Tag Archives: art

Artistries in lockdown: I curated my own three-day online festival. Now it’s over, and I am wrecked

From Fleabag to a nightclub, from a biennale to the ballet, Brigid Delaneys personal IsoFest took her all around the world on her laptop but it wasnt the same

Does a lockdown without mass meetings necessitate a lockdown without culture? Not necessarily.

With my inbox crowding up with press releases from artistries organisations, musicians and novelists attempting to reach their audiences online, I realise we are now in a golden age of online prowess that- until beings used to work how to properly monetise it- is principally free or low-cost. I could move my own carnival from the comfort of my own home.

Curating my own three-day, multi-arts, multi-platform festival- to enjoy by myself- wasn’t the same as attending a real one. But it was … an experience.

Friday 17 April

5pm: a literary salon
How do columnists road test brand-new cloth in isolation? I met a Zoom group of around 20 Byron Bay-based writers for an old-fashioned literary salon. A melt start to my celebration, Byron on the Bed is a nice practice to kick back with a glass of wine-colored and listen. My favourite is a writer who doesn’t speak her own employment, but has recorded snippets of exchanges she’s overheard. The arise is funny, but weirdly poignant: a reminder of a time when we could get close enough to other people to eavesdrop on them.

For more: Bookmark the following websites to find out about upcoming online books happenings: the Wheeler Centre, Sydney novelists’ festival, Melbourne writers’ celebration, Yarra Valley writers’ celebration and brand-new series Together Remotely.

7:30 pm: tavern trivia
The Red Hill Hotel
is an excellent pub in a village simply up the road from my house in Victoria, who are hosting Zoom trivia once a week. On my unit is me and my brother( in one home ), my friend( at another, via FaceTime ), and his friend( at a third, texting his reply in ). We then Zoom in to where the quizmaster is, and meet more than 60 other faces: our competition.

It’s “the worlds largest” hectic trivia night I’ve ever attended. Our team’s communications system is like a centipede of flunking tech. The Zoom sections out after 40 minutes. When we log back in again, we’ve lost a teammate. The questions are too hard and we don’t know how to defer our answers. We don’t even have a team name. We never get to find out how we did because the Zoom pieces out again.

For more: Check the Facebook pages of your favourite local venues to see if they’ve moved any case online.

9:00 pm: an orchestra

Agitated by the trivia, hungry, and distracted by how close the Australian Chamber Orchestra musicians are to each other( this was filmed in 2018 ), I’m probably not in the claim district to loosen into the opening movement of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. Music academics have described it as the” most famous symphonic trajectory of expressive minor-key darkness to coruscating major-key light”, but where’s my pizza?

When it ultimately arrives, it doesn’t feel right eating junk food while listening to the ACO- which in real life I would sit rigidly still for the duration of, muffling every rub and cough. I am a bit drunk, texting and eating pepperoni pizza- but this immense work by Beethoven remains undimmed.

For more: Check outthe Australian Chamber Orchestra’s digital program here.

9:45 pm: a nightclub
Woo hoo! I’m logging into the club. Yeah! I’m logging in. What to wear to my first virtual nightclub? I believed to be briefly then exactly decide to go in the activewear I’ve been wearing for six weeks.

There are more than 300 people at Mr McClelland’s Finishing School , a Zoom party iteration of the Melbourne indie-pop night. The faces in the squares prompt me of Chatroulette: you never know what will appear on screen. In this case it’s either people sitting too close to their cameras or beings in sequins and hotpants dancing around a fairy-lighted room. Like at a ordinary organization, I’m texting friends who I arranged to meet here but can’t find:” I’m here, in the fraternity, where you ?”

As well as dancing( Primal Scream, Paul Simon, Robyn, Carly Rae Jepson ), you can message the DJ( Andrew McClelland) or shout out to other club members. I’ve set up Zoom with a speaker to bomb the music, and end up dancing and drinking until almost 1am. It’s so enjoyable , no one’s sleazing on anyone and I don’t have to worry about get an Uber home.

For more: Mr McClelland’s Finishing School are hosting parties every fortnight; find out more here.

Saturday 18 April

10 am: a visual arts biennale
I won’t lie. I committed a rookie lapse last-place nighttime: went too hard-handed on the first night of a celebration and now have two packed dates onward and cannot deal. At least I can attend this morning’s planned from my bed.

The Biennale of Sydney move away some of its program online; I head over to Cockatoo Island and then to the Art Gallery of New South Wales for a tour of Karla Dickens’ occupation. Please told the lockdown be over soon, so I can see this amazing work in real life. Visual art on a screen is just not the same.

For more : Find the digital platform of the 2020 Biennale of Sydney- Nirin- on its website and its YouTube channel.

12:30 pm: an exhibition
You’ll need a couple of hours to get the most from Crossing Lines. The incredible audiovisual knowledge of the National Gallery of Victoria ‘ s major Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat demo combines a virtual gallery 360 -degree walkthrough, a social record of New York in the 1970 s and 80 s, and lively audio tours.

At ages I get confused where I am in the cavity- and at other epoches I move the cursor too quickly and speed down hallways of prowes so quickly I feel sick. But for the most part I genuinely experience appreciating an exhibition this direction. For a beginning, it seems like a lot of imagined( and money) has gone into it; the NGV’s online offering is very slick and comprehensive. It wouldn’t surprise me if they keep this up in some model or other after the lockdown aims; it’s a great channel of accessing the gallery if “were living” far away.

For more : take the virtual tour of Crossing Lines at the NGV, and check out the rest of the NGV’s channel here.

1pm- 10 pm: a music carnival

Brigid
‘ My favourite new thing from this somber era ‘: Brigid Delaney’s view of Isolaid festival on 18 April 2020. Composite: Brigid Delaney/ Isolaid festival

This is the fifth iteration of Isolaid on Instagram, which has been my favourite brand-new thing from this stark meter. Each weekend the Australian musical celebration lineuphas not only reconnected me with my favourite creators( and their houses ), but initiated me to a stack of new music. Today I watch about two hours’ value of music, with spotlights including 20 -minute starts by The Bamboos, Christian Lee Hutson and Jet Black Cat.

While there was a lot of chat this past weekend about the big concerts by John Legend and Lady Gaga , in isolation I opt the most intimate accomplishments of lesser-known acts.

For more: Stay tuned to Isolaid festival on Instagram to be informed about next weekend’s lineup.

7:30 pm: a live podcast recording
Watching Annabel Crabb and Leigh Sales record a live episode of Chat 10 Looks 3 feels like catching up with old friends. As I make a batch of pumpkin soup( something I’ve never done at a carnival ), they speak iso roasting, journals and Bach via their Facebook page.

For more : Follow Chat 10 Looks 3 on Facebook .

Annabel
Annabel Crabb and Leigh Sales’ Facebook live broadcast of Chat 10 Looks 3. Photograph: Facebook

8: 30 pm: a ballet
Directed by David McAllister, the Australian Ballet ‘ s 2016 production processes Cinderella is beautifully hit and played- but it’s interrupted by the phone call from a friend who is recovering from Covid-1 9. After he absconded a crumbling villa in Italy just before the country locked its doorways, he went to Berlin, London, Dubai and Brisbane before succumbing to this” inferno malady “.

” Never take your health for granted ,” he tells me. I am still a bit hungover from the first night. I fall asleep and miss the end of the ballet.

For more: The Australian Ballet’s digital season is available here.

Sunday 19 April

7am: a meditation
Get up at 6:30 am. Very early for a carnival. This event is a Sonic Zoom Meditation . I don’t know what to expect. A gong seem soap? A choir? A musing? All three?

The event is US based and it’s 5pm there- but it’s actually well-suited to a crisp autumn sunup here. There are 357 beings in the Zoom group and at 7am my day the legion unmutes all our microphones and we make a voice. My sound sounds like I’ve just eaten off chicken and am about to be sick:” Arrgghhh, argghhh .” But together we all clang quite lovely.

For more : World Wide Tuning Meditations are happening every weekend.

8am: a Broadway piano bar
Now shuttered because of coronavirus, staff members of the famous New York piano bar Marie’s Crisis are continuing to perform showtunes from their dwellings- and you can tip them via Venmo.” This is how I buy toilet tissue and groceries ,” said Franca Vercelloni from her forte-piano as she launched under Hello Dolly.

Again, there was a sharp thrust of nostalgia as I remembered how it used to be: late at night, beings pressed around the piano, singing along, throwing mentions in the flask. I imagine though, for the community of people who went to the bar every week, singing via the internet is better than has no such singing at all.

For more : Marie’s Crisis are streaming performances every day on their Facebook page.

11.30 am: a musical

Brigid
‘ I devour leftover pumpkin soup for breakfast. Riveted by this musical .’ Photograph: Brigid Delaney
I’ve never seen Phantom of the Opera – and this creation, filmed at the Royal Albert Hall in 2011, is so slick. So professional. So much . The large-scale spokespeople. Opera capes. Night-robes. Heaving breasts. Epic hymns. But I get distracted- and sad- when the cameras pan across the theatre to show the audience. They are all out. Garmented up. In a theatre. Sitting close together. It feels subversive.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is currently liberate musicals on YouTube for a limited 48 hours each week, on a free or subscription basis. He’s so far gone through the 2012 stadium production of Jesus Christ Superstar( starring Tim Minchin) and the 1999 cinema of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat( starring Donny Osmond ). By the time I start streaming Phantom, it has previously considered 7.5 m times.

I eat leftover pumpkin soup for breakfast. Riveted by this musical. The Phantom is my favourite character- what a expres. I get chills where reference is shatters into the final rendition of All I Ask of You. You not that ugly, Phantom. I would marry you.

For more : Stay chanted to Andrew Lloyd Webber’s the Shows Must Go On YouTube channel to find out about the next show.

5:30 pm: a play
For a merely four quid( which goes to the NHS ), Soho Theatre in London is offering a 48 -hour rental of Phoebe Waller-Bridge ‘ s stage show Fleabag , which morphed into the hit TV series .

We set up the laptop, light-colored the fire and crack up laughing for almost two hours. I wish for a firepit and a movie projector, but like electric motorcycles and puppies there’s probably been a run on them.

Waller-Bridge is, of course, a brilliant writer. But this participate testifies just what a brilliant physical actor she is. That face!

For more: Head to the Soho theatre website to watch Fleabag on demand.

*

It’s Monday after my three-day IsoFest, and just like after any celebration, I am wrecked. My brain is mush from construing so much art, music, theater and dance. I desired sharing everything from a dance, to a read, to pub trivia with strangers. But … but … it’s not the same.

You make remembers at celebrations. You assemble people who become friends or love. There is serendipity and surprise- all this, plus the art. I suffered some of the best art and culture the world has to offer- but without the celebration audiences and a posse of friends it’s like the proverbial tree falling in the forest.

Did the celebration actually happen if there was no one else to share it with?

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Dan Robbins, artist behind paint-by-numbers phenomenon dies at 93

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Inspired by Da Vinci, the establishments of Dan Robbins were originally panned but went on to sell millions

Dan Robbins, an creator who established the first paint-by-numbers drawings and helped turn the gears into an American perception during the 1950 s, has died. He was 93.

Robbins, whose works were rejected by some commentators but later celebrated by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, died on Monday in Sylvania, Ohio, said his son, Larry Robbins.

He had been in good health until a series of twilights in recent months, his son said.

Robbins was working as a parcel designer for the Palmer paint company in Detroit when he came up with the idea for decorating by digits in the late 1940 s. He said his inspiration came from Leonardo da Vinci.” I recollected listening that Leonardo applied numbered background motifs for his students and apprentices, and I decided to try something like that ,” Robbins said in 2004.

He depicted his first struggle- an abstract still life- to his boss, Max Klein, who promptly told Robbins he disliked it.

But Klein verified potential with the overall concept and told Robbins to come up with something parties would want to paint. The first versions were of sceneries, and then he diverged out to ponies, puppies and kittens.

” I did the first 30 or 35 topics myself, then I started farming them out to other artists ,” said Robbins, who principally persisted to landscapes.

While the Craft Master paint-by-numbers kits weren’t embraced initially, marketings quickly taken away from and peaked at 20 m in 1955. Within a few years, though, the market was spate, marketings plummeted and Klein sold the company.

This
This image delivered by Larry Robbins presents a numbered outline of a ego painting of Dan Robbins. Photograph: AP

Together, Robbins helped create slice of Americana that are still collected and are noted framed in homes across the nation. Palmer still exchanges at the least two kits: one recollecting the 11 September attempts and the other depicting the Last Supper.

” We like to think dad was one of the most exhibited creators in the world ,” said Larry Robbins.” He enjoyed sounding from everyday parties. He had a whole box of follower words .”

Robbins, who spent much of his life in the Detroit area, was modest about his operate and didn’t get too inconvenienced by all the persons who mocked the paintings.

Critics came to view the paint-by-numbers kits as a metaphor for a commercialized, cookie-cutter culture and fretted that they far outnumbered original works of art, said William Lawrence Bird Jr, curator of the 2001 exhibit at the National Museum of American History.

Robbins, who created a work,” What the hell happened to Paint-by-Numbers ,” said at the exhibition:” I never claim that covering by multitude is art. But it is the experience of art, and it creates that know-how to the individual who would normally not pick up a brush , not dip it in paint. That’s what it does .”

Robbins is subsisted by his wife, Estelle, sons Michael and Larry, and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Dan Robbins, master behind paint-by-numbers phenomenon dies at 93

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Inspired by Da Vinci, the establishments of Dan Robbins were originally panned but went on to sell millions

Dan Robbins, an creator who formed the first paint-by-numbers draws and facilitated turn the gears into an American whiz during the course of its 1950 s, has died. He was 93.

Robbins, whose operates were dismissed by some reviewers but later celebrated by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, died on Monday in Sylvania, Ohio, said his son, Larry Robbins.

He had been in good health until a series of tumbles in recent months, his son said.

Robbins was driving as a parcel decorator for the Palmer paint company in Detroit when he came up with the idea for coating by numbers in the late 1940 s. He said his inspiration come back here Leonardo da Vinci.” I recollected listening that Leonardo use numbered background patterns for his students and apprentices, and I decided to try something like that ,” Robbins said in 2004.

He indicated his first strive- an abstract still life- to his boss, Max Klein, who immediately told Robbins he hated it.

But Klein encountered potential with the overall concept and told Robbins to come up with something parties would want to paint. The first versions were of landscapes, and then he division out to mares, puppies and kittens.

” I did the first 30 or 35 themes myself, then I started farming them out to other artists ,” said Robbins, who chiefly remained to landscapes.

While the Craft Master paint-by-numbers kits weren’t embraced initially, auctions instantly taken away from and peaked at 20 m in 1955. Within a few years, though, world markets was spate, auctions put and Klein exchanged the company.

This
This image provided by Larry Robbins proves a numbered drawing of a self likenes of Dan Robbins. Photo: AP

Together, Robbins facilitated make slices of Americana that are still collected and are find framed in homes across the person. Palmer still exchanges at least two paraphernaliums: one remembering the 11 September criticizes and the other illustrating the Last Supper.

” We like to think dad was one of the most exhibited creators in the world ,” said Larry Robbins.” He enjoyed listening from everyday beings. He had a whole container of devotee notes .”

Robbins, who expended much of his life in the Detroit area, was meagre about his cultivate and didn’t get too bothered by all the persons who mocked the paintings.

Critics came to view the paint-by-numbers paraphernaliums as a analogy for a commercialized, cookie-cutter culture and fretted that they far outnumbered original works of art, said William Lawrence Bird Jr, curator of the 2001 show at the National Museum of American History.

Robbins, who wrote a work,” Whatever Happened to Paint-by-Numbers ,” said at the exhibition:” I never claim that cover by digit is art. But it is the experience of artwork, and it fetches that knowledge to the individual who would normally not pick up a clean , not dip it in paint. That’s what it does .”

Robbins is survived by his wife, Estelle, sons Michael and Larry, and various grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Dan Robbins, master behind paint-by-numbers phenomenon dies at 93

/ by / Tags: , ,

Inspired by Da Vinci, the establishments of Dan Robbins was actually panned but went on to sell millions

Dan Robbins, an master who developed the first paint-by-numbers scenes and helped turn the equipment into an American superstar during the course of its 1950 s, has died. He was 93.

Robbins, whose duties were dismissed by some critics but afterwards celebrated by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, died on Monday in Sylvania, Ohio, said his son, Larry Robbins.

He had been in good health until a series of descends in recent months, his son said.

Robbins was labor as a bundle designer for the Palmer paint company in Detroit when he came up with the idea for covering by counts in the late 1940 s. He said his inspiration came from Leonardo da Vinci.” I remembered discovering that Leonardo use numbered background decorations for his students and apprentices, and I decided to try something like that ,” Robbins said in 2004.

He evidenced his first endeavor- an abstract still life- to his boss, Max Klein, who swiftly told Robbins he disliked it.

But Klein ascertained potential with the overall concept and told Robbins to be presented by something beings would want to decorate. The first forms were of landscapes, and then he diverged out to ponies, puppies and kittens.

” I did the first 30 or 35 subjects myself, then I started farming them out to other artists ,” said Robbins, who chiefly remained to landscapes.

While the Craft Master paint-by-numbers kits weren’t espoused initially, auctions promptly took off and peaked at 20 m in 1955. Within a few years, though, the market was spate, sales put and Klein sold the company.

This
This image provides for Larry Robbins depicts a numbered synopsi of a self portrait of Dan Robbins. Picture: AP

Together, Robbins facilitated compose slices of Americana that are still collected and are find framed in dwellings from all the regions of the society. Palmer still sells at the least two kits: one remembering the 11 September attacks and the other depicting the Last Supper.

” We like to think dad was one of the most exhibited creators in the world ,” said Larry Robbins.” He experienced discovering from everyday parties. He had a whole box of fan notes .”

Robbins, who invested much of their own lives in the Detroit area, was meagre about his wield and didn’t get too vexed by those who lampooned the paintings.

Critics came to view the paint-by-numbers kits as a metaphor for a commercialized, cookie-cutter culture and fretted that they far outnumbered original works of art, said William Lawrence Bird Jr, curator of the 2001 exhibit at the National Museum of American History.

Robbins, who wrote a volume,” Whatever Happened to Paint-by-Numbers ,” said at the exhibition:” I never claim that depict by amount is prowes. But it is the experience of art, and it brings that know-how to the individual who would normally not pick up a clean , not dip it in paint. That’s what it does .”

Robbins is lived by his wife, Estelle, sons Michael and Larry, and various grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

READ MORE

Dan Robbins, creator behind paint-by-numbers phenomenon dies at 93

/ by / Tags: , ,

Inspired by Da Vinci, the establishments of Dan Robbins was actually washed but went on to sell millions

Dan Robbins, an artist who generated the first paint-by-numbers scenes and facilitated turn the kits into an American hotshot during the course of its 1950 s, has died. He was 93.

Robbins, whose runs were dismissed by some reviewers but afterward celebrated by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, died on Monday in Sylvania, Ohio, said his son, Larry Robbins.

He had been in good health until a series of twilights in recent months, his son said.

Robbins was wielding as a bundle decorator for the Palmer paint company in Detroit when he came up with the idea for coating by multitudes in the late 1940 s. He said his inspiration came from Leonardo da Vinci.” I remembered discovering that Leonardo applied numbered background decorations for his students and apprentices, and I decided to try something like that ,” Robbins said in 2004.

He demo his first assault- an abstract still life- to his boss, Max Klein, who promptly told Robbins he detested it.

But Klein heard potential with the overall concept and told Robbins to be presented by something parties would want to cover. The first versions were of sceneries, and then he forked out to mares, puppies and kittens.

” I did the first 30 or 35 subjects myself, then I started farming them out to other masters ,” said Robbins, who mainly lodged to landscapes.

While the Craft Master paint-by-numbers kits weren’t hugged initially, auctions instantly taken away from and peaked at 20 m in 1955. Within a few years, though, world markets was submerge, sales plunged and Klein exchanged the company.

This
This image provided by Larry Robbins evidences a numbered sketch of a self photograph of Dan Robbins. Photograph: AP

Together, Robbins facilitated establish slices of Americana that are still collected and are learnt framed in residences across the person. Palmer still sells at the least two equipment: one remembering the 11 September onslaughts and the other outlining the Last Supper.

” We like to think dad was one of the most exhibited artists in the world ,” said Larry Robbins.” He enjoyed sounding from everyday people. He had a whole box of love characters .”

Robbins, who spent much of his life in the Detroit area, was meagre about his undertaking and didn’t get too inconvenienced by those who scorned the paintings.

Critics came to view the paint-by-numbers paraphernaliums as a analogy for a commercialized, cookie-cutter culture and fussed that they far outnumbered original works of art, said William Lawrence Bird Jr, curator of the 2001 expo at the National Museum of American History.

Robbins, who wrote a volume,” Whatever Happened to Paint-by-Numbers ,” said at the exhibition:” I never claim that depict by digit is art. But it is the experience of skill, and it accompanies that know-how to the individual who would normally not pick up a brush , not dip it in paint. That’s what it does .”

Robbins is subsisted by his wife, Estelle, sons Michael and Larry, and various grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Jeff Koons’ Louis Vuitton bags: a rapturous artwork record reading

In championing the likes of Fragonard, Rubens and Titian, Jeff Koons line of Louis Vuitton supplements delivers high art to the high street and indicates off his sincere passion for painting

High art needs all the friends it can get. Museum attendance is stopping throughout the world, and earnest attempts to tribunal the young and identify with the brand-new are clearly not working. Something more persuasive is involved: definitive feeling for great artwork in different languages parties in the 21 st century understand.

How about a Louis Vuitton suitcase with RUBENS written on it in big gold characters over a reproduction of that 17 th-century painters violent, exuberant and dazzling employment Tiger, Lion and the Leopard Hunt?

I cant think of a simpler way to employ great prowes at the vanguard of modern attentions. This is not a cynical effort. The hunt decorating is not a pop icon yet but a serious paint beloved by prowes connoisseurs. Jeff Koons, for instance.

Rubens is one of the great painters Koons has chosen to celebrate in a line of bags for Vuitton. Koons, a notorious appropriation master, is infamous for turning kitsch images and objectives into artistry, but for his array of handbags, rucksacks and other expensive supplements he is turning great skill back into popular culture. Just as Andy Warhol composed Warholised different versions of Renaissance art, Koons has turned the old masters into manner must-haves( if you can afford them tolls wander up to $4,000 ).

Frills,
Frills, foliage and flesh Jean-Honor Fragonards work adorns a Vuitton bag designed by Jeff Koons. Photograph: Louis Vuitton

For from rubbing Rubens in the grime and reducing the exalted to the worthless, these indulgence objectives look to me like heartfelt adorations to great prowes. Koons clearly has an erudite and heartfelt adore of oil painting, for while his containers touting the Mona Lisa and Van Goghs Wheat Field With Cypresses may be easy on our intelligences, he is also bravely training us by holding on the glamour of Rubens, Titian and Fragonard.

Frago-who? This 18 th-century French painter of flounces, foliage and flesh was the last practitioner of the precious and playful rococo mode that celebrated please and came to be seen by revolutionary moralists as a decadent courtly aesthetic of escapism and indulging. Many of his buyers died for the purposes of the guillotine in the French revolution. He was unfashionable then and is unfashionable now, but Koons has put his erotic painterly genius into the heart of the fad nature with a crate embellished with his 1770 painting Girl With a Dog, again decorated with the mention FRAGONARD in gold.

Jeff
Jeff Koonss Dirty Jeff on Top( 1991) with Constituted in Heaven( 1989) behind it. Photograph: Christian Sinibaldi for the Guardian

This may not be such a surprising pick for Koons after all. Fragonards provocative cover of a partly nude young lady playing with a fluffy dog in bed has at least two similarities with his own creations. His giant floral effigies of puppies are among his most bright subversions of what modern artwork is supposed to look like, and the depicts voyeurism shares his appetite for blurring the line between art and pornography.

Notice this, and you envision Jeff Koons in another way. This is an artist who looks at and thinks about prowes from the past, and finds his most bright plans there. The 18 th-century rococo and the strange genius of Fragonard is not something he detected yesterday. He has been drawing on the rococo for his sculptures for a long time. Similarly, his flamboyant super-pop paints are nothing less than attempts to revive the vigour of Rubens. A subtle feeling for art is concealed by his apparent faith in banality.

Now Koons is sharing the art he most affections. The capability of Rubens, the sensuality of Titian and the naughty painterly tarts of Fragonard clearly mesmerize him, and he craves other people to see what he insures. This is not simply a line of indulgence bags. It is an artists musing on the masters, in handbag model. Picasso facsimile and reworked enormous paints in his later years. Koons is offering a different kind of art assignment, and it is a rejoice. I want to see the epithets FRAGONARD and RUBENS glowing on Oxford Street, on Fifth Avenue, their masterpieces walking out of the museum into modern lives.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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Life in Lagos imitates art as squatters evicted for biennial expo

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Exhibition theme, Living on the Edge, takes on brand-new meaning as artists and squats at disused railway molted turfed out by state-owned railway company

When the organisers of Nigeria’s first biennial artwork expo announced it Living on the Edge, they could not have known how painfully apt the topic would be.

It was inspired by the squatters living in the carriages and houses of a disused railway shed, and their counterparts across Lagos, where dwelling is in short supply, and immense money and abject privation exist side by side. Masters were invited” to investigate the realities of the losers in cultures around the world- the unseen majority “whos” pushed to the brink of their existence “.

The households living in the age-old railway molted were surprised that anyone would want to host an exhibition in their run-down, leaky dwelling, but got involved, excavating furrows so it would not submerge, realise timber for the facilities and helping to clean up.

Artists
Artists and squatters worked together to transform an old-fashioned railway molted into the site of Nigeria’s first biennial artwork show, called Living on the Edge. Photo: Tom Saater for the Guardian

But in a bitter absurdity that manifests the murderous gentrification taking place from all the regions of the complex megacity, just as the depict opened last weekend the Nigerian Railway Corporation- the state-owned rail house- initiated to turf out many of the families.

The biennial’s organisers said they were dismayed.

” It’s called Living on the Edge, and then you merely push them off the cliff ,” said Folakunle Oshun, the biennial’s founder and artistic director, who tried in vain to stop the evictions.

As artists and squats carried container floras and strung up lightbulbs between rusting old-time teach carriages at one death of the shed, at the other an old pair stood bewildered among their strewn belongings, trying to carry but with nowhere to move to.

Squatters
Squatters remove all their belongings from the one of the purposes of the rail shed they had called dwelling for several years. Picture: Tom Saater for the Guardian

Abdul Raouf Akinwoye, a retired police officer who works with the Nigerian Railway Corporation and an architectural heritage organisation, Legacy, arrived with two” neighbourhood boys”- Lagos parlance for assassins- whom he had employed to enforce the eviction.

” They came from somewhere and they have to go back to where they came from ,” he said, including with no seeming incongruity:” We are asking them to go- in tandem with the theme of the exhibition .”

Akinwoye like to remind you that after a party organized by whisky company Jameson’s in the shed two weeks before, some cables had been embezzled, and all levels of society failed to return them when asked. They were living there illegally, and this was the last straw, he said.

Evictions are taking place all over the country, but especially in Lagos, where tens of millions ofpeople have been chased out of their residences in the past year, purportedly for environmental and security reasons. Reviewers say the real rationale is to make way for indulgence housing developments. In Otodo Gbame, where millions of fishermen’s homes that stood on stilts above the sea were razed, tonnes of sand have been dumped on top of the bulldozed devastates, generating more territory ripe for development.

Space is at a premium in upmarket the sectors of the city. A landowner can charge $50,000( PS38, 000) a year for a flat- and can require that two years’ lease be paid upfront. And room will only become more of an issue: Lagos is likely to be the world’s biggest metropoli by 2100, experts prophesy, with a population of 88 million.

It is not just the fact of forced eviction, but the murderous way in which they are often carried out.

Akinwoye caught one of the squats, a 14 -year-old boy who was treading past him, and action him to kneel in front of him.” If I ever see you here again, I will rend you apart ,” he shouted.

Abdul
Abdul Raouf Akinwoye, a retired police officer who works with the Nigerian Railway Corporation, pressures a squatter to kneel in front of him. Meanwhile, on the other side of the instruct carriage, artists were putting up the performance of their duties. Picture: Tom Saater for the Guardian

” We are working to sanitise this lieu ,” Akinwoye lent, downing the litre of strawberry milk he had with him and then throwing the carton on the floor. He had given the families 2 day to get out.

” Most of the women are irresponsible people. They conceal criminals. You don’t know them; we know them. Many of them exchange doses- cocaine and brew. You have sympathy for those people; they don’t deserve it. Those ladies are so devilish in their thinking and behaving .”

After the Guardian prepared asks, the Nigerian Railway Corporation said that those who had not yet been obliged out could stay for another two months- though the particular characteristics of the affected families will not have changed in that time.

Sitting by a accumulation of wood that used to serve as his furniture, Idowu Akin Pelu, a retired administrator for the Nigerian Railway Corporation, said none of their own families had money for rent or people who would take them in.

A
A guest examines Fati Abubakar’s photography from north-east Nigeria, on display at the country’s firstly biennial art show Photograph: Tom Saater for the Guardian

” They said whoever failed to remove whatever belonged to him or her would be arrested and carted away to prison ,” he said.” They said people of the world are coming and they want to transform this plaza to their own criterion. We don’t know where to go. We are in disarray .”

” They are stern. We are poor people. There is nothing like sorrow at all .”

Forcing parties out is not a strategy that will work in the long run, according to OluTimehin Adegbeye, a Nigerian novelist and activist.

” Poor beings don’t generally tend to disappear exactly because they’ve been stripped of everything the government had ,” she said in a recent Ted talk.

Folakunle
Folakunle Oshun, the aesthetic chairman of the biennial. Image: Tom Saater for the Guardian

Visitors to the biennial who learned what was happening on the other side of the shed were sickened. However, most were unaware of forced eviction taking place. Oshun tried to stop them, but as Legacy was not billing him to use the seat, he had little power.

Setting up a biennial in traffic-choked, expensive Lagos has not been easy. With no fund, artists were asked to pay their own style and Oshun, an creator and curator known for his meditations on jollof rice, did not know until weeks before the launch whether he would pull it off.

Wooden boxers with footballs for brains campaigned, representing the Nigerian beings and their government battling bribery; the artist, Ayo Akinwande roped them off from a accumulation of rotting accept. Puppies that had walked in from the community living next door sleep between the ways as David Palacios checked up on his dissected echo ring-binders, full of statistics on violence.

Sunlight shone through pictures of women viewing candles been put forward in the empty spaces of a wall, eerily lighting them. Chickens pecked at the sand, hop-skip into a plot of banana leaves below a clutch of glowing framed videos, all of which featured an orange peel. At the end of the running shed, young men played football.

” It actually takes bowels to do this without money ,” said Rahima Gambo, a visual reporter and documentary photographer who filled a study carriage with greenery and school desks as one of the purposes of a long-term projection looking at potential impacts of the Boko Haram insurgency in Maiduguri.

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Jeff Koons’ Louis Vuitton pockets: a rapturous prowes history exercise

In endorse the likes of Fragonard, Rubens and Titian, Jeff Koons line of Louis Vuitton supplementaries returns high art to the high-pitched street and evidences off his sincere passion for painting

High art needs all the friends it can get. Museum attendance is plummeting all over the world, and earnest attempts to courtroom young persons and identify with the brand-new are clearly not working. Something more persuasive is necessitated: definite feeling for enormous skill in different languages beings in the 21 st century understand.

How about a Louis Vuitton crate with RUBENS written on it in big golden notes over a reproduction of that 17 th-century painters murderous, exuberant and exquisite undertaking Tiger, Lion and the Leopard Hunt?

I cant think of a simpler way to make great prowes at the vanguard of modern judgments. This is not a cynic workout. The hunting painting is not a pop icon hitherto but a serious cover beloved by artwork connoisseurs. Jeff Koons, for instance.

Rubens is one of the great painters Koons has chosen to celebrate in a line of suitcases for Vuitton. Koons, a notorious appropriation creator, is infamous for turning kitsch portraits and objectives into skill, but for his stray of handbags, rucksacks and other expensive supplements he is turning enormous artistry back into popular culture. Just as Andy Warhol developed Warholised versions of Renaissance artwork, Koons has turned the old masters into style must-haves( if you can afford them rates straddle up to $4,000 ).

Frills,
Frills, foliage and flesh Jean-Honor Fragonards work adorns a Vuitton bag designed by Jeff Koons. Image: Louis Vuitton

For from rubbing Rubens in the clay and reduce the number of sublime to the worthless, these luxury objectives look to me like fervent adorations to enormous artistry. Koons clearly has an erudite and enthusiastic adore of oil painting, for while his bags touting the Mona Lisa and Van Goghs Wheat Field With Cypresses may be easy on our brains, he is also bravely civilizing us by insisting on the glamour of Rubens, Titian and Fragonard.

Frago-who? This 18 th-century French painter of flounces, foliage and flesh was the last time practitioner of the precious and playful rococo mode that celebrated amusement and came to be seen by revolutionary moralists as a decadent courtly aesthetic of escapism and self-indulgence. Many of his patrons died under the guillotine in the French change. He was unfashionable then and is unfashionable now, but Koons has put his sensual painterly genius into the heart of the style macrocosm with a container embellished with his 1770 decorating Girl With a Dog, again decorated with the epithet FRAGONARD in gold.

Jeff
Jeff Koonss Dirty Jeff on Top( 1991) with Stirred in Heaven( 1989) behind it. Photograph: Christian Sinibaldi for the Guardian

This may not be such a surprising selection for Koons after all. Fragonards provocative painting of a partly nude young woman playing with a fluffy pup in plot has at least two similarities with his own initiations. His giant floral statues of puppies are among his most bright subversions of what modern art is supposed to look like, and the covers voyeurism shares his appetite for blurring the line between arts and pornography.

Notice this, and you discover Jeff Koons in another way. This is an artist who looks at and thinks about artwork from the past, and feels his most brilliant ideas there. The 18 th-century rococo and the strange genius of Fragonard is not something he detected yesterday. He has been outlining on the rococo for his figures for a long time. Similarly, his ostentatious super-pop decorates are nothing less than attempts to revive the intensity of Rubens. A subtle anger for art is concealed by his apparent faith in banality.

Now Koons is sharing the artwork he most adores. The power of Rubens, the sensuality of Titian and the naughty painterly pastries of Fragonard clearly mesmerize him, and he wants other people to see what he recognizes. This is not simply a line of luxury pockets. It is an artists reflection on the masters, in handbag anatomy. Picasso replica and reworked enormous covers in his later years. Koons is offering other kinds of artwork assignment, and it is a delight. I want to see the epithets FRAGONARD and RUBENS brightening on Oxford Street, on Fifth Avenue, their masterpieces walking out of the museum into modern lives.

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Fake off! Meet baking’s masters of misconception patties

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On Tuesday, Channel 4s first batch of Bake Off contenders wowed Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood with patties resembling sandwiches and watermelons but theyre nothing compared with these hyperreal delights

Illusion patties- cakes that look like something they are not- is indispensable seemed the perfect ruse to divert the eye from The Great British Bake Off‘s own recasting.( Was it actually Bake Off ?) Illusion is a burgeoning expanse of baking, although its practitioners prefer to think of their creations as “hyperrealistic” and themselves as cake artists.

Emma Thomas, a” curator of patty”( she is” employed to bring together cakes as you would do art for an artistry demonstrate “), says hyperrealism is a reaction to the tweeness of the sugarcraft action. You know the kind of thing: cute puppies and friendly mouse and sprays of lifts. Hyperrealist cake masters don’t do friendly mouse. They “re probably”, in a gesture to early hyperrealist patty artist Debbie Goard, to do dead rats.

After cupcakes, popularised in the late 1990 s by the Magnolia Bakery in New York, went mainstream,” People began to get bored of cake ,” says Thomas. So cakes burst out of their frilly mini-cases and departed sculptural.

Shells,
Shells, starfish, anemone cakes and biscuits from Sarah Hardy’s Edible Museum. Picture: Sarah Hardy

Most cake artists did not start out as bakers. Sarah Hardy considered as an creator before training in wax representations at Madame Tussauds. She became a hyperrealist pioneer five years ago when she deferred a patty to a establish at Olympia in London. The theme was the seaside.” Everyone had done beach huts. What I did was to think as a sculptor and restate it to nutrient. I did a rockpool with seaweed and mussels and barnacles. It was the ugliest patty there .” But it caught the reviewers’ seeings and she began to receive fees, including the right for a” half-zombie, half-human” cake for Georgia May Jagger’s birthday.

A few months later, in early 2013, Natalie Sideserf penetrated a lifelike cake model of Willie Nelson’s psyche in a baking competition in Texas. She triumphed, and the Sideserf Cake Studio was born. Sideserf examined fine art at Ohio State University, and Thomas says her work is now” the epicenter of hyperrealist cake artistry “. She achieved notoriety with her own wedding cake: a plate decorated with the words” Till death do us portion”, on which wheeled the severed the heads of state of her and her husband.

Severed
Heads will wheel … Natalie Sideserf designed this cake for her bridal. Photograph: Sideserf Cake Studio/ sideserfcakes.com

There is a dark seam to hyperrealist cake art- perhaps because the artists just knowing that, sooner or later, their cakes must go to the bayonet. The endgame is built into the art’s notion. Hardy says:” There’s a friction there when you compose something that’s very realistic. Beings don’t want to spoil it, they don’t want to cut it .” Hardy ‘s patties start at about PS500 and take up to 2 week to body-build, including the planning and armature.” You have to really enjoy and celebrate that brief duration that[ the artwork] is there for. With the grisly trash, parties tell you they couldn’t eat it. But once they are in the chamber, they are compelled to try. It throws that additional point of looking disgusting and savouring amazing .”

These patties become horror appetizing. Where will you make the knife? The figure changes determine as it is expended. Its demolition is its fruition.

Ben
Breakfast anyone? Here, Ben Churchill utilizes a blood orange bavarois sitting on piped chocolate Photo: Courtesy of Ben Churchill

Thomas formerly provided a head patty.” I cut across her mouth and then down the middle-of-the-road of her face .” Parties were aghast.” I was like,’ It’s lemon drizzle! It’s cake. Just eat it !'” But some people can’t. Cake artist Natasha Collins made a patty disguised as half-eaten frivolity studded with cigarette laughingstock at a party for Kerrang! magazine in 2011 but when they were” handed out to hardened rockers , no one would stroke them “. She saves her hyperrealist creations off her website in case it applies the brides off.

The Bake Off bakers steered clear of repugnance, focusing instead on disguising patty as other meat- a sandwich, a container of ramen, a loaf of bread. These nod to the fast-food subset of hyperrealism, in which highly calorific nutrients are disguised as other highly calorific food. Ben Churchill, a rarity in the hyperrealist cake world in that he is a chef in his epoch position, specialises in breakfast-themed cakes- cooked beans made use of marzipan and covered in orange syrup, presented on toast that is a slice of lemon cake. He wishes congruity to surprise, so his realist lemons are made from lemon bavarois.

Other essential ingredients for the fast-food hyperrealist are rice crispies( great for sesame seeds on buns, says amateur hyperrealist Katherine Solomon ), marzipan( great for surface) and cornflakes( composition of fried chicken ). But all “youve been” need, says Hardy, is” a slew of chocolate, fondant and some really nice patty. It’s the nutrient equivalent of clay and wood .”

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Life in Lagos models art as squatters dispossessed for biennial show

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Exhibition theme, Living on the Edge, takes on brand-new entail as masters and squats at disused railway shed turfed out by state-owned railway company

When the organisers of Nigeria’s firstly biennial artwork show announced it Living on the Edge, they could not have known how dreadfully apt the theme would be.

It was inspired by the squatters living in the carriages and buildings of a disused railway shed, and their equivalents across Lagos, where home is in short supply, and vast property and abject privation exist side by side. Creators were invited” to analyse the realities of the losers in cultures around the world- the unseen majority who are pushed to the brink of their existence “.

The categories living in the age-old railway shed were surprised that anyone would want to host an exhibition in their run-down, leaky dwelling, but got involved, excavating trenches it is therefore has not been able to spate, looking grove for the installations and is contributing to clean up.

Artists
Artists and squats worked together to transform an old-fashioned railway shed into the website of Nigeria’s first biennial skill show, announced Living on the Edge. Picture: Tom Saater for the Guardian

But in a bitter incongruity that reflects the brutal gentrification taking place across the complex megacity, just as the picture opened last weekend the Nigerian Railway Corporation- the state-owned railing firm- initiated to turf out many of the families.

The biennial’s organisers indicated that they are dismayed.

” It’s called Living on the Edge, and then you precisely push them off the cliff ,” said Folakunle Oshun, the biennial’s founder and artistic head, who tried in vain to stop the evictions.

As artists and squats drag utensil flowers and strung up lightbulbs between rusting age-old learn carriages at one purpose of the shed, at the other an old-fashioned pair stood bewildered among their strewn belongings, are seeking to battalion but with nowhere to move to.

Squatters
Squatters remove all their belongings from the part of the railway shed the selection board had announced home for several years. Image: Tom Saater for the Guardian

Abdul Raouf Akinwoye, a retired police officer who works with the Nigerian Railway Corporation and an architectural heritage organisation, Legacy, arrived with two” neighborhood boys”- Lagos parlance for goons- whom he had employed to enforce the eviction.

” They came from somewhere and they have to go back to where they came from ,” he said, adding with no obvious paradox:” We are asking them to go- in tandem with the theme of the exhibition .”

Akinwoye said that after “states parties ” organized by the whisky busines Jameson’s in the shed 2 week before, some cables had been plagiarized, and members of the community failed to return them when asked. They were living there illegally, and this was the last straw, he said.

Evictions are taking place all over the country, but particularly in Lagos, where tens of millions ofpeople ought to have chased out of their dwellings in the past time, purportedly for environmental and safety reasonableness. Commentators say the real intellect is to make way for luxury housing developments. In Otodo Gbame, where millions of fishermen’s mansions that stood on stilts above the sea were bulldozed, million tonnes sand have been dropped on top of the bulldozed ruins, developing more district ripe for development.

Space is at a premium in upmarket areas of the city. A proprietor can charge $50,000( PS38, 000) a year for a flat- and can ask that two years’ payment be paid upfront. And space will only become more of an issue: Lagos is likely to be the world’s biggest city by 2100, experts predict, with a population of 88 million.

It is not just the facts of the case of forced eviction, but the murderous style in which they are often carried out.

Akinwoye caught one of the squats, a 14 -year-old boy who was stepping past him, and action him to kneel in front of him.” If I ever see you here again, I will weeping you apart ,” he shouted.

Abdul
Abdul Raouf Akinwoye, a retired police officer who works with the Nigerian Railway Corporation, obliges a squat to kneel in front of him. Meanwhile, on the other side of the learn car, artists were putting up their works. Photograph: Tom Saater for the Guardian

” We are working to sanitise this place ,” Akinwoye contributed, downing the litre of strawberry milk he had with him and then hurling the carton on the floor. He had given the families 2 day to get out.

” Most of the women are irresponsible people. They hide offenders. You don’t know them; we are aware. Many of them exchange doses- cocaine and beer. You have sympathy for those people; they don’t deserve it. Those dames are so ghoulish in their thoughts and playing .”

After the Guardian constituted research, the Nigerian Railway Corporation said that those who had not yet been action out could stay for another two months- though the circumstances of the affected houses will not have changed in that time.

Sitting by a stockpile of timber that used to serve as his furniture, Idowu Akin Pelu, a retired executive for the Nigerian Railway Corporation, said none of their own families had coin for rent or people who would take them in.

A
A visitor examines Fati Abubakar’s photography from north-east Nigeria, on display at the country’s first biennial artistry expo Photograph: Tom Saater for the Guardian

” They said whoever failed to remove whatever belonged to him or her would be arrested and carted away to prison ,” he said.” They said beings of the world are coming and they want to alter this lieu to their own criterion. We don’t know where to go. We are in disarray .”

” They are stern. We are poor people. There is nothing like sadnes at all .”

Forcing parties out is not a strategy that will work in the long run, is in accordance with OluTimehin Adegbeye, a Nigerian columnist and activist.

” Poor beings don’t generally tend to disappear just because they’ve been stripped of everything the government had ,” she said in a recent Ted talk.

Folakunle
Folakunle Oshun, the aesthetic director of the biennial. Picture: Tom Saater for the Guardian

Visitors to the biennial who learned what was happening on the other side of the molted were stunned. Nonetheless, most were unaware of forced eviction taking place. Oshun tried to stop them, but as Legacy was not charging him to use the cavity, he had little power.

Setting up a biennial in traffic-choked, expensive Lagos has not been easy. With no fund, creators were asked to pay their own mode and Oshun, an artist and curator known for his meditations on jollof rice, did not know until weeks before the launch whether he would pull it off.

Wooden boxers with footballs for psyches campaigned, representing the Nigerian parties and their government battling corruption; the artist, Ayo Akinwande roped them off from a slew of decomposing accept. Puppies that had walked in from the community living next door sleep between the ways as David Palacios checked up on his dissected resound binders, full of statistics on violence.

Sunlight shone through pictures of women maintaining candles put up in the empty openings of a wall, eerily igniting them. Chickens pecked at the ground, hopping into a couch of banana leaves below a clutch of radiant framed paints, all of which boasted an orange peel. At the end of the running shed, young man played football.

” It really takes intestines to do this without money ,” said Rahima Gambo, a visual correspondent and documentary photographer who crowded a set cab with greenery and school desks as part of a long-term job looking at the impact of the Boko Haram insurgency in Maiduguri.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

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