer and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has divulged she successfully cleared two clones of her baby puppy after it died last year.

The singer and actor told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, announced Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown eyes and her seriousness .”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she garmented them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their advent, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was announced Funny Girl, but Streisand chose her and caused her the refer Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her play career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she won an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I anticipated I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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The final frontier: how female chairmen burst into sci-fi

It was seen as a job for the sons. Thats varying thanks to the likes of Ava DuVernay, Patty Jenkins and Claire Denis being given opportunities to oversee big-budget productions

Critical reactions to Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time may have been desegregated, but there’s no denying it is a cinema landmark. DuVernay is not just the first female of colour to send a $100 m( PS72m) movie, but a is part of a exceedingly exclusive sorority- female chairmen of big-budget science fiction.

It is sobering to realise that Kathryn Bigelow’s $42 m sci-fi noir Strange Days was exhausted almost a quarter of a hundred years ago. It was a resounding flop, which no doubt convinced studios that dames is not permitted to direct the category at all. Since then, we have also had Cloud Atlas and Jupiter Ascending from the Wachowskis. But one can’t help wondering if, back in 1999, Warner Bros would have entrusted The Matrix’s $60 m budget to a couple of relative unknowns if they had been called Lilly and Lana, instead of Larry and Andy.

The next high-profile sci-fi film directed by a woman will be Claire Denis’ first English-language movie, High Life, starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche on a spaceship. But Denis is French, and a 2014 inspection found that nearly a quarter of France’s film directors are women, compared to single chassis for the US. Sci-fi movies inevitably expect big plans, and Hollywood is notoriously reluctant to admit girlfriends into a boys’ playground where Colin Trevorrow, Josh Trank, Gareth Edwards and Jordan Vogt-Roberts were all given blockbusters to aim after a single indie collision, whereas Patty Jenkins had to wait 14 years between Monster and Wonder Woman.

Robert
Robert Pattinson in Claire Denis’ High Life. Photograph: PR Company Handout

But sci-fi is still strenuously represented masculine domain. The parole “science” doesn’t help, adjudicating by men’s rights movement support for James Damore, the Google engineer shot for claiming the gender inequality in the science and technology sectors was a result of biological gaps. Or for the Sad Puppies movement agitating for a return to pre-diversity science fiction. Or never-ending Gamergate nonsense, or whingeing about Star Wars being sullied by women or people of colour. Sci-fi is a cultural Custer’s Last-place Stand for injustice. Sometimes it’s just easier to cave in and call it speculative fiction.

Yet it is clear that blockbusters such as Passengers and Jurassic World could have benefited from more female input, if only to point out that girls don’t often fall in love with creepy stalkers or go on safari in spike heel. It’s not that we need more kick-ass sci-fi heroines so much as a wider perspective on technological and ethical issues in the imagined future.

In the 200 th anniversary of the publication of one of science fiction’s cornerstone texts, written by a woman, it is dispiriting to reflect that no female chairman has ever been allowed anywhere near any of the dozens of screen adjustments of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

But the way forward for would-be female sci-fi film-makers is surely honing their craft in the low-budget sector, following in the paces of outliers. For pattern, there is Lizzie Borden, whose 1983 faux-documentary Born in Flames outlines a dystopic New York in which women mobilise against a post-revolutionary socialist US government( a sci-fi theory in itself ). Or- in ended compare- Susan Seidelman, whose sci-fi romcom Making Mr Right( 1987) stellars John Malkovich as goofy android charity interest.

More recent girl sci-fi directors have struggled on a crucial failure to engage the audience, and a lack of the narrative focus seen in low-budget male-directed movies such as Predestination, Coherence or Time Lapse. The intuitions are there, but the skill needs work.

Jennifer Phang’s Advantageous, in which a single baby experiences an experimental procedure to constitute herself seem youngest and more ethnically equivocal, fails to merge intriguing hypothesis into a dramatically slaking whole. Ana Lily Amirpour’s The Bad Batch beginning in sensational mode as the heroine loses got a couple of appendages to cannibals, but the storey runs out of gas. Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest stars Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood as sisters holed up in an segregated home during a technological collapse, but Rozema promotes monotonous sisterhood cliches over her story’s sci-fi themes.

Angela
Angela Bassett in Kathryn Bigelow’s Strange Days. Photograph: Allstar/ Cinetext/ 20 CENTURY FOX

A more promising use of that linchpin giving of low-budget sci-fi, the post-apocalyptic huis clos [ no departure ], is Stephanie Joalland’s writing-directing introduction The Quiet Hour, a British/ Irish co-production in which siblings are circumvented by immigrants and human predators in a remote farmhouse. Joalland says the micro-budget obliged her to keep the science fiction constituents in the background, and it is true the results are maybe a little too low-key for modern savours, but she is keen to explore the category further.” My next movie, Ice, deals with neuroscience and will pave the way for my more ambitious project, The Seedling, which is set in the future and deals with global warming and biotechnologies ,” she says.

” I don’t load myself with too many concerns with regard to gender dynamics, to be honest .” But Joalland is optimistic about a future in which female directors are” constituting studio movies and attaining, and thus creating a compound effect of inspiring a younger generation of female sci-fi writers and administrators “. So got to get it, female sci-fi film-makers- the future is yours for the taking.

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Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her puppy twice

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Singer and performer tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has uncovered she successfully formed two clones of her baby dog after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown gazes and her seriousness .”

In the interrogation, Streisand said when the cloned pups arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their entrance, Streisand said she became smitten with another dog, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was announced Funny Girl, but Streisand chose her and dedicated her the refer Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her act career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she won an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I belief I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her pup twice

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Singer and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has discovered she successfully became two clones of her pet hound after it died last year.

The singer and performer told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have differing personalities ,” Streisand said of the puppies, called Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown gazes and her seriousness .”

In the interrogation, Streisand said when the cloned dogs arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their entrance, Streisand said she became smitten with another puppy, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand adopted her and made her the epithet Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her performance career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she triumphed an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but said she never liked the film.

” I fantasized I was totally miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Barbra Streisand discovers she cloned her hound twice

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Singer and performer tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year

Barbra Streisand has discovered she successfully formed two clones of her baby dog after it died last year.

The singer and actor told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14 -year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha.

” They have different temperaments ,” Streisand said of the puppies, announced Miss Scarlett and Miss Violet.” I’m waiting for them to get older so I can see if they have her brown gazes and her seriousness .”

In the interview, Streisand said when the cloned puppies arrived, she dressed them in red and lavender to tell them apart, which is how they got their names.

While waiting for their arrival, Streisand said she became smitten with another dog, which was a distant relation of Samantha.

The Coton de Tulear dog was called Funny Girl, but Streisand borrowed her and contributed her the call Miss Fanny, which is how Fanny Brice’s dresser refers to Streisand’s character in the 1968 musical that launched her react career.

Streisand followed Funny Girl, for which she prevailed an Oscar, with Hello Dolly !, but told me that she never liked the film.

” I saw I was altogether miscast. I tried to get out of it ,” she told Variety.” I think it’s so silly. It’s so old-time musical .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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2019 Needed a Hit as Bleak as Chernobyl

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Animals are dying in droves across the globe. It’s 123 grades in India. US politics are a garbage fire. Cankers eradicated by discipline have been reanimated by stupidity. Technology meant to unite people has divided them instead.

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