Tag Archives: Cats

Are pets really good for us – or just hairy health hazards?

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Many animal-lovers think a cat or dog can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the science back them up?

My childhood dog was called Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who oozed bravado and bravery. Yet, underneath it all, he struggled with the dog version of impostor syndrome. Biff was a bag of masked insecurity. He was like the kid in school who says he has seen all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where scary movies are played; the kid who has “a girlfriend at another school”. It was that fragile side I especially loved about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an insecurity that neither of us had the cognitive skills to put into words. This was a friendship – one that lasted as he grew older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and loved nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coats. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash – but, every few nights, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked hands and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the sensation was tickly and calming, and never once disgusting, even though those around me told me it was not a good idea, mainly because it was highly likely that, on any given day, Biff had stuck his snout into some poor fox’s rotting cadaver. I didn’t care. I washed my hands like a surgeon afterwards, obviously. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff (I’m nearly 40), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own dog. This feels like a very big decision. Part of the reason we want a dog is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flutter anxiously in the pit of my stomach. Will having a pet really make us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet always make us better people?

Having
Having a dog could make you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/Getty Images

The good news, at face value, is this: if you are looking for proof that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence abounds. For instance, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate (and the pet’s), easing your body into a less stressed condition. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and cats to snakes and goats. And there’s more. There’s evidence from Germany and Australia (sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners make fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Just last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having pets, especially cats and dogs. Scientists suspect that by roaming the wild and bringing novel bacteria back into our houses, some pets may introduce our immune systems to pathogens we would not otherwise meet, allowing pet-owners (and particularly children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 homes in the US, for instance, found that the presence of dogs and cats led to more variety in 56 and 24 classes of bacterial species respectively. This may explain another study suggesting that exposure to dogs early in a baby’s life may make them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A loving owner can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise would have had: always-friendly faces, constant compassion, cuddles and hands to lick late at night – not just to help pathogenic resistance but just because it makes both parties happier, warmer and more contented residents of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, loving home. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but research has shown that dogs and cats see a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much affection for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it really does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection reveals some problematic and murkier truths.

As many academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health – income, for instance, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be that those with more money can, on the whole, afford the luxuries of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 families failed to find a relationship between owning a pet and overall health after correcting for income and the affluency of the local neighbourhood. Other studies have had similar results. And some even suggest pets are bad for us. One study of 21,000 people in Finland, for instance, suggested that pet owners are more, not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some pretty alarming downsides to pet ownership. In England, for instance, between 6,000 and 7,000 people are admitted to hospital for dog bites each year. Tripping over pets is another potential danger – each year, this sends an estimated 87,000 people to hospitals in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house – the fleas, ticks and mites? And the potentially fatal diseases they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella (from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that can be passed to humans in cat and dog saliva? For many people, the answer to whether pets are good for us is clearly no – although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or violence by another human than by a dog, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are emotional downsides, too. One of the often forgotten aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with diseases that last months or years. Assuming you are a responsible pet owner, who takes this as seriously as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy emotional burden. A 2017 study involving 238 human participants found that pet owners with chronically ill pets had higher levels of stress and anxiety, coupled with a lower quality of life. And after death? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead cat is not going to appear in an advert for Pets at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a home could mean sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that pets always make us happier than the fact that so many of us get an animal, only to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” dogs: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres has risen by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You need only scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments to see how often certain dog breeds are viewed as lifestyle accessories rather than living, breathing animals with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to put all these pros and cons into a melting pot and come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not pets are good for us, what would the answer be? The answer would be … complicated. Because humans and our circumstances are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has good and bad sides, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a pet and to consider the bad times, too: the insecurity, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I have talked my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving animals doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a pet can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Are domesticateds really good for us- or exactly hairy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers speculate a “cat-o-nine-tail” or pup can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the science back them up?

My childhood dog was announced Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who gushed bravado and courage. Yet, underneath it all, he struggled with the dog version of hypocrite disorder. Biff was a bag of disguised anxiety. He was like the kid in academy who says he has read all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where scary movies are played; the boy who has ” a girlfriend at another academy “. It was that fragile line-up I especially adoration about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an anxiety that neither of us had the cognitive knowledge to put into messages. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he ripened older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and desired nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coats. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few nighttimes, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked sides and wrists to his heart’s material. For me, the wizard was tickly and tranquilize, and never formerly outraging, even though those around me told me it was not a good hypothesi, chiefly because it was highly likely that, on any afforded epoch, Biff had fix his snout into some poor fox’s decompose cadaver. I didn’t care. I showered my hands like a surgeon afterwards, clearly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m nearly 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own puppy. This may seem like a very big decision. Part of the reason we want a puppy is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flit anxiously in the quarry of my stomach. Will having a pet truly obligate us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet ever obligate us better beings?

Having
Having a bird-dog could do you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good bulletin, at face value, is this: if you are searching for proof that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence presented abounds. For speciman, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your form into a less emphasized circumstance. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and “cat-o-nine-tails” to serpents and goats. And there’s more. There’s manifestation from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners prepare fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Simply last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having domesticateds, specially cats and bird-dogs. Scientists suspect that by roaming the wild and making novel bacteria back into our houses, some babies may establish our immune systems to pathogens we would not otherwise meet, earmarking pet-owners( and particularly children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 residences in the US, for instance, found that the presence of hounds and cats led to more assortment in 56 and 24 categorizes of bacterial species respectively. This may show another study suggesting that exposure to hounds early in a baby’s life may build them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A caring owner can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise might well have: always-friendly faces, constant tendernes, hugs and sides to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic resist but precisely because it constitutes both parties happier, warmer and more contented tenants of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, caring home. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but investigate indicating that puppies and felines discover a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much affection for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it actually does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection discovers some problematic and murkier truths.

As many academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for example, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because babies cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be that those with more fund can, on the whole, render the luxuries of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 houses failed to find a relationship between owning a domesticated and overall health after chastening for revenues and the affluency of the local community. Other studies have had similar makes. And some even show domesticateds are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 parties in Finland, for instance, suggested that pet owneds are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some somewhat frightening downsides to baby ownership. In England, for instance, between 6,000 and 7,000 beings are admitted to hospital for dog bites every year. Tripping over babies is another potential danger- every year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 beings to infirmaries in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that babies bring into the house- the fleas, tickings and mites? And the potentially fatal sickness they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that are able passed to humen in cat and puppy saliva? For numerous parties, the answer to whether pets are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or savagery by another human than by a puppy, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are psychological downsides, too. One of the often remembered aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with sickness that last months or times. Presupposing you are a responsible baby owner, who takes this as seriously as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy emotional onu. A 2017 study involving 238 human participates found that pet owners with chronically ill domesticateds had higher levels of stress and feeling, read in conjunction with a lower quality of life. And after extinction? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead feline is not going to appear in an advert for Pet at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a residence could mean sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that domesticateds ever move us happier than the fact that so many of us get an animal, simply to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” hounds: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres has risen by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You need only scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments to be acknowledged that often particular puppy breeds are viewed as lifestyle accessories rather than living, breathing animals with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to introduced all these pros and cons into a melting pot and come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not babies are good for us, what would the answer be? The react would be … complicated. Because humans and our circumstances are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has both good and bad sides, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a baby and to consider the bad times, too: the insecurity, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I “ve been talking” my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving swine doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a pet can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Are pets really good for us- or just hairy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers repute a feline or pup can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the social sciences back them up?

My childhood dog was announced Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who oozed bravado and mettle. Yet, underneath everything is, he struggled with the dog version of phony syndrome. Biff was a bag of masked danger. He was like the teenager in institution who says he has check all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where frightening movies are played; the boy who has ” a girlfriend at another school “. It was that fragile side I especially cherished about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an insecurity that neither of us had the cognitive abilities to put into texts. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he developed older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and enjoyed good-for-nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coatings. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few darkness, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked sides and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the wizard was tickly and mollifying, and never once outraging, although there are those around me told me it was not a good project, chiefly because it was highly likely that, on any held epoch, Biff had remain his snout into some poor fox’s rotting corpse. I didn’t care. I laundered my hands like a surgeon subsequentlies, apparently. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m roughly 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own puppy. This feels like a very big decision. Part of the reason we want a dog is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flutter uneasily in the pit of my stomach. Will having a pet truly form us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet ever reach us better people?

Having
Having a hound could reach you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good bulletin, at face value, is this: if you are searching for proof that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence presented abounds. For instance, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your mas into a less emphasized surrounding. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and cats to serpents and goats. And there’s more. There’s evidence from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners stimulate fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Exactly last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having domesticateds, especially the bag of cats and pups. Scientists is hypothesized that by roaming the wildernes and producing novel bacteria back into our residences, some domesticateds may introduce our immune systems to pathogens we would not otherwise meet, tolerating pet-owners( and especially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial the societies of 1,200 homes in the US, for instance, found that the presence of puppies and felines have all contributed to more mixture in 56 and 24 first-class of bacterial species respectively. This may justify another study suggesting that exposure to bird-dogs early in a baby’s life may build them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A loving owner can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise might well have: always-friendly faces, constant compassion, nestles and sides to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic resist but only because it establishes both parties happier, warmer and more contented residents of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, loving dwelling. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but experiment has shown that puppies and felines find a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much affection for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it really does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection exposes some problematic and murkier truths.

As numerous academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for instance, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be situations where those with more fund can, on the whole, yield the indulgences of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 kinfolks failed to find a relationship between owning a baby and overall health after rectifying for income and the affluency of the local region. Other studies have had same develops. And some even recommend babies are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 parties in Finland, for instance, suggested that pet proprietors are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some jolly fearing downsides to pet ownership. In England, for example, between 6,000 and 7,000 parties are admitted to hospital for puppy pierces each year. Tripping over pets is another potential danger- every year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 beings to infirmaries in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house- the fleas, clicks and tinges? And the potentially fatal infections they can transmit to humen, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that are able guided to humans in “cat-o-nine-tail” and bird-dog saliva? For numerous people, the answer to whether pets are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or savagery by another human than by a puppy, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are emotional downsides, more. One of the often remembered aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here cancers that last months or times. Acquiring you are a responsible pet proprietor, who takes this as earnestly as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy psychological headache. A 2017 study involving 238 human participates found that pet proprietors with chronically ill pets had higher levels of stress and anxiety, coupled with a lower quality of life of canadians. And after extinction? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead cat is not going to appear in an advert for Pets at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a dwelling could make sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that babies always constitute us happier than the facts of the case that so many of us get an animal, exclusively to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” puppies: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres has risen by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You need only scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments to see how often certain bird-dog breeds are viewed as lifestyle accessories rather than living, breathing swine with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to threw all these pros and cons into a melting pot and provided us with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not pets are good for us, what would the answer be? The rebuttal would be … complicated. Because humans and our situations are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has good and bad areas, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a pet and to consider the bad times, more: the insecurity, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I have talked my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving swine doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a domesticated can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Are domesticateds really good for us- or precisely bushy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers thought a cat or puppy can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the social sciences back them up?

My childhood dog was announced Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who exuded bravado and gallantry. Yet, underneath it all, he fought with the dog version of impostor syndrome. Biff was a bag of masked anxiety. He was like the kid in academy who says he has visualize all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where scary movies are played; the kid who has ” a girlfriend at another academy “. It was that fragile area I specially cherished about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an danger that neither of us had the cognitive sciences to put into terms. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he flourished older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and desired good-for-nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coatings. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few nights, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked sides and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the awarenes was tickly and tranquilize, and never formerly disgusting, even though those around me told me it was not a good sentiment, mainly because it was highly likely that, on any caused daylight, Biff had fasten his beak into some poor fox’s decompose corpse. I didn’t care. I washed my hands like a surgeon afterwards, certainly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m nearly 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own hound. This feels like a very big decision. Part of the reason we want a bird-dog is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flutter anxiously in the quarry of my belly. Will having a pet genuinely establish us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet always become us better parties?

Having
Having a pup could acquire you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good word, at face value, is this: if you are looking for has proven that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence presented abounds. For instance, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your torso into a less emphasized predicament. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and felines to serpents and goats. And there’s more. There’s sign from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners constitute fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Exactly last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having pets, specially cats and hounds. Scientists is hypothesized that by roaming the wild and wreaking fiction bacteria back into our homes, some pets may acquaint our immune to systematically pathogens we would not otherwise meet, standing pet-owners( and especially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 homes in the US, for example, found that the presence of dogs and cats have contributed to more motley in 56 and 24 classifies of bacterial species respectively. This may explain another study suggesting that exposure to pups early in a baby’s life may stimulate them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A caring proprietor can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise ought to have been: always-friendly faces, constant empathy, hugs and handwritings to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic fight but only because it stimulates both parties happier, warmer and more contented residents of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, caring residence. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but study demonstrating that pups and “cat-o-nine-tails” look a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much tendernes for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it truly does seem there’s some truth to the claim that domesticateds are good for us. But closer inspection divulges some problematic and murkier truths.

As numerous professors have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for example, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be situations where those with more money can, on the whole, afford the luxuries of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 houses failed to find a relationship between owning a domesticated and overall health after chastising for revenue and the affluency of the neighbourhood locality. Other studies have had same arises. And some even advocate pets are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 beings in Finland, for example, suggested that pet proprietors are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some somewhat fearing downsides to baby owned. In England, for instance, between 6,000 and 7,000 people are admitted to hospital for bird-dog pierces every year. Tripping over pets is another potential danger- each year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 beings to infirmaries in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that babies bring into the house- the fleas, tickings and touches? And the potentially fatal sickness they can transmit to humen, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that can be elapsed to humen in feline and bird-dog saliva? For many parties, the answer to whether domesticateds are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or brutality by another human than by a pup, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are psychological downsides, extremely. One of the often forgotten aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here sickness that last months or years. Expecting you are a responsible domesticated owned, who takes this as seriously as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy psychological onu. A 2017 study involving 238 human participants found that pet proprietors with chronically ill pets had higher levels of stress and feeling, coupled with a lower quality of life. And after death? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead cat is not going to appear in an advert for Pet at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a residence could necessitate sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that pets always realise us happier than the facts of the case that so many of us get an animal, merely to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” dogs: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue cores increased by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You is needed scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments to see how often particular dog reproduces are viewed as lifestyle supplements rather than living, breathing animals with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to employed all these pros and cons into a melting pot and come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not pets are good for us, what would the answer be? The reaction would be … complicated. Because humans and our circumstances are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has good and bad surfaces, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a baby and to consider the bad times, extremely: the danger, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I “ve talked” my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving swine doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a pet can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Are domesticateds really good for us- or exactly hairy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers anticipate a “cat-o-nine-tail” or bird-dog can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the social sciences back them up?

My childhood dog was called Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, egotistical shetland sheepdog who exuded bravado and gallantry. Yet, underneath it all, he fought with the dog version of hypocrite disorder. Biff was a bag of disguised anxiety. He was like the kid in institution who says he has check all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where creepy movies are played; the kid who has ” a girlfriend at another academy “. It was that fragile side I especially adoration about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an insecurity that neither of us had the cognitive sciences to put into words. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he grew older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and adoration good-for-nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coatings. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few darkness, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked hands and wrists to his heart’s material. For me, the wizard was tickly and appeasing, and never formerly disgusting, even though those around me told me it was not a good plan, principally because it was highly likely that, on any generated era, Biff had fix his beak into some poor fox’s rotting corpse. I didn’t care. I bathed my hands like a surgeon afterwards, clearly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m virtually 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own bird-dog. This feels like a very big decision. Role of the reason we want a hound is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flutter uneasily in the quarry of my gut. Will having a pet genuinely move us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet ever acquire us better people?

Having
Having a dog could reach you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good word, at face value, is this: if you are looking for has proven that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence abounds. For speciman, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your torso into a less stressed statu. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and felines to snakes and goats. And there’s more. There’s ground from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners oblige fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Exactly last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having pets, especially cats and pups. Scientists is hypothesized that by roaming the wild and raising tale bacteria back into our residences, some domesticateds may innovate our immune systems to pathogens we would not otherwise meet, tolerating pet-owners( and specially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial the societies of 1,200 homes in the US, for example, found that the presence of hounds and felines led to more potpourrus in 56 and 24 classifies of bacterial species respectively. This may explain another study suggesting that exposure to pups early in a baby’s life may construct them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A loving owner can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise would have had: always-friendly faces, constant empathy, nestles and sides to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic defiance but only because it builds both parties happier, warmer and more contented residents of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, affectionate home. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but research demonstrating that puppies and felines identify a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much affection for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it genuinely does seem there’s some truth to the claim that babies are good for us. But closer inspection discovers some problematic and murkier truths.

As numerous professors have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for example, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be that those with more fund can, on the whole, afford the luxuries of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 houses failed to find a relationship between owning a pet and overall health after redressing for revenue and the affluency of the local neighbourhood. Other studies have had same results. And some even propose pets are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 people in Finland, for example, suggested that pet proprietors are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some moderately fright downsides to baby owned. In England, for example, between 6,000 and 7,000 parties are admitted to hospital for pup bites every year. Tripping over pets is another potential danger- every year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 parties to infirmaries in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house- the fleas, ticks and tinges? And the potentially fatal cankers they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that is able to guided to humen in feline and pup saliva? For numerous beings, the answer to whether babies are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or savagery by another human than by a hound, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are emotional downsides, too. One of the often remembered aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here diseases that last months or years. Usurping you are a responsible baby owned, who takes this as earnestly as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy emotional burden. A 2017 study involving 238 human players found that domesticated proprietors with chronically ill domesticateds had higher levels of stress and feeling, coupled with a lower quality of life of canadians. And after extinction? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead feline is not going to appear in an advert for Pets at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a dwelling could intend sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that domesticateds ever attain us happier than the facts of the case that so many of us get an animal, simply to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” dogs: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres has risen by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You is no need scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments is how often particular bird-dog engenders are viewed as lifestyle supplements rather than living, breathing swine with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to put all these pros and cons into a melting pot and has come forward with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not babies are good for us, what would the answer be? The answer would be … complicated. Because humans and our environments are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has good and bad surfaces, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a domesticated and to consider the bad times, extremely: the insecurity, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I “ve talked” my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving swine doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a baby can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Are babies really good for us- or simply bushy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers see a “cat-o-nine-tail” or dog can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the science back them up?

My childhood dog was called Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who oozed bravado and fearlessnes. Yet, underneath everything there is, he struggled with the dog version of phony syndrome. Biff was a bag of disguised danger. He was like the kid in institution who says he has attend all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where creepy movies are played; the kid who has ” a girlfriend at another institution “. It was that fragile area I specially enjoyed about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an insecurity that neither of us had the cognitive sciences to put into words. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he germinated older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and adored good-for-nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and hairs. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few nights, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked hands and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the sensation was tickly and mollifying, and never formerly disgusting, even though those around me told me it was not a good hypothesi, mainly because it was highly likely that, on any payed daylight, Biff had stick his beak into some poor fox’s rotting cadaver. I didn’t care. I cleansed my hands like a surgeon afterwards, clearly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m roughly 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own pup. This feels like a very big decision. Persona of the reason we want a hound is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flit uneasily in the pit of my belly. Will having a pet truly make us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet ever acquire us better beings?

Having
Having a pup could clear you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good information, at face value, is this: if you are looking for has proven that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence presented bristles. For instance, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your form into a less emphasized situation. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and felines to serpents and goats. And there’s more. There’s manifestation from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners move fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Just last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having babies, especially the bag of cats and hounds. Scientists suspect that by roaming the wild and making romance bacteria back into our houses, some pets may acquaint our immune systems to pathogens we would not otherwise meet, standing pet-owners( and specially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 homes in the US, for example, found that the presence of puppies and cats have all contributed to more hodgepodge in 56 and 24 classifies of bacterial species respectively. This may explain another study suggesting that exposure to puppies early in a baby’s life may obligate them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A caring proprietor can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise ought to have been: always-friendly faces, constant compassion, snuggles and handwritings to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic resist but just because it establishes both parties happier, warmer and more contented tenants of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, affectionate residence. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but investigate has shown that bird-dogs and felines hear a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much tendernes for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it really does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection uncovers some problematic and murkier truths.

As numerous academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for example, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because domesticateds cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be that those with more money can, on the whole, yield the luxuries of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 pedigrees failed to find a relationship between owning a baby and overall health after correcting for revenue and the affluency of the local region. Other studies have had same arises. And some even propose domesticateds are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 people in Finland, for example, suggested that pet owners are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some somewhat horrifying downsides to pet possession. In England, for instance, between 6,000 and 7,000 people are admitted to hospital for dog burns each year. Tripping over domesticateds is another potential danger- every year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 beings to hospitals in the US, especially elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house- the fleas, tickings and mites? And the potentially fatal cancers they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that can be delivered to humans in feline and bird-dog saliva? For numerous parties, the answer to whether babies are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or savagery by another human than by a hound, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are psychological downsides, too. One of the often remembered aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here cankers that last months or times. Usurping you are a responsible domesticated proprietor, who takes this as severely as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy emotional headache. A 2017 study involving 238 human players found that pet proprietors with chronically ill pets had higher levels of stress and nervousnes, read in conjunction with a lower quality of life. And after extinction? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead cat is not going to appear in an advert for Pet at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a home could represent sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the notion that domesticateds always become us happier than the fact that so many of us get an animal, only to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” hounds: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue cores increased by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You need only scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments is how often particular dog reproductions are viewed as lifestyle supplementaries rather than living, breathing swine with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to placed all these pros and cons into a melting pot and has come forward with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not babies are good for us, what would the answer be? The reaction would be … complicated. Because humans and our contexts are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has both good and bad surfaces, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a pet and to consider the bad times, extremely: the danger, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I have talked my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving animals doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a pet can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

30 Funny ” Co-Worker ” Pics From People Working From Home

In this difficult time that is the quarantine, most of us have to work from dwelling, which means we don’t get to see our colleagues. However, there’s the next best thing: our babies!

They are here for us to make our workday better. So “were asking you”, the Bored Panda community, to share your current furry, feathery, or scaley attendants and tell us what it is that they do during the workday.

Hopefully, these paintings will make your date a bit brighter.

Update: expressed appreciation for all for your lovely submissions! The strand is closed now.

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1 day ago

Pay attention to me hooman.

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1 day ago

report it to hooman sources 😀

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18 hours ago

My dog did that to me today—my first full daylight working from home. I was on a Skype call to boot.

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23 hours ago

You better pour him a goblet quick-witted, you look like you’re about to lose him if he doesn’t get his coffee soon..LOL. I desire this word-painting, it’s so adorable.

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1 day ago

Aw! What a astute coworker.

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5 hours ago

Finally! A feathered Co worker lol

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21 hours ago

Cat: You can have a meeting anytime, I need belly rubs now.

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7 hours ago

Hate it when that happens

Unfollow

1 day ago

Your coworker is adorable.

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9 hours ago

Mine’s done that by coincidence – comes over looking very sad. Remove them hooman – they’ve gone wrong!

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1 day ago

I can bring you catnip, I am very good in allowing my coworkers to lay on my computer, and I am key experts at chin scratches.

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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1 day ago

LOL!

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18 hours ago ( edited)

And managed to absorb the whole internet doing it. That clarifies the thousand yard stare.

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5 hours ago

IT department. Dang autocorrect! His name is Inigo Montoya … he’s got an attitude.

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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19 hours ago For anybody else wondering about that sticker, I did some study so I might as well share: it’s Trump kissing Putin with the word “make everything great again”. stsmall5 07…8 f8. u1. jpg 6 reply View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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1 day ago

Cat: You didn’t tell me you were having a meeting, Mom. Let me meet you.

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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2 hours ago

Def, an early bird co-worker.

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21 hours ago

I try to avoid attention at work and this guy misses attention.

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1 day ago

I love this, she sleeps just like my babe girl..No limiteds 🙂 <3

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5

reply

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17 hours ago

Cat: Stop taking pictures of mr and get to work.

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1 day ago

U look at me.

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1 day ago

What a beautiful doggo !!

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1 day ago

I love that refer !! Sparkie !!

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10 minutes ago

Those are adorable pups!

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12 hours ago

Nothing is more important than petting the feline! Work on your priorities, human!

Note: this upright initially had 56 epitomes. It’s been lessened to the top 30 personas based on user votes.

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Read more:

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Are pets really good for us- or precisely bushy health hazards?

/ by / Tags: , , , , , ,

Many animal-lovers fantasize a feline or dog can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the social sciences back them up?

My childhood dog was announced Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, cocky shetland sheepdog who oozed bravado and fearlessnes. Yet, underneath it all, he fought with the dog version of rogue disorder. Biff was a bag of masked anxiety. He was like the kid in institution who says he has picture all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where spooky movies are played; the kid who has ” a girlfriend at another academy “. It was that fragile back I specially adoration about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an insecurity that neither of us had the cognitive sciences to put into words. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he originated older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and loved nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and hairs. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few nights, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked handwritings and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the excitement was tickly and tranquilize, and never once disgusting, even though those around me told me it was not a good hypothesi, mainly because it was highly likely that, on any presented daylight, Biff had persist his beak into some poor fox’s decompose cadaver. I didn’t care. I laundered my hands like a surgeon subsequentlies, certainly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m roughly 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own dog. This feels like a very big decision. Division of the reason we want a hound is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flit anxiously in the cavity of my stomach. Will having a pet certainly reach us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet always manufacture us better beings?

Having
Having a bird-dog could prepare you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good information, at face value, is this: if you are looking for has proven that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence abounds. For speciman, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your torso into a less accentuated statu. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and felines to serpents and goats. And there’s more. There’s sign from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners move fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Precisely last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having domesticateds, especially cats and puppies. Scientists suspect that by roaming the wild and returning tale bacteria back into our rooms, some domesticateds may establish our immune to systematically pathogens we would not otherwise meet, tolerating pet-owners( and specially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 homes in the US, for instance, found that the presence of dogs and cats led to more smorgasbord in 56 and 24 first-class of bacterial species respectively. This may excuse another study suggesting that exposure to puppies early in a baby’s life may become them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A affectionate owner can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise would have had: always-friendly faces, constant tendernes, nuzzles and handwritings to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic fighting but just because it realise both parties happier, warmer and more contented tenants of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, affectionate home. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but experiment demonstrating that puppies and “cat-o-nine-tails” assure a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much tendernes for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it genuinely does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection discloses some problematic and murkier truths.

As many academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for instance, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be situations where those with more money can, on the whole, afford the indulgences of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 class failed to find a relationship between owning a baby and overall health after chastising for income and the affluency of the local locality. Other studies have had same outcomes. And some even recommend pets are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 parties in Finland, for instance, suggested that pet proprietors are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some moderately fright downsides to baby possession. In England, for instance, between 6,000 and 7,000 beings are admitted to hospital for hound bites every year. Tripping over domesticateds is another potential danger- each year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 people to hospitals in the US, especially elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house- the fleas, clicks and tinges? And the potentially fatal illness they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that is able to extended to humen in feline and dog saliva? For many beings, the answer to whether domesticateds are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or savagery by another human than by a hound, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are emotional downsides, extremely. One of the often forgotten aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here sickness that last months or times. Expecting you are a responsible domesticated owner, who takes this as earnestly as you would caring for a human family member, this is a heavy emotional headache. A 2017 study involving 238 human participants found that baby owneds with chronically ill domesticateds had higher levels of stress and anxiety, coupled with a lower quality of life of canadians. And after demise? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead “cat-o-nine-tail” is not going to appear in an advert for Pets at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a home could necessitate sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the idea that pets ever stimulate us happier than the facts of the case that so many of us get an animal, exclusively to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” dogs: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres increased by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You need only scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments to see how often particular pup engenders are viewed as lifestyle supplements rather than living, breathing animals with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to set all these pros and cons into a melting pot and has come forward with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not babies are good for us, what would the answer be? The rebuttal would be … complicated. Because humans and our situations are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has both good and bad surfaces, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a pet and to consider the bad times, too: the anxiety, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I have talked my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving animals doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a domesticated can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Japanese Artist Brings Stones To Life By Turning Them Into Animals That Fit In The Palm Of Your Hand( 30 New Pics)

Stones are everywhere–the Earth itself is a monstrous rock. This is probably why they don’t get much attention and they’re outright rejected, or thought of as dull. Akie Nakata, also known as the Stone Artist, find an exception to this rule. She has been depicting adorable animals on stones since 2010 and over meter, she has built quite a solid collection, some of which have already been featured on Bored Panda .

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12 hours ago

So realistic

We got an extended and exclusive interrogation from the Stone Artist and we have to tell you–she ideas her works in a very unique way. For her, stones is not only substances or canvases that she precisely reaps on. First, on her usual march along the riverbank, she observes a stone that catches her eye 😛 TAGEND

“When I find a stone, I feel that stone, very, has met me. Stones have their own goals and I consider my meetings with them as cues they give me that it’s OK to go ahead and paint what I find on them. So the stones I decide to cover on are not arbitrary, but my significant opposites with whom I have established a connect, who inspire me to work with them.”

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8 hours ago

So cute !!!!! I would not believe that they are rocks

Unfollow

10 hours ago

Those gazes are captivating. Must take hours to do these animals.

Some things may be as insensitive as a boulder, but Akie Nakata is cognizant of rocks in particular. The master leaves the forms of the stone untouched. She neither grinds nor smooths them, as she likes to stay true-blue to the stone that stimulated her. “In my meetings with the stones and in my artwork, I respect my opposites in toto, so I never process stones and would never cut off an perimeter to modify the shape. The prowes I want to create is a life freshly born in my hands through my dialogue with the stone. I was intended to decorate the life I feel inside the stone. I consider my work ended only when I be understood that the eyes are now alive and looking back straight at me. To me, ending a piece of work is not about how much item I suck, but whether I feel the living standards in the stone.”

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2 hours ago

Wow! A kea! I really really desire them.

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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9 hours ago

I love that she truly use the form of the stone so perfectly!

When encountering a unique position like this, one naturally wonders how this stone started wheeling. She has liked compiling rock-and-rolls and depicting animals since she was a child. But these interests abode separate, like two pebbles, for a while. One era, everything there is clicked when she was taking a step along a flow bank and checked a stone that examined “like a rabbit and nothing else.”

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8 hours ago

I like the before and after shots.

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13 hours ago

lookit those eyes! <3

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

The artist stressed that the stones are not for sale and she craves the viewer to simply enjoy the portraits themselves. You can do that next following her on her social media. And for now, here it is: a batch of seemingly dull rocks that were turned into something quite remarkable and super cute. Starts to show that beauty is in the eye of the bystander, and in Akie’s case, hands of the craftsman. Enjoy this refreshing cocktail of cute animals on the rocks. Cheers.

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12 hours ago

Favourite!

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1 hour ago

aw

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2 hours ago

Such talent such wow such doge

Unfollow

7 hours ago

The fur searches textured.

Unfollow

3 hours ago

The sees and speech are lovely! I think its especially great how the master could cover the stone in just the course of reveal the cheetah grow its foreman to be examined us, exploiting the form of the stone itself as the contours to the cat’s body. This one represents me wonder at whether the back is also painted, as its not reclining up against anything.

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10 hours ago

how!

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4 hours ago

That’s ravishing but … uhh … i don’t recall their necks stoop that method.> _ <(sry. it 's rlly pretty tho)

View More Replies …~ ATAGEND

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7 hours ago

The gazes look alive.

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6 hours ago

Great … now I’m gonna be singing “Baby Shark” for the rest of the day!

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1

reply

Unfollow

6 hours ago

Look out!

Unfollow

10 hours ago

I love this. She captivates the mind that speaks to her in every duo of eyes. I fall right into them.

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1 hour ago

Oh Bella Canine !!!!!! It looks like my Joley girl; -)

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7 hours ago

Truly Special!

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6 hours ago

My favorite !!!

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5 hours ago

* shniff* shniff

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1 hour ago

Its a FLOOF!

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0

reply

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3 hours ago

Slow loris! Okay, it would be slow even if it weren’t decorated on stone, as that’s the name of the animal. Lovely!

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These are so very lovely. They sees have it……..and you located a way to express them. THank you

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Are babies really good for us- or precisely bushy health hazards?

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Many animal-lovers imagine a feline or puppy can help you live a longer, happier, healthier life. But does the social sciences back them up?

My childhood dog was called Biff. Biff was a handful. He was a loud, egotistical shetland sheepdog who exuded bravado and bravery. Yet, underneath everything there is, he struggled with the dog version of impostor disorder. Biff was a bag of disguised anxiety. He was like the kid in institution who says he has envision all the scary movies, but refuses to go to any sleepovers where creepy movies are played; the kid who has ” a girlfriend at another school “. It was that fragile slope I especially cherished about Biff during my teenage years. We shared an danger that neither of us had the cognitive abilities to put into terms. This was a friendship- one that lasted as he grew older, grumpier and more infirm.

He was an exceptionally licky dog, and loved nothing more than slurping his tongue over our jeans, shoes, socks and coats. Officially, this behaviour was something we attempted to quash- but, every few nighttimes, I would tiptoe into the kitchen and allow him to lick my naked mitts and wrists to his heart’s content. For me, the perception was tickly and appeasing, and never once disgusting, although there is those around me told me it was not a good idea, chiefly because it was highly likely that, on any established daytime, Biff had fasten his snout into some poor fox’s rotting cadaver. I didn’t care. I washed my hands like a surgeon subsequentlies, certainly. But it was what Biff wanted.

I haven’t had a dog since Biff( I’m practically 40 ), and my family and I are deciding whether it’s time to get our own pup. This feels like a very big decision. Part of the reason we want a bird-dog is that we want to walk more. We want to be healthier. We want to be happier. But questions flit anxiously in the quarry of my gut. Will having a pet truly build us happier? Will we be healthier? Does having a pet always oblige us better people?

Having
Having a bird-dog could shape you go out more and get healthier. Photograph: LWA/ Getty Images

The good news, at face value, is this: if you are searching for have proved that having a pet improves your general health, the evidence bristles. For instance, there is plenty about how a bout of pet-stroking can lower your heart rate( and the pet’s ), easing your organization into a less accentuated plight. This seems to apply across the spectrum, from dogs and “cat-o-nine-tails” to snakes and goats. And there’s more. There’s ground from Germany and Australia( sample size: 10,000) that pet-owners acquire fewer visits to the doctor and, from China, that pet-owners sleep more soundly than those who aren’t. Just last week, the American Heart Association reported that the survival prospects for people who have had heart attacks and strokes are better in dog-owners than in those who are not.

There are other bonuses to having pets, specially cats and puppies. Scientists suspect that by roaming the wild and bringing tale bacteria back into our residences, some babies may initiate our immune to systematically pathogens we would not otherwise meet, granting pet-owners( and specially children) a chance to increase their resistance, while potentially reducing the chances of allergies in later life. A 2015 study investigating the fungal and bacterial communities of 1,200 dwellings in the US, for instance, found that the presence of pups and cats led to more collection in 56 and 24 class of bacterial species respectively. This may explain another study suggesting that exposure to bird-dogs early in a baby’s life may see them 13% less likely to develop asthma.

You could also argue that pet ownership helps us to feel better about ourselves. A caring owned can give an animal a far better life than it otherwise would have had: always-friendly faces, constant compassion, fondles and handwritings to lick late at night- not just to help pathogenic resist but just because it induces both parties happier, warmer and more contented tenants of planet Earth. That was what Biff and I had. Two species, both with equal rights to the same shared, loving dwelling. Connection.

This stuff is hard to measure, but experiment indicating that puppies and felines construe a spike in their levels of the “love molecule” oxytocin when interacting with their owners. If they feel so much affection for us, we must be doing something right.

So far so good: it genuinely does seem there’s some truth to the claim that pets are good for us. But closer inspection exposes some problematic and murkier truths.

As numerous academics have pointed out, other factors contribute to our general health- income, for instance, which is inherently linked to pet ownership because pets cost money. Bluntly, the truth behind some of these studies may simply be situations where those with more fund can, on the whole, render the indulgences of good health and pet ownership. One large-scale study in California involving 5,200 pedigrees failed to find a relationship between owning a domesticated and overall health after chastising for revenue and the affluency of the local neighborhood. Other studies have had same solutions. And some even suggest pets are bad for us. One study of 21, 000 beings in Finland, for instance, suggested that pet owneds are more , not less, likely to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

If you really want to go there, there are some quite fright downsides to baby possession. In England, for example, between 6,000 and 7,000 beings are admitted to hospital for hound gnaws each year. Tripping over domesticateds is another potential danger- every year, this sends an estimated 87, 000 beings to infirmaries in the US, particularly elderly people. And what of the parasites that pets bring into the house- the fleas, clicks and mites? And the potentially fatal maladies they can transmit to humans, from pathogens such as salmonella( from reptiles) and capnocytophaga that is able to elapsed to humen in feline and pup saliva? For many people, the answer to whether babies are good for us is clearly no- although, to be fair, you are far more likely to be exposed to disease or brutality by another human than by a dog, cat or pygmy hedgehog.

There are emotional downsides, very. One of the often forgotten aspects of pet ownership is having to care for animals into their old age, sometimes dealing with here sickness that last months or years. Acquiring you are a responsible domesticated owned, who takes this as severely as you would caring for a human own family members, this is a heavy emotional burden. A 2017 study involving 238 human players found that domesticated owners with chronically ill pets had higher levels of stress and nervousnes, coupled with a lower quality of life. And after fatality? My guess is that a family grieving for their recently dead feline is not going to appear in an advert for Pets at Home any time soon.

Sharing
Sharing a residence could represent sharing fleas. Photograph: Justin Paget/ Getty Images

But there is probably no more damning indictment of the notion that babies always see us happier than the fact that so many of us get an animal, only to give them up weeks, months or years later. This is especially true for “designer” and “handbag” puppies: in the past seven years, the number of chihuahuas in RSPCA rescue centres has risen by 700%; dachshunds are up 600% and pomeranians up 440%. You is no need scour dogsofinstagram for a few moments is how often particular pup raises are viewed as lifestyle supplements rather than living, breathing animals with greater needs than colour-coordinated doggy pop-socks and collar.

If we were able to placed all these pros and cons into a melting pot and has come forward with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not pets are good for us, what would the answer be? The explanation would be … complicated. Because humans and our occasions are so universally mixed up and complex. The simple truth is that having a pet has good and bad sides, and it may not be for everyone. Which means we have a duty to think carefully before acquiring one. We need to imagine the good times we might have with a baby and to consider the bad times, too: the danger, the grumpiness in old age, the infirmity.

I think I “ve talked” my way out of having a dog. If so, that’s OK. Loving animals doesn’t mean you have to have one. Ask not what a pet can do for you, but what you can do for a pet.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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